Entertainment

The 62nd National Family Island Regatta held its Closing Ceremony and Awards Night on Saturday, April 25

April 28, 2015

The 62nd National Family Island Regatta held its Closing Ceremony and Awards Night on Saturday, April 25, at the Government Complex in George Town, attended by Her Excellency Governor General Dame Marguerite Pindling, Prime Minister the Rt. Hon. Perry Christie, and many officials, sailors, and regatta supporters...

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Winners of the National Family Island Regatta in Georgetown,Exuma

April 28, 2015

Winners of the the National Family Island Regatta in George Town on the weekend were awarded their prizes at the Closing Ceremony on Saturday evening at the Government Complex...

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National Family Island Regatta, April 23-25, 2015

April 28, 2015

Series Race Champions after three days of sailing three races in the National Family Island Regatta...

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Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa Resort Offshore Island Hosts Vibes on the Island 2015 Benefit Concert Featuring Tarrus Riley and Chronixx
Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa Resort & Offshore Island Hosts "Vibes on the Island 2015" Benefit Concert Featuring Tarrus Riley and Chronixx

April 28, 2015

The Sandals Foundation, the non-profit arm of Sandals Resorts International hosted a sold out crowd of over 800 guests at Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa Resort & Offshore Island for an exciting evening of gourmet food, premium brand spirits and great music all in support of a great cause...

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Look Out for Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival's Big Truck

April 28, 2015

Meet Music Masters artists and sign up for Road Fever at Last Frankie’s Fete on Arawak Cay this Thursday...

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Vibin' on the island with Tarrus Riley

April 23, 2015

Free your mind because it's definitely a great vibes on the island kind of weekend with one of this reggae generation's finest singer/songwriters in the person of Tarrus Riley. And no matter if you've seen Tarrus Riley perform before, you want to go to this weekend's concert with no expectations and be ready to receive what Riley is giving out.
"I just want to give you your favorite songs and a little bit of the new things that we're going into. I want to make you dance, I want to make you listen, I want to make you groove and I want to have a good time," Riley told The Nassau Guardian, prior to his arrival in The Bahamas.
"Expect the unexpected, because we don't really like to be predictable. Just come to have a good time [and] definitely come with high spirits to have a good time, but don't expect anything. Just come with a free mind. "
Riley along with special guests Dean Fraser & The Blak Soil Band along with Chronixx and Zinfence Redemption will take to the stage on Saturday at the Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa Resort and Private Offshore Island.
The Sandals Foundation will donate proceeds from the concert to the PACE (Providing Access to Continued Education) foundation to refurbish a one-of-a-kind support center that will serve the needs of the girls in a centrally located facility. PACE ensures that teen mothers have the opportunity to complete high school; reduce the incidence of repeat pregnancy among teen mothers; improve the quality of life for teenage mothers and their babies; ensure that teen mothers are educated on the negative impact of repeat teen pregnancies and use the lessons of teen mothers to inform stakeholders of the ways to prevent teen pregnancies.
It's a cause that's resonates with the crooner who is an advocate for women's rights and respects women. It saddens him to hear of young ladies getting pregnant at 16 and having another child before they're 20.
"I have a high level of respect for woman, and my mother is definitely one of my best friends, so I try to sing songs to uplift women, and against domestic violence -- 'She's Royal' -- telling women that they're a queen. When I do concerts in aid of these kinds of things, it's extra special, and not just entertainment alone. You lend your entertainment ... you lend your craft to a good cause, and I'm all about that," he said.
He was born Omar Riley in the Bronx, New York and raised in Jamaica. The son of veteran Jamaican reggae singer Jimmy Riley, he has been in the game a long time. He made his recording debut in 2004 with the release of the album "Challenges"; his breakthrough album "Parables" was released on October 31, 2006. That album became popular in 2007. "She's Royal" catapulted him into reggae's major league. He has maintained a steady output of hit singles ever since. His diverse catalogue ranges from the syncopated dancehall verve of "Good Girl Gone Bad" (featuring Konshens) to the percussion driven celebration of African identity of "Shaka Zulu Pickney".

Time flies
"Even though it feels like forever because I've been recording since I was nine, I still have a lot to do -- more albums to produce, young talent that I've been helping to bring on the scene, and even advising them ... there's so much aspects of music to explore. I want to be producing. I want to do other things. I don't want to be just locked in a studio for the rest of my life. I want to spend time with my kids and do some other things."
It was just last year on his fifth studio album "Love Situation" that Riley paid tribute to reggae's direct forerunner rocksteady, and more than finding his musical direction, began working independently and owning his music. Last year he said he had finally reached maturation in a changed music industry. "Love Situation" which dropped February 2014 was Riley's first album to top the Reggae album chart, the week following its release. Rocksteady provides an ideal platform for Riley's talents with "Love Situation" which is said to be his finest, most cohesive full-length release to date.
Riley's great voice and great songs it is said has kept cultural reggae alive.

The music
Reggae has sustained the test of time and evolved from a simple music art form known as Mento, and developed in the early 20th century. In the 50s, Rock n' Roll spurred the Ska music form, and with a new generation of peppy horn melodies and uptempoed vocal sounds, reggae found the potential to cross over into the mainstream music industry. It happened with a mega hit from a small girl with a big voice, Millie Small, and her debut single "My Boy Lollipop". This sparked a creative explosion in the industry overnight with "reggaelution" in full gear and artists like Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh and King Stitch emerging from that era.
In the 60s reggae took form with a mellow beat and mind-bending conscious lyrics and rebel bands that spoke the words of the people. The mystical influence of reggae captured fans worldwide and reggae was a real influence internationally. Bob Marley and the Wailers sang songs of hope and freedom that stretched to the war-torn jungles of Vietnam and the heart-aching women in the United States and giving protestors a voice to carry on. The song "War" by Bob Marley and the Wailers impacted the world.
Then came the experimental 70s and a new stage in the evolution of the art form, with the birth of dancehall, and it was all about one drop rhythms and versatile lyrics.
In the 80s, every major label wanted a reggae catalogue. And in the 90s the Japanese discovered reggae. In the 2000 era, and new millennium potential is all around with the likes of Riley among others. The next generation of reggae is currently unfolding, and as it evolves Riley says the message stays the same.
"We change with the breeze -- if the breeze is blowing hard, we put on a different kind of attire. If it's raining you have a different kind of attire, so we accept change and love change, and look forward to change, but always remember -- the more things change the more they remain the same," he said.

Inspiration
As for his inspiration, it's the people.
"People inspire me. I'm inspired by people and different situations and conversation and stuff like that ... I'm inspired by history, I'm inspired by love and nature and stuff like that," he said. As for his influences, he said it would be too many people to list.
And his favorite song is determined by the moment he's in.
"I have so many songs that are favorite depending on the mood, so it's a wide variety in any genre. I'm influenced by the greats and up and coming greats, and my favorite song just depends on what kind of mood I'm in," he said.
As for what's in the Riley pipeline, he said he has many things happening, including new music coming out with international influences.
Major Lazer's "Powerful" from his upcoming "Peace Is The Mission" album features "Lights" singer Ellie Goulding with Tarrus, the roots reggae crooner. "Powerful" leaked on Thursday afternoon. "Peace Is The Mission" is expected to drop on June 1.
"Recently we did a song about marijuana becoming more legal, I have a video coming out about that. We have a lot of different things happening," he said.
Tarrus Riley the man versus the artist?
Tarrus Riley the man and the artist are one and the same. What you see is what you get according to Riley who says he really doesn't like to talk about himself much.
"I like to just live. I just like to be easy ... I like to go to the river ... I like to reason with my friends -- have a good meal, listen to some music ... make music. I'm like Superman and Clark Kent -- Omar Riley is Clark Kent and Tarrus Riley is Superman," he said.
And in this era of social media he says people know more about him than they think they know. But he assures that his stage persona is not far from the person they hear on the CD.
"It's not really an act for me, like a lot of artists are two different people. I'm very close to what you hear on the record. I'm not that far from it." He says he is not Tarrus Riley one night and a totally different person the next day.
The dulcet lover who at midnight on Sunday, April 26 will attain his 36th birthday, the day after the Vibes on the Island concert will awaken in The Bahamas and he said he's looking forward to a cool drink of switcha.
"I will wake up in the morning celebrating life in your country ... very young ... younger than you think ... younger than it's stated. I'm younger than I look and younger than the maturity of the music," he said.

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Nine to compete for 20,000 and Music Master title

April 23, 2015

Nine semi-finalists with 10 songs have moved on to the final round of Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival's first Music Masters competition to vie for the $20,000 grand prize and the title Music Master.
Colyn McDonald with two songs (Carnival Is Here and Jump and Carry On), Ericka "Lady E" Symonette (My Islands in the Sun), Sammi Star (Everybody Jump in Da Line), Chris "Sketch" Carey (Rushing Down the Road), Sonovia Pierre (Junkanoo Carnival Party), Bodine Johnson (All day All night), Georgina Ward-Rigby (In the Carnival), Ian McQuay (Going Home) and Tyrone "Plati" Dread (Junkanoo Rock) will duke it out for Junkanoo Carnival music supremacy on May 8.
The finalists were narrowed down from a total of 17 on the Grand Life stage in Grand Bahama over the weekend, before a thousands-strong audience, performing the songs from the 25-song Junkanoo Carnival compilation CD "Jump In Da Line". They will perform their songs on the grand stage in the finale concert with performances by Grammy Award winning Baha Men and Trinidad's soca king Machel Montano.
"We are proud to provide these talented Bahamian artists with a platform such as the Music Masters competition," said CEO of the Bahamas National Festival Commission Roscoe Dames. "Our goal is to celebrate the talent we have in our country's music industry and showcase this to the world.
"These are the nation's next wave of cultural ambassadors who will lead the revitalization of the music industry with their energy, passion and talent."
The competition also included performances by semi-finalists Angelique Sabrina, Terrelle Tynes-Wilson, Khiara Sherman, Val "Sugar" Richards, Raymond Campbell, Raj Saunders and Dwayne Simmons. Dames thanked all the contestants for their participation in the historical competition.
Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival is expected to draw regional musical acts and revelers in a season of unity and festivity from May 7-9 for three days of non-stop food, culture, music and dancing, expected to be one of the most colorful celebrations in the region.
"We're inviting the world to come to The Bahamas and experience one of the most spectacular carnivals in this hemisphere," said Dames. "There is truly something for everyone at Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival 2015. Lots of diverse entertainment and attractions will be available during the Junkanoo Carnival season and we are excited about showcasing all the Bahamian and multi-cultural activities going on during this time."
Kicking off the festival on the Thursday will be Junkamania -- a musical concert of orchestras blending Bahamian Junkanoo music with other folk forms such as drumming and dance, on a live stage in Da Cultural Village, the epicenter of activity during the Junkanoo Carnival season. Throughout the night there will be guest performances by Bahamian contemporary artist Julien Believe, Trinidadian soca artist Bunji Garlin and soca band Visage. A top group out of Haiti will also perform on the night that will culminate with a Midnight Rush, a Junkanoo rush for the people.
On Friday night, the Music Masters concert, the premiere musical event for Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival will have top contemporary artists in The Bahamas competing live in front of thousands for a chance to be crowned the Music Master.
On Saturday merrymakers are expected to take to the road in a lively and vibrant street parade of costumes and dancing to mark the season.
Saturday will also include a taste of Latin America, with a Cuban band flying in to perform as well as soca artists Skinny Fabulous and Olatunji taking to the stage for the finale event at which Bahamian music legend Ronnie Butler will make a rare appearance to perform some of his greatest hits.

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This one is going to be huge

April 23, 2015

From a juggler to a magician, clowns, a contortionist, a hand-balancing act, to a fire dancer who spits fire -- Soft Touch Productions has taken a different tact to its sixth annual circus performance this year with a 12-man troupe out of Cuba, joining two Bahamians for this weekend's must-see family event that has been dubbed "El Grande Circus".
This year's circus will showcase as 12-man troupe out of Cuba with two Bahamians -- contortionist Paige Nixon, and Jewel Holbert with her 14-foot iguana named Don, who has become a highlight of the show, as he's the lone animal, which many children have gravitated to in recent years.
"We are merging Cuba's culture and Bahamians together," said circus promoter David Wallace. "And this year the circus is really to touch the lives of the young and the young-at heart, because many kids will never have an opportunity to go and see a circus. And this is a show where parents can bring their children and even their parents, so we can have three generations sitting down in a room to enjoy it. This one for me is a truly amazing thing."
The show is totally different from last year's show which featured Steven Best and Cassandra, illusionists; and the sword act duo known as Captain and Maybell, self-proclaimed partners in crime who perform classic sideshow entertainment with a contemporary twist, delivering zingers and stingers.
Over the course of the week, the circus has been playing before hundreds of primary school children, twice a day, including a special show for the special children of the country, courtesy of the sponsorship of corporate Bahamas
This year the circus is really to touch the lives of the young and the young-at-heart. Many kids will never have an opportunity to go and see a circus. And what we have found over the years is especially the special children of our country, and so the companies who have again sponsored the children from the Stapledon School for the Mentally Challenged, the Centre for the Deaf, the REACH organization, even the wheelchair-bound kids will light up St. John's auditorium
Tonight and this weekend's shows will be staged at the St. John's College auditorium, with shows at 8 p.m. nightly. Tickets are $15 adults, $12 children, $20 ringside. A family of four gets in on the family rate of $40.
Tickets can be purchased at the Seventeen Shop, Carey's Department Store and The Original Swiss Pastry Shop.

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Dealing with the ups and downs

April 23, 2015

Whenever one takes a voyage at sea you've always got to be prepared for the water to get a little rough at times. Why even in the best of weather there are very strong currents in certain parts of the ocean which create huge swells which lead to excessive ups and downs as the journey continues toward the desired destination. Well this is a very good analogy for our life too as we sail the seas from one day to another on our way to home port, success city. Yes indeed it is a given that we will all experience ups and downs in our life. It's inevitable as that's the way life works, in cycles.
That's right, as we proceed through life, there's absolutely no doubt about it whatsoever, we will experience some good times and some not so good times as the tides of time ebb. So the question which we all ponder is, how do we deal effectively with these inevitable ups and downs, the highs and lows.
Well firstly, just fully understanding the concept as stated already, that the whole universe and our individual life operates in cycles is the very first step in assisting us in dealing with the ups and downs, for we fully understand that "A" we should not get too full of ourselves during the high cycle as we know it will not last forever, and "B" we don't allow ourselves to get down and despondent during the inevitable low periods of our life.
Yes indeed, life is rarely smooth sailing on our way to our desired destination. Of course, the ultimate method of dealing with the ups and downs of life, is to have a very strong spiritual foundation in place. All successful lives need of necessity to be built on a very strong spiritual foundation.
So in the down cycles we just center ourselves and spend some time in quiet meditation with the Creator who can calm us during the stressful times of life and bring us safely back to the sunshine of success and much calmer times.
Think about it!

o Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Sandal's Foundation in Support of PACE Presents:Tarrus Riley & Chronixx Live in Concert on Sandal's Island

April 23, 2015

his fashion in the Old Fort Bay Town Centre and The Mall at Marathon are official vending points for tickets for this weekend's amazing concert!...

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Sony executive to assist with Music Masters judging
Sony executive to assist with Music Masters judging

April 23, 2015

THE Bahamas National Festival Commission yesterday announced that the group has formed a partnership with international entertainment conglomerate Sony Music ahead of the Nassau launch of the inaugural Junkanoo Carnival...

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Junkanoo Carnival Launches in Freeport, Grand Bahama

April 20, 2015

Prime Minister the Rt. Hon. Perry Christie addressed the launch of Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival at Taino Beach in Freeport on Friday night. Joining the Prime Minister at the successful launch were from left: Minister of Tourism the Hon. Obie Wilchcombe, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture the Hon. Dr. Daniel Johnson, CEO of BTC Leon Williams, Minister for Grand Bahama the Hon. Dr. Michael Darville, and Saxons Leader Percy ‘Vola’ Francis. Other photos show some of the good times and performers...

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Bahamas Government thanks the Bahamian people on Grand Bahama Carnival

April 20, 2015

I join the Prime Minister the Rt. Hon. Perry Christie and colleague ministers in expressing our profound thanks to the Bahamian people for their leap of faith and unshakable belief in themselves and their ability to execute a world class show and perform on a world stage before a global audience...

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Mariah Carey relaxes at Resorts World Bimini
Mariah Carey relaxes at Resorts World Bimini

April 17, 2015

AMERICAN singer, songwriter and actress Mariah Carey has been relaxing at Resorts World Bimini before her headlining residency in Las Vegas starts on May 6...

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BNFC announces Rules Regulations for Road Fever Road Fever Event
BNFC announces Rules & Regulations for Road Fever Road Fever Event

April 17, 2015

Only persons in authorized Junkanoo Carnival Company costumes allowed in parade

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Dyson Knight the musician, the man

April 16, 2015

Dyson Knight is on a mission --to make music -- and have his music speak for him. And he continues to do that with the release of his sophomore album "Carnival Day," an album that's a blend of Junkanoo and Rake n' Scrape with a regional feel as he tapped into the Carnival market to add flavor to the sound from a Soca structure.
"Carnival Day", released in early April, is an eight-track album on which half the songs were produced by Dyson himself, and the other half collaborated on with producers out of St. Lucia, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago.
"The concept was to create a blended album...not only the blend of Junkanoo and Rake n' Scrape in the music and structure of music, but a blend in the people working on it so that it could have a regional feel. I wanted to tap into the Carnival market on a world basis, but from the avenue of the Soca structure.
"Rake and Scrape and Rum" is the single on the album, but the road fever song "Every Gal" is getting lots of airtime; and his "Physical Education" track, a collaboration with Julien Believe, has been getting a lot of traction.
Dyson's "Carnival Day" offers something for everyone. It's an album he's proud of. His freshman album "Singles: Volume 1" was released in 2013.

The music according to Dyson Knight
According to Dyson, he is an eclectic, experimental artist who believes strongly in the elements of Rake n' Scrape, and the elements of Junkanoo -- the goatskin flavor, horn action, the baseline -- which he believes could fit into just about any genre of music and become something international. With that in mind, he could see himself being like a Chris Blackwell and Bob Marley and finding the formula that would consistently keep Bahamian music in the mainstream industry, and possibly get it to the point where international artists are doing their versions of Junkanoo music and Rake n' Scrape.

For love of the art and family
A full-time vocalist, Dyson performs with Baha Men and Visage and even has his own self-titled brand "Dyson Knight". Through the three entities he supports himself and his family. But in today's market he says artists barely break even to support themselves and their families.
"I think a lot of the older artists, like the Geno D.'s the K.B.'s, the Ronnie Butler's have been able to -- one because during [days of yesteryear], the cost of living was much cheaper, [and] they were able to afford to buy land and they have these things to sit back on now. In today's market, we're barely breaking even now. I think I'm one of the few ... one of maybe a handful of three or four artists that are full-time musicians. And even still ... me for instance -- I'm a part of Baha Men, I'm a part of Visage, and I have my own brand now as Dyson Knight, and all three of these together only help me to break even. And I still have the help with my [children]. Their mom helps a lot ... it's not like me carrying the entire weight, so it's very difficult in the industry for Bahamian musicians.

Music piracy
Considering the level of music piracy in the industry, Dyson chooses to just put his music out there and make it available everywhere for people to get it -- whether they pirate it or not. For him, it's about getting his name and his music out there so that people request for him to perform, which is where he looks to for the return on his investment.
"The industry has changed," he said. "They used to make millions from album sales, now you would find that a lot of labels aren't even interested in printing records anymore. They're mostly putting out records for digital sale and they just put it out for promotional purposes, and if it gets pirated -- then fine. They try to limit it as much as possible, but they understand that it's just out of their control now with the Internet, and they try to buy into the performance aspect of it, so the tour is what's selling now [and] every label that would usually have stayed out of the touring business are now in the touring business and are executive producing tours. I put my music out there. I put it on SoundCloud, I put it on YouTube, I make it available on iTunes and everywhere where people can get it, whether they pirate it or not, because it's about getting the name out there, getting the music in the air, and getting myself popular, so that I would be requested to perform, and that's where I look for the return now on my investment, because you do invest a lot into production of a song."

Looking back and looking ahead
Dyson's career in entertainment began in 1997 -- fresh out of college with a Bachelor's degree in computer science -- he took the job as an entertainment coordinator at the Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort. That job opened the doors for him to become the Dyson Knight that he is today, even though he was taught music at an early age from his father, Vernon Knight, an eighth degree oboe player who Dyson describes as a wise and sharp musician, but also a wise and sharp person.
"He [Vernon] encouraged me to go to college and have something to fall back on," said Dyson. "His [Vernon's] only real job in music was with the Police Band, and he didn't want me on the [Police] Force. He was like you have to do something different."
By his own admission, Dyson said he was "kind or forced" into his computer science studies because it was more affordable to get a degree in, and that the music chose him. If he had an option, which meant having more money, he would have gone the route of studying towards a law degree.
Through the entertainment coordinator's position he met the resort's house band, the VIP Band, and started doing shows with them. He then met T'rez Hepburn and started doing back up dancing for her. He then recorded a Soca song produced by Colyn McDonald and Christopher Strachan that got him into the Extra band and the Bahamian music arena. T'rez introduced the young Dyson to Kirkland "K.B." Bodie who had Dyson perform a remake of Blind Blake's song "Yes, Yes, Yes" on his "K.B. and Friends" album. Dyson says that was his start.
Looking ahead to the future he says he would consider himself a success if an artist coming behind him, or even if one of his children decided to pursue music, if they could stand on what he had accomplished, and not have to start out at where he started as an entertainment coordinator.

Musical influences
For the 30-something Dyson, his musical influences were all international in youth. That was all he was exposed to.
"I grew up on Boys II Men, Brian McKnight, Usher ... Mint Condition. My first album that I bought was Tony! Toni! Tone! -- their anniversary album that I bought on cassette tape ... the last era of the cassette tape, after which it was the mini disc and then CDs, so I have watched the music industry change," he said.
"As a child I remember Goombay and the excitement of it, but I don't remember any artists performing. I just remember it was an exciting time. Until I was an adult and went to Bimini for a homecoming, that was my first like wow moment with Bahamian music -- actually seeing it performed, understanding where the lyrics came from, and the vibe behind it and that's what really birthed my extreme interest in the music."
Since his introduction to Bahamian musicians he now counts Ronnie Butler, K.B., Ray Munnings, the VIP Band, Tony Fisher, T'rez Hepburn, Berkley Van Byrd, and Jay Mitchell among his influences. And he says when he joined Baha Men his music went to the next level as far as musical structure was concerned with Isaiah Taylor.

Dyson the man
Dyson has his public persona, but he also has a private side, and if there's one thing he would like people to know, it's that Dyson Knight is not a perfect person, but that his aim is always to be better tomorrow than he was today. He also believes in staying positive and making the best out of every situation, especially musically.
"You have your down times, and your moments when you feel like you want to quit and want to give up, but you go through that, shake it off and keep your eye on what it is you want people to know you as, and not for the sake of not being real. You want people to know that you are this person from the inside out, not from what they expect of you. And I want to be accepted as me so that I don't have to pretend to be anything else."

Next up
With two albums down, Dyson already has material for his third album because he never stops writing and producing. He says it will be just as eclectic as his first and that he will do a cover or two on it paying respect and honoring some of the country's great musicians like Eddie Minnis and Ronnie Butler.

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Bahamian recording artist readies to release summer album

April 16, 2015

Padrino celebrated his 34th birthday sitting behind a mixer board at a studio in North Miami. It's likely he turned 32 and 33 doing much of the same.
His album project entitled "RNIP" is due to drop by the end of this summer, and he still has a lot of work to do. But, he and Grammy-award winning executive producers, Cool and Dre, have a plan to release singles all summer long -- the appetizers until the serving of the main course.
His long career of producing other people's tracks, and laying down his own, have finally come to a critical precipice -- he is about to drop an album in the biggest hip hop market in the world. And he stands on the edge of either the biggest success of his life, or faces the long walk back to the drawing board. He has proven, however, that what he will not do is quit.
Musically, the last two-and-a-half years have been rewarding for Padrino, who went by the name Rory Bowe. However, the last few years have also been some of the hardest years of his life.
"There has been a loss of loved ones, times that I wanted to quit, and there have been times when I worked my butt off and still wasn't able to do the things that I wanted to do financially," he said. "It's been rough. It's been very rough. This is the first time that I've actually stayed out of the streets. The music business is not easy ... it's been very stressing. Being told over the years that you're not good enough causes you to stop believing in yourself."
Padrino says that in his new album he and his music have come into their "manhood" while leaving the hood or gangster feel behind.
In the struggle to improve himself as an artist he honed his vocals, and his fans can expect a lot more singing from him on the upcoming album.
He made his start from humble beginnings in The Bahamas, and became the biggest name in producing. He was once recognized as the country's top producer. His tracks have been featured on every radio station, and his monster track "Duffles" debuted to rave reviews due to its accompanying music video shot on Norman's Cay, New Providence and Paradise Island.
Even as he works toward his dream in the United States (U.S.), he is still sought out by Bahamian artists who only want him to produce their tracks. Up-and-coming Bahamian artist, Chase Fernander, recently release a song produced by Padrino. The hot track has been making the rounds on Bahamian radio stations for several weeks and has been well received. He has also worked with artists out of Grand Bahama.
His album, however, has been non-stop work and growth for him, with Cool and Dre at the helm steering him in the right direction. And it has been a period of maturity and humility for him, personally.
"This album has been a work in progress for two-and-a-half years, but recently it took a turn for a much bigger and better direction after the addition of Cool and Dre," said Padrino. "You can expect a really grown-up type of feel. You can expect a lot of tempered emotion, rage, anger and pain. The old Padrino was more aggressive, this Padrino is more calm and grown up. It's not about the gangster stuff for me anymore; it's more about what kind of records can I leave behind that will be lasting. It's not about having a two-week record anymore. It's about having a record that will last 20 years that my kids will be able to eat from."
Cool and Dre, who have produced for artists like Christina Milian, Rick Ross and the Game, belive in Padrino's potential to be the next best thing on the hip hop scene in the U.S., and eventually, globally.
"We've been in the studio for the past few weeks putting together an amazing body of work," Cool and Dre said in a statement. "We feel like he has the potential to be one of the greats, and we're really excited about his project."
Cool and Dre are the executive producers on Padrino's "RNIP", while well-known engineer Brian Stanley is expected to mix-down the album when Padrino puts the period on the final lyric. Stanley, who also hails from the Caribbean, said he is always excited to work on projects with fellow Caribbean people.
"I can't wait until we start releasing some of this music to the general public," said Stanley. "I love to see when island and Caribbean people take the world by storm and let the world know that no matter how small of a country you are from, you can do great things."
According to Padrino, Cool and Dre have brought a family atmosphere to his studio time and he insists that it shows in his music.
"Expect to hear a lot of amazing music from Padrino," said the Cool and Dre statement. "We think he is going to be a force to be reckoned with when it comes to this music business and The Bahamas has got to get ready because he's about to put the hip hop music scene on the map as far as The Bahamas is concerned. In the U.S. market and worldwide, we think he's going to be a huge artist."
He has also been rubbing shoulders with big name artists -- with rumors growing that Game could be featured on one or two of his tracks. The Kaos Records camp, the label under which Padrino performs, would not confirm or deny that collaboration.
Padrino has been seen with performers such as Miami rapper Gunplay and 90s sensation Snow.
"Right away I heard his stuff and said I'd love to work with him," said Snow. "He is definitely going to put The Bahamas on the map. His music, his form and his rap style are incredible, and he has a beautiful voice too."
Padrino was surrounded by talent as he celebrated his birthday at Cool and Dre's studio. Fat Joe was busy laying down tracks in one recording room, while Padrino and his team went over some of his tracks.
"We're working hard to bring Padrino to the U.S. market and then bring him to the world," said Kaos Records principal, Ted Kay. "But, we're waving that Bahamian flag all the way."
While Padrino has spent a lot of time in the U.S. working on his album, he has never forgotten home. On a recent trip he shot a music video, and lounged at the Compass Point Resort, which has a music studio attached to it (a perfect refuge for Padrino).
"I embrace my country and I only want the best for my country," said Padrino. "I hope to inspire dudes that were once like me. These have been the hardest years of my life, I just want to make things better."

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An amusing mixed bag of stereotypes and comedy clichs

April 16, 2015

Get Hard (Rated C)
Cast: Will Ferrell, Kevin Hart, Craig T. Nelson, T.I.
Genre: Comedy
Dwight's Rating: 2.5 Stars
A secret organization examining extraterrestrial activity on earth;
a regular Joe Blow given God-like powers to see firsthand the daily challenges facing the Almighty; a man accidentally sent back in time and meets his teenage parents.
The plot lines in some of the biggest film comedies of all time have often been based on preposterous, highly unlikely plots. In fact, most of the top-grossing movie comedies are animated films.
Television too, has a tradition of successful, long-running sitcoms based on the bizarre. From weird "monsters" living in the suburbs, talking horses, a family living with a weird furry alien from a far-away planet, to even a whole family of aliens posing as human beings.
We've been able to suspend all sense of reality to accept these stories, often because we like something about the characters or, quite simply, because these movies or TV shows are genuinely funny.
You'll be called on to suspend a lot of your thought processes for the new comedy, "Get Hard". It does have a lot going for itself, bringing together one of the biggest comedy stars of the last decade, Will Ferrell, with one of today's hottest comedians, Kevin Hart -- who's shaping up (by box-office numbers) to be one of the biggest comedy stars of this decade. However, to best appreciate their film, you'll need to ignore some very giant plot holes.
Though nowhere near as outlandish as some of the genre's best comedies, it becomes very obvious quite early on that this is based on a massively faulty foundation. There is a difference between quirky or eccentric and just plain dumb. And for many "Get Hard" may just be too dumb.
After he is convicted for fraud, white millionaire hedge fund manager James King (Ferrell) asks black businessman Darnell Lewis (Hart) -- who has never been to jail -- to prepare him for his time behind bars. Before he is to be sent to the infamous San Quentin State Prison, James is given 30 days to get his affairs in order.
Therein lies the first problem (and Bahamians should find this aspect especially amusing). While James is placed on an ankle-bracelet monitoring program for these 30-days, and his assets are frozen, for some inexplicable reason his passport is not taken.
Of course he attempts to make a run for it. It's when that fails that instead of trying to clear his name, he decides to focus on getting prepared for his time in jail.
He enlists Darnell -- who washes cars -- for help because he assumes that he's been to prison just because he's black. Darnell doesn't correct him, because he hopes he can make some money. It's all very strange, and for some, probably quite off-putting.
But once all of that nonsense gets out of the way, "Get Hard" settles into a very funny, odd couple-esque buddy comedy. The scenes in which Darnell is helping James to "get hard" for prison, are replete with laugh-out-loud and amusingly awkward moments. It is all very silly, but often hilarious.
Surprisingly, and contrary to a horrible trend sweeping the movie industry, the funniest moments are not what we'd seen in the film's omnipresent trailers and commercials.
Ferrell plays James and is just as clueless and unaware as his character in "Elf". James' life of privilege has left him oblivious to what's happening outside his word, and he's hopelessly out-of-touch. Ferrell's performance is -- compared to some of his other movies -- surprisingly and refreshingly restrained. If you've watched many of his films, you know he tends to go well beyond over-the-top.
Hart, too, is learning the art of the easy touch. Here he's not as obnoxious as he's been in some previous roles, finding the sweet spot between his saccharine effervescence in last year's unpleasant, "Ride Along", and his stellar but acid-tongued enthusiasm in the much, much better, "About Last Night". It's a vast improvement compared to nearly unwatchable and lackluster "The Wedding Ringer" earlier this year.
Their scenes are heavy on physical comedy, but some of the lines are zingers as well. And Farrell and Hart play reasonably well off each other.
A big challenge for some will be the film's heavy reliance on some very serious racial stereotypes. Seemingly no group is immune -- black, white, the poor, the rich, white supremacists, gays, Hispanics. Most of the jabs are probably not meant to offend, as it appears the film is holding up a mirror to society. But in today's politically correct world, many are thin-skinned and may not be able to appreciate the humor.
In any event, things begin to fall down by the third act -- a malady afflicting a great many of the comedies so far this century. The story moves from getting ready for prison, to trying to prove James' innocence. And it quickly becomes as generic as every last R-rated comedy over the past two decades. If you've watched, "The Hangover" or "Horrible Bosses" or anything starring Seth Rogen or Jonah Hill or even Kevin Hart, you'll be hit with that "been there, done that" feeling.
Never mind all that though! Accept it for what it is, and don't read too much into what it's not, and "Get Hard" could be good for more than a few good laughs.

o Dwight Strachan is the host/producer of " Morning Blend" on Guardian Radio. He is a television producer and writer, and an avid TV history and film buff. Email dwight@nasguard.com and follow him on

twitter @morningblend969.

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Seasons change

April 16, 2015

As I am writing this article we have just about left winter behind and are now entering the season of spring, a season where new life abounds everywhere. It's also a season when new ideas start to grow in our fertile mind, which will eventually bloom and blossom into the fruits of success in due season. Yes indeed, we're all familiar with the four seasons of the year when major changes in the weather usually take place.
Of course living in the warm climates like I do -- for example living in The Bahamas, perhaps the changes in the seasons are not so dramatic, so pronounced as they are in the colder climes, like living in England and Ireland in my younger years. However, the main point is that we're all fully acquainted with the four seasons -- spring, summer, autumn and winter.
Well my friend, in living our lives, we could quite correctly state, that we also experience seasons -- the seasons of life -- each one bringing its set of difficulties and blessings to deal effectively with. However, the most important point that I wish to make here today is this.
As we all know, the seasons of the year are constantly changing. Well my friend, likewise, the seasons of your life will also be subject to constant change. Yes indeed, as today's short title simply states, seasons change. Yes they do, for that's the way the universe and everything in it, including your personal life operates.
So my main message today is this -- if you're presently in a bad season, take heart, for a brand new season of your life is obviously on its way packed with the seeds of success.
I guess that another practical way of looking at how life works, and in particular today's lesson, is that nothing lasts forever as everything in life is subject to change as new seasons come into existence. Yes my friend, seasons change, so if you're right now in a bad season, a very cold season with not too much growth taking place, take heart, for the next season is already on its way as life proceeds on schedule from season to season, and so does the growth cycle. So just relax knowing that a new season of growth is on its way for you and your life.
Think about it!

o Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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