Culture

BNFC Releases Subsidies to Youth Culture Fest Organizations
BNFC Releases Subsidies to Youth Culture Fest Organizations

March 26, 2015

Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Danny Johnson says costume parade to kick-off a week of events and Baha Mar’s opening.

The Bahamas National Festival Commission on Wednesday released subsidy cheques to 24 youth organizations participating in the Youth Culture Fest in Nassau this May 1, where hundreds of youngsters will showcase indigenous costumes for locals and visitors alike.

The distribution of funds will propel the organizations into the production phase of their projects, teaming up with designers and indigenous Bahamian material suppliers to outfit youngsters in costumes depicting different islands and various themes from around The Bahamas.

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Transforming Spaces 2015 kicks off

March 20, 2015

The 2015 Transforming Spaces season kicked off on Thursday, March 19 with two panel discussions at The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB).
The first talk, titled "So money", was led by Jay Koment and Uli Voges, who hoped to examine art entrepreneurism and developing a successful business as a visual artist. As the director of New Providence Art and Antiques and the co-founder of Transforming Spaces, Koment is no stranger to giving guidance on topics like branding, pricing and legal protection. An international art dealer, founder of the former Galeries Voges + Partner (Frankfurt, Germany) and co-founder of both VOLTA Basel and VOLTA New York, Voges is also well-versed in advising artists on developing their professional networks and building rapport with clientele and audiences.
Focusing on the strategic methods artists should use to promote themselves, Koment and Voges honed in on the visual arts economy from both international and Bahamian perspectives. Ceramicist and NAGB Curatorial Assistant Averia Wright found the talk enlightening.
"It's an important conversation to have because, working at the National Art Gallery, we always have
issues with artists and how they go about dealing with the business aspect of their careers," explained Wright. "Money is an important part of the career, and we should be able to support ourselves through our talents rather than going through a completely different field and doing art on the side."
The second discussion, titled "You belong here", was led by Baha Mar Public Relations and Communications Strategist Royann Dean. NAGB Director Amanda Coulson and College of The Bahamas Dean of Liberal and Fine Arts Dr. Ian Bethell-Bennett served as panelists on the talk centered on the connection between visual arts and the hospitality industry.
The panelists touched on Baha Mar's unprecedented focus on the local visual arts community, which has already had an effect on Bahamian artists, many of whom have been commissioned to create pieces for the mega resort. Other topics included the importance of understanding trade agreements between The Bahamas, the Caribbean and European nations.
Dr. Bethell-Bennett explained the ease with which European Union citizens are able to migrate to The Bahamas and work, compared to the process Bahamians, particularly Bahamian artists, undergo when moving to the Continent for work.
"It seems to be a one-way channel and not a two-way channel," said COB Assistant Professor of Art Michael Edwards. "The successive government administrations sign on to these things without explaining fully to their citizens what these agreements may mean down the road."
NAGB Director Coulson took the chance to encourage locals and private Bahamian institutions to take initiative in lobbying for change and projects that would benefit the Bahamian art community, rather than relying on government leadership.

o The Transforming Spaces 2015 art tour takes place today and tomorrow. To find out more about Transforming Spaces, visit http://www.bahamastransformingspaces.com.

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Members of the Caribbean visual art community demonstrate unity, progression at Tilting Axis conference

March 20, 2015

Dedicated to forging infrastructure between independent art organizations and museums operating across the Caribbean, U.S., E.U., U.K., African continent and China, the international visual arts conference, "Tilting Axis: Within and beyond the Caribbean - shifting models of sustainability and connectivity", was held recently in Barbados.
A two-day event, Tilting Axis was held over February 27 and 28 and was coordinated by the Fresh Milk Art Platform, Inc. in collaboration with ARC Magazine, Res Artis and the Pe?rez Art Museum, Miami.
Founding Director of Fresh Milk Annalee Davis noted Tilting Axis' potential to serve as a catalyst to unite the Caribbean in a movement that could strengthen the region's visual arts voice.
"Many of us working in the region have been speaking with one another, in some cases for many years, but today is the first time that artist-led initiatives have come together from the Dutch, Spanish, French and English territories to meet physically in the Caribbean. It is critical that this gathering is taking place on Caribbean soil, and that we consider the visual arts sector from within the archipelago as a counterpoint to the many decisions that have been and are often made about the region externally," she said in her welcome address.
At the conference, leaders in the visual arts movements in their respective communities convened to negotiate strategic regional and international alliances for the formalization and further development of Caribbean art. More than 30 visual art professionals from neighboring Caribbean countries and nations as far away as Senegal came together in the hopes of developing a strategic plan for continued collaboration. Doing her part for The Bahamas and international art fair VOLTA NY was National Art Gallery of The Bahamas Amanda Coulson, who represented the country's local art community at the convention.
Deborah Anzinger, the director of Jamaican visual art initiative NLS, underscored the importance of one of the conference's objectives - that of broadening and improving access to the region's visual art markets.
"In creating markets for contemporary art in the Caribbean, we are developing the ecosystem and all the underlying components that drive that market, [including] the environment for artists to make great work; art writers, researchers and funders to help make that work accessible to the public; international museums and galleries to show the work; advisors and dealers to get the work placed in collections. Shared programming, exchanges and educational initiatives developed between the institutions present address these key components," said Anzinger.
It is hoped that Tilting Axis and its ongoing reverberation will create opportunities for visual artists living in the Caribbean and contribute to professional and economic development in the region via the creation of formal collaborations between key art institutions and organizations throughout the Caribbean.
"As more eyes are turning to look at this space, we need to be cognizant of what they are seeing, and consider how and what we want them to experience. Tilting Axis aspires to become a conduit; supporting the professionalization of artists and formalizing engagements, leading to greater visibility and accessibility of contemporary Caribbean art," said Holly Bynoe, ARC Magazine co-founder and Tilting Axis administrative team member.
To find out more about Tilting Axis, email Bynoe or Davis at tiltingaxis@gmail.com.

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NAGB hosts third intern of 2015

March 20, 2015

St. John's High School student Sherelle Hutcheson was The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas' (NAGB) third intern of 2015. Referred to the NAGB by her guidance counsellor, who recognized the 11th grader's creative ambitions, Hutcheson spent the week at the gallery shadowing curatorial and educational staff.
She, like many Bahamians, was unfamiliar with the gallery, its history and purpose. The internship offered her first-time exposure to the National Collection and the daily lives of gallery staff.
"When I first came here, I thought people were going to be enclosed in their own areas and keep to themselves. I thought everyone was an artist," she recalled. "I didn't expect the works in the gallery to be the way they are. I was really surprised to see how varied it is. When we got to the second floor and I noticed the installations, I was impressed. I didn't think that kind of work would be here. I was surprised it was all by Bahamian artists."
The intern, who hopes to pursue art photography, used her time at the NAGB to expose herself to a variety of media and art forms beyond sketching and painting, both of which she has done before. Skimming her way through shelves of exhibition catalogues and research materials in the NAGB library, Hutcheson stumbled across literature on one of the country's most respected artists.
"I read about Max Taylor. I enjoy looking at his printmaking. I just found out about that technique because I didn't know about it before. When I looked at his work, I got a better understanding of it and I went on YouTube and got an idea of how to do it," she explained, adding that she'd like to learn to make prints under formal instruction.
His was not the only work that caught Hutcheson's eye. Kishan Munroe's "If I Ever Rise" which hangs in the gallery's permanent exhibition, Bahamian Domestic, made her look twice. Taking several guesses at the painting's media (acrylic on canvas), she settled on the work as her favorite piece at the gallery.
"I like how much detail there is and how big it is," she explained.
The Burnside-Beadle-Burnside collaborative work, "Enigmatick Funktification" was a close second. The work, which featured as the NAGB's January Artwork of the Month, is easily identified as one of the gallery's largest paintings. It occupies an entire wall in Bahamian Domestic. The technique used to create the piece - known as "Jammin" - originated in humble Junkanoo shacks and is based on the method of producing a single Junkanoo costume under as many as six pairs of hands simultaneously. It, along with five other Burnside-Beadle-Burnside works, traveled to the 1996 Olympic Games. After making its rounds, it returned home and now sits in the gallery's permanent exhibition space.
The painting's synergetic nature impressed Hutcheson.
"I like how the three of them worked on it and they brought their ideas together to make one piece," she said.
The impressive body of works making up Bahamian Domestic demonstrates the quality of fine art being produced in the country, as Hutcheson noticed. Encouraging more Bahamians to visit, she also hopes they will "do some research and keep an open mind" while in the space.
"I was surprised by content of the work - how much meaning there is inside one painting. When you look at a work, at first, you could just have one interpretation, but there can be many different types of interpretations and there can be different meanings and reasons behind the work. It's influenced by what's happened in the country and throughout history."

o To find out more about the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas' educational resources and learning opportunities, contact Education Officer Corinne Lampkin at clampkin@nagb.org.bs or Education and Curatorial Support Associate Abby Smith at asmith@nagb.org.bs, or call 328-5800/1.

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GB Minister Tours New Junkanoo Village and Museum

March 20, 2015

Minister for Grand Bahama, the Hon. Dr. Michael Darville on Thursday visited the Junkanoo Village and Museum and observed the progress of Freeport’s newest attraction, the brainchild of Junkanoo enthusiast Fred Black and his partner Rashad Amahad, located on Yellow Pine Street, directly across the street from the Grand Bahama Millwork Building...

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The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture (MOYS&C) with Lyn Terez Davis- Nixon "Miss Daisy"

March 19, 2015

The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture (MOYS&C) with Lyn Terez Davis-Nixon "Miss Daisy" and her team members paid a courtesy call on Her Excellency Governor General Dame Marguerite Pindling at Government House, March 17...

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Culture before politics

March 18, 2015

Dear Editor,

Like I said from the outset of this debate on this carnival, or Junkanoo Carnival idea, was that I will not support it as long as it is a Trinidadian soca-styled event. I protested, argued and was chastised for it. And after all the battling, the government has finally decided that it will "Bahamianize" the event going forward and into the future...

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Re-membering the past

March 13, 2015

Teaming up to transform part of the grounds at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB) this year are cousins, College of The Bahamas Assistant Professor of Sociology Nicolette Bethel and artist and designer Margot Bethel, who will be assembling a representation of a former family home. The artwork was originally planned as a piece for the Seventh National Exhibition, Antillean: an Ecology, but the project had to be delayed due to conflicting schedules.
Each year, the Transforming Spaces bus tour unveils thought-provoking transformations in galleries and creative spaces across New Providence. This year, the tour will be held over March 21 and 22 and will treat explorers to metamorphosed areas at Hillside House, Doongalik Studios, PopopStudios, the D'Aguilar Art Foundation, The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB) and Liquid Courage Gallery. While the Transforming Spaces works are normally only exhibited over the weekend, the Bethels' installation will continue to exist for several months at the NAGB.
Transforming Spaces 2015 has set itself apart from previous years by foregoing a universal theme, giving participating artists more sovereignty than ever before. Artists have been asked to use each gallery's history, location and position in the context of Bahamian society as inspiration for transforming the space.
The Bethels' family house, known for more than a century as 672 Bay Street, was the childhood home of both women's fathers. Their paternal grandmother lived in the property for 70 years, and it originally belonged to her mother-in-law. Ten years ago, the home was demolished without notice or permission.
"In February 2005, I drove past my grandmother's house on East Bay Street to find a bulldozer sitting on top of it," wrote Nicolette Bethel on her blog, nicobethel.net.
"We had not booked any bulldozer. We had no intention of demolishing the house. My cousin Margot and I had, in fact, begun the long, slow process of renovation."
Hoping to salvage pieces of the home, Margot Bethel combed the wreckage for shutters, window frames and timbers of Abaco pine. Her findings - stored in a shipping container onsite - were hauled away, also without notice or permission.
"Subsequently, looters took the limestone that the house had been raised upon and also the ones forming the cistern on the western side of the house. Still, other pieces were removed from another location Margot had stored them at and taken for garbage. Whatever is left are remnants," said Nicolette Bethel.
The Bethels' transformative piece involves words; poems; original possessions from the home, including family Bibles, photographs, tea cups and journals, and a model of a portion of the demolished home. Both women will be evoking their respective knowledge of theatre and thespian experiences in the transformation.
"I have many years' experience building and designing for both film and theatre, and, naturally, Nicolette is a playwright, director and theatre festival founder," said Margot Bethel. "Theatre and drama are important components of the piece because of the way they connect to the narrative side of the project and the fact that we are not only remembering but also using new found objects to represent others that were lost. We are, essentially, writing and re-writing our familial histories, so the installation may have the distinct feel of a theatre set."
Titled "If", the installation's name evokes emotions like longing and regret.
"It was also used by our family as a means of expressing emphatic agreement, as in, 'Did it hurt?' 'If!' Or, 'Did you look fabulous?' 'If!'" explained Nicolette Bethel, who added that "If" will be a work in progress.
Designed to be a 'living' piece that will continue to evolve even after the 2015 tour has completed, the artists will be adding to, re-working and exploring new perspectives of the installation in months to come. Nicolette Bethel hopes it will "do justice to the memories of those who have gone before".
"I hope that our relatives will be moved by what we recall, and I hope we pay homage to what is great in the most humble bits of our past."
"I hope people get a sense of a family whose lives are neither simplified nor distilled. I hope they see the diversity, even the messiness of our collective histories as people who inhabit and have inhabited these islands, and I hope people see how we are not always what we are seen to be," added Margot Bethel.

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'Cul-De-Sac' by Dave Smith is NAGB's artwork of the month

March 13, 2015

We start most of our tours at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB) downstairs, in the space showcasing our permanent exhibition, Bahamian Domestic. A show centered on portraying everyday life in The Bahamas, Bahamian Domestic includes visual representations of the places Bahamians live, work and play. It also takes a deeper look at some of the social issues that The Bahamas still grapples with today. For locals and international visitors, it serves as a comprehensive overview of works by some of the country's younger and more established artists.
While many of Bahamian Domestic's works attract wandering eyes, one of the paintings that draws the most attention is Dave Smith's 2010 "Cul-De-Sac".
Known as a pop realist, Smith's work is recognizable through the presence of vibrant colors, American cars and the juxtaposition of the idealized Bahamian landscape and unpleasant realities. His work continues to be exhibited and collected in The Bahamas, and currently six of his paintings hang at the NAGB. One of those pieces is "Cul-De-Sac", which hangs in the part of Bahamian Domestic curated by former NAGB Archives Manager Ashley Knowles.
The painting shows on one side a well kept home in what is presumed to be a quiet and secure neighborhood on a sunny day. As is common with Dave Smith pieces, a curtain, operating as a barrier, splits the painting into two halves. The second half of the painting is cast in shadowy darkness. A partially obscured picture of Christ is situated above
imagery of a sexual assault being committed by a well-dressed man on a woman.
The elements present in "Cul-De-Sac" - the image of Christ, the tranquil home and sexual violence - are also ever present throughout The Bahamas. The country, which touts itself as both a Christian nation and paradise, also ails from distressingly high rates of domestic and sexual violence. Marital rape is a non-issue in The Bahamas. Gender rights groups have rightly expressed outrage at the level of seriousness attributed to domestic violence; others believe it to be a problem confined only to lower-income families.
Smith's "Cul-De-Sac" is meant to spark curiosity and provoke the reactions it has about the country's illicit problems that coexist with the marketable image of paradise. Like many of the works in Bahamian Domestic, the piece is a social commentary on the dualities that prevail in the country.

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NAGB's 2015 Easter egg hunt

March 13, 2015

The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB) will be hosting an Easter egg hunt for kids ages 12 and under on Saturday, April 4.
Next month, youngsters are invited to join the NAGB team from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., for a few hours of basket weaving, candy searching, face painting and seasonal festivities. The cost of $10 per child includes admission and a snack and drink. The deadline for registration and payment is Wednesday, April 1.

o For more information, contact Education and Curatorial Support Associate Abby Smith at 328-5800 or asmith@nagb.org.bs.

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On Day 5 of the E.Clement Bethel National Arts Festival at the Grand Lucayan

March 10, 2015

On Day 5 of the E. Clement Bethel National Arts Festival at the Grand Lucayan, in Freeport, March 9, drama and instrumental music – piano and violin – featured prominently...

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A vanishing act

March 06, 2015

In 2010, Caribbean Bottling Company - the local bottler of Coca-Cola - and the Downtown Nassau Partnership (DNP) collaborated in an initiative geared toward putting the country's visual art scene on the Downtown Nassau map. Spread over 15 months, the Love My Bahamas Campaign introduced works of art - mainly murals and sculptures - to walls and cleared spaces throughout the small city, which hosts thousands of international visitors and locals every day.
In an interview at the time, then DNP Managing Director Vaughn Roberts called the project a "life changing" one. "I don't think there has ever been a more exciting time for art, and this is the first time we have ever had anything of this magnitude," he said.
The artwork, produced by 15 artists - 13 Bahamians and two Americans - could be found on the Frederick Street Steps, along Woodes Rogers Walk and Bay Street and on side streets woven throughout the city. Both tourists and locals were seen on any given day taking pictures of the commissioned pieces, which offered vibrancy against the formerly easily overlooked bare sidewalks and walls. The creators included John Beadle, Chantal Bethel, Lillian Blades, John Cox, Claudette Dean, Tyrone Ferguson, Maya Hayuk, Toby Lunn, Jace McKinney, Kishan Munroe, Antonius Roberts, Jolyon Smith, Allan Wallace, Arjuna Watson and Daniel Weise. It was hoped that their talents would bring new life and interest to historic Nassau.
At the time, DNP Co-chairman Charles Klonaris praised the campaign's rejuvenating effect. "The art has changed the cityscape of Nassau and provided visitors with something new to look at, talk about and photograph," he said. "It has given rise to a new reason to do a walking tour. Anything that adds to the visitor experience is good for us as a destination and should be celebrated."
Backed with harmonious approval and encouragement, the energetic sites spurred curiosity about the country's visual art movement and Bahamian culture beyond the beach. With that in mind, it's a shame that today few of the 15 artworks can be admired the same way they were five years ago. In recent times, many of the works have been silently removed, painted over or left to disintegrate, leaving some questioning motives and others conjuring up distant memories of images that once were.
"I don't know if it was purposeful. It just seemed to be, one by one, you saw them kind of disappear," said artist Dionne Benjamin-Smith, who commented on the most recent removals affecting Jace McKinney's and Jolyon Smith's murals.
"With this new incident, where Jolyon's piece and Jace McKinney's piece have been taken down, we have no idea what happened. That happened in the last few weeks," she said.
According to Benjamin-Smith, the latest incidents are not the first in what some have viewed as social and historical neglect and dismissal of the country's arts community. Following the destruction of the Nassau Straw Market in 2001, government officials cordoned off the charred site with sheets of plywood that traced the space along Bay Street and Prince George Wharf.
"The Ministry of Tourism commissioned artists to paint on these boards," recalled Benjamin-Smith. "They were up for quite a while. They were beautiful. Tourists would be taking pictures in front of it; it was gorgeous. And one day we saw they had been taken down and nobody knew where they were."
To this day, many artists, particularly those whose talents and efforts went into creating the murals on the plywood boards, wonder about the location and condition of their works.
In separate incidents, Stephen Burrows' famous oversized pigeon and rooster sculptures that jazzed up New Providence's roundabouts were removed, largely due to their states of disrepair after years of neglect, some argue. This story might bring another sculpture to mind - a gift from the Mexican government, formerly located on East Hill Street, which decayed without adequate protection from the elements.
If a work by one of the country's senior artists were to disappear from the shelves of the country's prominent art collectors, there would be widespread concern throughout the art community. If it were left to deteriorate without adequate care, there might be legal action. It is a wonder, then, how the quiet removal and neglect of many public artworks has continued throughout New Providence, particularly in the downtown area.
Those who notice the absence of the vivid pieces and miss their rejuvenating effects have been left with a bitter taste regarding the seemingly fleeting nature of public artwork in the country, which Benjamin-Smith believes "goes to show a fundamental lack of valuing the nation's artwork and public artwork".

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COB departments team up to transform the NAGB

March 06, 2015

This year, College of The Bahamas (COB) students and faculty are bridging gaps and celebrating autonomy through group work in the 2015 Transforming Spaces. The annual art tour unveiling thought-provoking transformations in galleries and creative spaces across New Providence will this year be held over March 21 and 22. The 2015 Transforming Spaces bus tour will treat explorers to metamorphosed areas at Hillside House, Doongalik Studios, PopopStudios, the D'Aguilar Art Foundation, The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB) and Liquid Courage Gallery.
However, unlike previous years, Transforming Spaces 2015 has set itself apart by foregoing a universal theme, giving participating artists more sovereignty than ever before.
Artists have been asked to use each gallery's history, location and position in the context of Bahamian society as inspiration for transforming the space.
Seeing the opportunity to "transcend departments", COB Assistant Professor of Art Michael Edwards and his students are collaborating with COB architecture lecturers Valaria Flax and Henry Hepburn, architect Michael Diggiss and students of COB's architecture program to transform the space at the NAGB. Approximately 20 students in total, most of whom are architecture students, will join forces to construct an art pavilion on the lawn of the NAGB. Theirs will be one of two constructions transforming the gallery's outdoor space, with Nicolette and Margot Bethel creating a second, unrelated work.
"We want to engender more collaboration between students, between departments of the university. We're very cognizant of the fact that departments still exist in huge silos, and we want to deconstruct those silos to encourage more thinking across disciplines, to encourage more interdisciplinary work," explained Edwards.
Architecture students have used the knowledge acquired in class to design the pavilion, having regard to available space and elements like light and air; they will also be responsible for the physical construction of the building, which will be composed of plywood. Art students have taken control over decorating the pavilion's blank spaces with paintings and sketches. Both sets of students will be graded on their efforts in the challenge.
"Think about the name, in and of itself - it's about transforming a space - so I thought it was a really good idea to bring design to the table and have design as a part of the conversation," said Edwards. "Last year, Collins House was the first iteration of this idea of art pavilions. When you think about art fairs, there's often an art pavilion that's incorporated, where an architect will collaborate with the artists. So this collaboration has always been a part of these kinds of fairs."
The project is largely supported by the D'Aguilar Art Foundation, and Edwards believes the new direction taken by Transforming Spaces and the college's collaborative initiative is indicative of future Transforming Spaces events.
"We think this is where Transforming Spaces ought to go. We're thinking five years ahead. We're thinking down the line," he said.
"I think this philosophy of working across departments, problem solving and coming up with solutions is the way forward," he added. "We get bogged down in our monolithic ways of thinking, and we want to bridge disciplines and thought processes to work on these kinds of projects."
Tickets for Transforming Spaces can be purchased for $35 from Doongalik Studios, on Village Road, or The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas, on West and West Hill Streets. Bussed tours of the transformed spaces will be held from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. and 2 - 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 21, and 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. on Sunday, March 22. Members of the public are welcomed and encouraged to attend the week's highlights, which include a public talks forum on Thursday, March 19, at the NAGB and an opening party at Hillside House on Friday, March 20.

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Culture minister suggests no headliner needed for carnival

March 06, 2015

Even though Bahamas National Festival Commission Chairman Paul Major has suggested Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival would not be economically viable without an international headliner, Culture Minister Dr. Daniel Johnson contended yesterday that carnival would be just as "fantastic" with only Bahamian performers...

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Tickets for Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival events go on sale online

March 06, 2015

Tickets for Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival events are officially on sale online, with the Bahamas National Festival Commission confirming successful initial purchases and a smooth transaction process...

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BNFC breaks ground on Da Cultural Village

March 06, 2015

Ground was broken on "Da Cultural Village" this week at the Western Esplanade as the Bahamas National Festival Commission steadily increases preparations for the Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival in the weeks to come...

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No headliner yet - but carnival tickets now on sale
No headliner yet - but carnival tickets now on sale

March 05, 2015

TICKETS for Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival events are officially on sale online, with the Bahamas National Festival Commission saying they had successful initial purchases and a smooth transaction process...

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Full House at 1st Save The Bays Grand Bahama Fund Raiser
Full House at 1st Save The Bays Grand Bahama Fund Raiser

March 05, 2015

Scores of people from every walk of life packed a concert this weekend hosted by Save The Bays, singing along with performers, dancing and helping to raise funds for the fast-growing environmental movement...

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BNFC Breaks Ground on Da Cultural Village
BNFC Breaks Ground on Da Cultural Village

March 05, 2015

Ground was broken on ‘Da Cultural Village’ this week at the Western Esplanade as the Bahamas National Festival Commission steadily increases preparations for the Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival in the weeks to come...

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