Education

LCIS students bring global issues to the classroom

June 03, 2015

Each year, grade six students at Lyford Cay International School (LCIS) plan and organize a full day of presentations on social and environmental issues. The presentations, called exhibition, are a requirement of the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme (PYP). Countless hours of research, listening, learning, writing and designing are put on full display during 20-minute presentations to parents, teachers, community members, students from LCIS and neighboring schools.
This year LCIS students presented under the transdisciplinary theme "Sharing the Planet - Rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and living things". The exhibition topics for this year were ocean pollution, child health, poverty, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), child abuse, poaching and animal cruelty. The exhibition is demonstrative of what it means to be an International Baccalaureate (IB) student because students apply everything they have learned during their six years in the program. Following specific guidelines, all students participate in group research and make an individual contribution to the presentation.
Beside educating their audiences, groups each choose an action to take to solve an identifiable local problem that is also related to the bigger world. For example, students in the GMO group demonstrated the use of an app which helps consumers identify food with genetically modified components. Students in the child abuse group visited the Children's Emergency Hostel to deliver Easter surprises to the children who live in the home.
Throughout the exhibition process, students rely heavily on their mentors to help guide them through the steps.
"Our teachers at LCIS readily volunteer to act as mentors despite their very heavy workloads," said LCIS principal, Stacey Bobo. In her seventh year as an exhibition mentor, fifth grade teacher Denize Markham worked with the group learning about child abuse.
"It is wonderful to see the students grow in terms of their research, communication and presentation skills," said Markham. "At the beginning, they require a great deal of guidance and support. Yet, by the end, their presentations are of a quality that you would expect from a high school student. It was great to see them handle a sensitive topic in an informative way."
At LCIS, exhibition continues to be a seminal moment for grade six students. It is the culmination of all they have learned in the PYP and acts as a launching pad into the Middle Years Programme (MYP) which students begin in grade seven. Not only do students carry the skills and knowledge gained through the exhibition process into their later years, they have also helped to challenge and educate students of all ages, parents and teachers.

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St. Andrew's School students celebrate milestone with showcase

June 03, 2015

St. Andrew's School Year 6 students hosted an exhibition entitled "Aid Organizations Work to Protect the Rights and Resources of People, Places, and Animals" recently.
Part of the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program curriculum, the annual Year 6 showcase is an important milestone for the children which provides them with an opportunity to engage in detailed, collaborative inquiry and to share and celebrate all they've learnt during their primary school years before moving on to middle school.
The idea for the exhibition emerged after the students were tasked with analyzing the following theme: "Sharing the Planet: An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution."
They spent nine weeks researching, writing, creating posters and online presentations, cooperating and rehearsing.
The showcase began with a stage production in which the children addressed numerous challenges being faced by humans, animals and the environment through drama, poetry and song. They described the work being done by a wide range of non-profit organizations that seek to meet those challenges, and then encouraged their audience -- other students, parents, guardians, family members, faculty and friends of the school -- to go out and make a difference.
After refreshments, the 40 children introduced their individual displays on their chosen subjects. The displays included extensive written reports and presentations on their Chromebook laptops, which were provided to them by the school earlier this year as part of a pilot digital literacy program.
This groundbreaking initiative brings the "Google for Education" suite of apps, books and videos to the classroom. The software, which is free to schools, allows users to create, share and edit files in real time, thus greatly increasing productivity as well as interaction and collaboration between students and teachers.
Each user receives a Gmail account, and projects are automatically saved on the Cloud for safety and easy access at any time from any computer, tablet or phone.
The program was funded by the St. Andrew's School Parent Teacher Association (PTA). Custom Computers Ltd., which supplied the Chromebooks also made a $5,000 donation to assist with its introduction.
The mood at the exhibition was one of pride and enthusiasm, with both parents and students expressing their excitement at all of the possibilities being presented by the digital literacy platform.
"It helped me a lot because I got most of my information off the Internet," said Year 6 student Raven Deveaux. "So it helped me to find my information and I hope it's going to get me a good grade."
Indira Francis said that her daughter, Gabriella Francis, loves learning all about the software and finds it very easy to work with.
"She was very excited to study because she had that laptop there," said Francis. "It was given to the students in the classroom, which means they used it daily to do their research, and it made it easier for them to get information at their fingertips by just pressing a button. It's new for people my age to see your daughter on the computer all the time, so I had to try and understand the benefits of it for her in Year 6. And clearly by way of this exhibition, it is something that is a useful tool for kids her age in order to learn more about the world and the things that are happening in the world."

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National champ finds silver lining to Scripps National Spelling Bee showing

June 03, 2015

National Spelling Bee champion Charles Hamilton Jr., went into the Scripps National Spelling Bee Competition expecting to win, but while disappointed with his performance in not qualifying past the semifinals of the Washington, D.C. competition, he did find a silver lining to the outcome.
"I was a bit discouraged but I remembered that I was going up against people who have been participating five years in a row and have been preparing with the dictionary for five years," said the 12-year-old St. Anne's School student.
"I realized that my two months of preparation would shine in comparison to their five years of hard work," he said upon his return.
At the second round of the competition Charles correctly spelt and defined the words, "umlaut" and "symbiosis" respectively. However, in the third round he spelt the word "wensleydale" correctly but did not correctly define the word "desuetude."
Charles answered that the word "desuetude" means emotionally conflicted. The correct meaning of the word is "apparently abandoned".
His overall scores did not qualify him to move into the semi-finals.
Charles said he had been nervous. And that being on the international stage and competing with people from all over the world was nothing like competing at the national championship.
The son of Charles Sr. and Beverly Hamilton, the senior mistress at St. Anne's Primary School, said that if he had the opportunity to do it all over again he would do seasonal preparation, and begin preparing all year round.
Hamilton was pleased with her son's accomplishment.
"I was extremely proud because Charles worked so hard to get where he was and I was just overjoyed," she said. "It was just a good, good feeling to know he was among 284 of the best (spellers) in the world."
The parents of the 12-year-old often encourage him by telling him there is nothing that he can't do.
His mother described how she tries to inspire him daily.
"Everyday before he gets out of the car we have a little pep talk and I say to him, you are the number one in class, don't let anyone tell you different. You don't need any affirmation. You go in there and always give it 110 percent and that is exactly what he does."
The young speller, who has a speech impediment, initially did not want to compete in The Bahamas National Spelling Bee. His mother said Charles was afraid that people would laugh at him because of his stutter.
However, after encouragement from his mother, Charles went on to compete and win the national title to earn the right to represent the country in Washington.
Hamilton said she told her son that he would never know what he would accomplish if he allowed his impediment to hinder him. She told him that he was an excellent speller and an intelligent child and that if he did not take the opportunity, he would blame himself.
The senior mistress and mother said she believes that her son's speech impediment will help him more than hurt him because it's what gives him an extra push.
She said she knows that it does get to him at times but he can usually put it on the back burner in order to get done, whatever he has to do.
Charles said that although he may sometimes be discouraged with his speech impediment, because he loves to speak and he has always wanted to be a narrator, his impediment has never held him back.
He recalled his fear of stammering on stage during nationals.
"It is a great thing that I didn't let that get the better of me because I wouldn't have experienced what I have," he said.
His attributes his inspiration for success to his parents and his grandmother who he said always encourage him to do what he feels is right, to always follow his instincts, to prepare and to be second to none.
Although he found it hard to narrow down his role models Charles said that he admires Albert Einstein because of the famous scientist's unorthodox approach to his theories, his swift rise to fame from being an outcast and the way his fame has lasted over time.
Despite his hard work in school and preparation for both the Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC) and the spelling competition Charles is still a normal child.
His mother said he is very technical and often tries to make gadgets and fix phones. Charles wants to become a medical researcher.

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Weigh your options

June 03, 2015

There's no doubt about it, we will all encounter times in our lives when we have to weigh our options. That's right, let's consider a few specific examples so that everyone can fully understand the content of today's most important lesson. We all at times in our lives come to a set of crossroads, so to speak where we have to make a decision as to which way we wish to travel on the road of life.
Let's say you work for an organization in a particular field whom you've been associated with for quite a long period of time. You're satisfied to a certain extent, however, you've always had a yearning deep down in your consciousness to eventually own your own business. So now it's that time when you have to make a decision ... do I stay where I am where I'm quite happy and well remunerated? However, I honestly feel that I could do a whole lot better if I were in business for myself as I have been toying with some innovative ways of providing customers with better service and some new exciting products, which I've researched.
So when decision time comes along, you have to weigh your options. This is a most important exercise to go through when you're contemplating major changes in any area of your overall life. The process of weighing your options should in no way be rushed as it is in the end going to determine the future direction of your life. So every option you come up with needs to be thought through in great detail, and then of course when you have explored all of your options, you must make a decision.
Yes indeed, there are times in all of our lives when we have a major decision to make pertaining to some aspect of our life when we most definitely need to weigh our options to determine the direction in which we wish to proceed. Do I stay in my personal relationship as it is, or plan on getting married and having a family? Weigh your options. Should I adhere to the religious teachings I was brought up with, or should I explore other spiritual belief systems? Weigh your options, and when that most important exercise is complete, make the appropriate decision and move on with your life.
Think about it!

o Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Prime Minister addresses UWI Vice-Chancellor at Installation Ceremony

June 01, 2015

Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas the Rt. Hon. Perry Christie addressed installation ceremonies of Professor Sir Hilary Beckles as Vice-Chancellor of the University of the West Indies...

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The College of The Bahamas hosts commencement ceremony: 557 graduates
The College of The Bahamas hosts commencement ceremony: 557 graduates

May 29, 2015

The 2015 Commencement Class of The College of The Bahamas was encouraged to be the vessels for national transformation on Thursday in what was intended to be the final Commencement Ceremony under the banner of The College of The Bahamas before the institution transitions to university status...

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BJC Paper 2 Examination Security Breach
BJC Paper 2 Examination Security Breach

May 29, 2015

Please be advised that the BJC English Language Paper 2 examination was compromised at one of the Examination Centers. This breach makes the present paper void...

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Commissioning Ceremony of Education Graduands at COB
Commissioning Ceremony of Education Graduands at COB

May 27, 2015

The latest graduands from The College of The Bahamas' School of Education were formally welcomed into the community of educators on Tuesday, in a ceremony that has become a staple event on the COB Commencement Calendar...

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Grand Bahama Student Samaiya Lundy Brings Home Top Honours

May 27, 2015

GRAND BAHAMA STUDENT BRINGS HOME TOP HONOURS – The Hon. Dr. Michael Darville, Minister for Grand Bahama, was at Grand Bahama International Airport on Sunday to welcome home Samaiya Lundy, the 2015 Bahamas Primary School Student...

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Samaiya Lundy is nation's top primary school student

May 27, 2015

Samaiya Lundy, 11, a student of Sunland Baptist Academy in Grand Bahama, was awarded the 2015 Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year award on Saturday.
The 19th annual awards ceremony was held by the Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year Foundation in conjunction with the Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council at Golden Gates Assemblies World Outreach Ministries.
Samaiya was the top student nominated from her school, and was selected from among 121 nominees from different schools throughout The Bahamas.
She received a $6,000 scholarship to go towards tuition and fees for her secondary education.
The nominees were judged on their contribution to school life, academic achievement, extracurricular achievement, community involvement and the overall presentation of a portfolio they submitted.
The qualifications for submission included a 500 word essay on the topic: "If you can change The Bahamas, what would you do and why?"; a 200-250 word statement on "Why I should be selected as the 2015 Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year?"; and three letters of recommendation from the students' school principal/vice principal, classroom teacher/civic or community leader, and religious leader/extracurricular coach.
Samaiya is the second child of Mark and Shantell Lundy.
The couple has two other children, a 21-year-old son, and a two-year-old daughter.
In an interview with The Nassau Guardian yesterday Samaiya's mother said, "There really aren't enough words to express just how proud and grateful I am at this accomplishment."
She added, "For our family it's a major accomplishment.
"We celebrate it and I feel more excited for Samaiya and what it means for her, what it does for her as a child and what an amazing once in a lifetime experience she has been fortunate enough to have had happened to her.
"I am happy and I'm a million times happy for her."
Samaiya's mother said that as parents they have always tried to give her the richest, most memorable childhood that any child can have.
"Everything that Samaiya does, we support her in the littlest thing to the biggest thing.
"We celebrate the smallest thing because we want to create memories for her," said Shantell.
"We try to provide her with the best education and we encourage her in activities.
"Everything she does, she does it purely out of a love and passion for it.
"She has a choice, most of the time, in what she wants to do and it's organic, it's what she loves.
"And whatever she loves we try to guide her and we just absolutely support her."
Samaiya maintains a 3.90 accumulative grade point average.
"I really study hard and I try to do the best I can," Samaiya said.
"I love school and I want to get a good education and go off to college to be a better person."
She said her favorite subject in school is science because it's a mixture of different things and they all connect with each other.
Samaiya's mother said she is an average child that likes to do so many different things and as parents they allow her to be that child.
However, unlike other children her age, Samaiya is not computer savvy and has just recently been gifted with her first computer.
When asked what she wants to be when she gets older, Samaiya said it's hard for her to choose because she is very talented and there are so many different things that she wants to do.
Her ultimate goal is to become a veterinarian.
Samaiya said she loves singing, playing piano, working at the veterinarian hospital, running track, playing soccer, riding her bike, climbing trees and so much more.
She is active in Junior Junkanoo and is a member of her school's junior track and field team, junior girl's softball team, school choir, Grand Bahama Youth Choir, and children's ministry, children's choir and jubilation station at St. John's Jubilee Cathedral.
She was also a former brownie, house captain, and head prefect.
The active 11-year-old said that she would advise every student to work hard, be involved, stay focused, be organized and just love everything that they do.
When asked who are her role models Samaiya quickly and proudly said her parents.
She added, "They love me and support me.
"They know the right things to say, the right things to do and they teach me right from wrong."
Samaiya's mother explained that they have a great support system made up of their family and friends, Samaiya's school, their church, and their community.
"We don't take full credit," she added.
"We know and recognize that it does take a village to raise a child."

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Commissioning ceremony held for Education graduates of COB

May 27, 2015

The latest graduates from The College of The Bahamas' School of Education were formally welcomed into the community of educators on Tuesday, in a ceremony that has become a staple event on the COB commencement calendar.
Approximately 100 graduating students participated in the annual teachers' commissioning ceremony held at the college's Performing Arts Centre.
Guest speaker at the ceremony, former Senator Dr. Jacintha Higgs, principal of Akhepran International Academy, implored the graduates to evaluate their motives, goals and ability to effectively guide children towards their destinies.
"What is your end goal? How are you going to transform the nation and impact the world? Your end goal should always be about changing the course for others to lead a better life,
a better life history, to fulfill your life's purpose to which you were born and to which they were born and for you to be a beacon to advance and to elevate humanity," she said in an impassioned address.
In giving the graduands much food for thought, Dr. Higgs urged balance in their approach to education and leadership.
"Are your motives pure? Teaching is a very powerful position because you have the domain of your own classroom. Be very careful; don't let it cause you to waiver in your divine selfhood. Balance your heart with your brain. The children need both," she said.
"If any of you have any unresolved issues do not go and stand before the children because that young Bahamian guy is waiting on you to help him... the little girl is waiting on you so if you are going in there carrying in your two-pound heart some grudges, you won't have space in your heart to embrace them." Dr. Higgs added.
In his remarks, COB President Dr. Rodney D. Smith reminded the graduating students that their influence as teachers will extend far beyond the classroom.
"In your care and under your influence will be children and young adults from many different backgrounds. They will require your expertise, not only to educate them, but to help shape them into engaged members of our society," Dr. Smith said.
"My advice to you as new teachers is to be kind. A little kindness will go a long way in helping you to create the right atmosphere in your classroom and develop healthy relationships with your students," he added.
The teachers' commissioning ceremony was the fifth of its kind held by the college to commission those entering the teaching profession. In addition to pledging to promote equity in education, facilitate active learning and uphold integrity, honesty and professionalism, the graduands were also symbolically pinned as part of the rite of passage.
Graduand Franchesca Sears looks forward to assuming her role as a religious studies teacher.
"I had my junior high and high school religion teachers who inspired me and I feel that going forward, especially in the high schools, students need to be grounded spiritually as they go into the real world," she said. "My time at COB has been an awesome experience and I intend to pursue my master's degree in a major to be determined."
Spanish education major Anthony Young was overcome by a sense of accomplishment.
"I felt like I was accomplishing something finally. Today seemed so far away.
"The School of Education was really tough on us in terms of being on time and getting our work in. The whole education system is overwhelming at times but it keeps you on top of things. It prepares you," he said.
The ceremony is the first of five marking the commencement season for the college. The others, including the formal commencement ceremony, are being held throughout this week.
The college's 2015 commencement class comprises more than 550 persons, the majority of whom are earning baccalaureate degrees.

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Cloudy days pass

May 27, 2015

Joel Osteen told of a rather long period some years ago, when the weather was completely overcast for days. Finally, one morning as he was feeling a bit down in his office looking out of the window at the bleak, dark and dismal scene; the clouds started to disperse and the sun finally lit up the sky. As this happened, Joel said that a feeling of wellbeing overcame him as the sun shone brightly everywhere, especially in his previously cloudy mind. Surely this is an excellent analogy for the way life works at times for all of us?....Yes It Is!
There's no doubt about it, we all go through periods in our lives when our minds are bathed in darkness as clouds of doubt and disbelief roll across our minds and lives. However, we need to always keep in mind The FACT, that on cloudy days, even though we can't actually see it, the sun is still shining; however, its rays are temporarily blocked by the clouds.
So My Friend, whenever you start to get a little bit down and perhaps despondent, maybe ever quite depressed and a little bit desperate as all appears to be quite dark in your life and affairs; take heart for as today's title puts it 'Cloudy Days Pass'.....Yes They Do! Likewise, the clouds of doubt presently permeating your thinking will indeed give way very soon to The Sunshine of Success.
But D. Paul it's easy for you to tell me that 'Cloudy Days Pass' and that the difficulties I'm presently experiencing will pass with time. But how do you cope with the difficult times in your life? Good question and here's the answer. #1. By just being aware of what I have stated here today thus realizing that better times are already on their way, and #2. By staying in touch with your 'Source of Strength', The Creator, God through daily prayer and meditation. Yes indeed, believe me, God has got your back, figuratively speaking. So put your complete trust in HIM during the difficult, cloudy times, and He will lead you back into The Sunshine of Success, believe me.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Twenty-four Schools to Compete in the 37th Track and Field Primary School Championship Meet
Twenty-four Schools to Compete in the 37th Track and Field Primary School Championship Meet

May 27, 2015

The New Providence Public Primary Schools Sports Association (NPPPSSA) will host its 37th Annual Track and Field Championship meet for public primary schools from Wednesday, May 27th to Friday, May 29th at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium...

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Soccer Players Nominated for Student of the Year Awards

May 26, 2015

Congratulations to three(3)young primary school student of the year nominees...

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Students graduate from YEA environmental program

May 22, 2015

Friends and family members filled the halls of Wallace Groves Auditorium of Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Primary School to cheer on just under 30 students as they walked across the stage as certified leaders and environmentalists graduating from the Youth Environment Ambassador (YEA) program, spearheaded by fast-growing environmental group, Save The Bays (STB)...

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The Grand Bahama Technical Cadet Corps The Grand Bahama Technical Cadet Corps Programme Celebrates its 20th Anniversary with 30 Graduates

May 21, 2015

The Grand Bahama Technical Cadet Corps Programme (TCCP) celebrated 30 cadets during a graduation ceremony held at the Grand Lucayan Ballroom in Freeport, Grand Bahama. This year also marked the 20thanniversary of the Grand Bahama TCCP...

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Students Graduate from Environmental Program
Students Graduate from Environmental Program

May 20, 2015

Friends and family members filled the halls of Wallace Groves Auditorium of Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Primary School to cheer on just under 30 students...

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Bahamian student to take on National Spelling Bee in Washington

May 20, 2015

CHARLES Hamilton will be among 285 hopefuls when he represents The Bahamas in the prestigious Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, DC, next week...

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Anatol Rodgers celebrates tremendous successes

May 20, 2015

Recent successes from Anatol Rodgers High School students have proven that the Mighty Timberwolves are front-runners in producing quality performance...

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