Education

QC student proves to be the best and brightest

April 16, 2014

Queen's College student, Blair Evans, was dubbed the best and brightest graduating senior female in The Bahamas by the Eta Psi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., after she captured the Most Outstanding Honoree award at the sorority's recent 36th annual Honours Day. Held at Government House, this year's Honours Day Programme was themed "Developing Global Leaders to Flourish in A Modern Bahamas".
Following the three-day event, which involved a general knowledge test, essay competition and leadership interview, Evans took home the top honor and a $5,000 scholarship tenable at the school of her choice. She had the highest overall combined score in all three areas of testing.
Evans' outstanding math results were tied with those of Gabrielle Moss, a student of Bishop Michael Eldon School in Grand Bahama. The girls shared the $400 cash prize associated with winning the Math and Science award.
Moss also laid claim to the Most Outstanding Family Island Student award, for which she received a $2,500 scholarship.
St. John's College Head Girl Camille Minns received the Leadership award, for which she received $250. The English award for the best penned essay went to Symone Hall of St. Augustine's College, who took home a new laptop. The Community Support award was given to C.R. Walker student, Beautisca King. Her family and friends had purchased the most advertisements in the honoree booklet.
While six awards and five cash scholarships were distributed during the recent ceremony, all of the 19 honorees who participated in the program were deemed winners in their own right for having been accepted into the Honours Day Programme, and, as a result, each received a medal presented by Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes.
During her address, Dr. Adair Johnson White, author and AKA sorority member told the girls that it did not matter where they had come from and, if they are willing to get up and get over it, there is nothing they can not do.
Eta Psi Omega Chapter and AKA Sorority Inc. are examples of the impossible being achieved. Eta Psi Omega was the second chapter founded outside of America by four women in 1963, when forming chapters of that size had never been done. Similarly, AKA Sorority Inc. broke barriers when it was formed in 1908 as the first sorority for women of color.
Eta Psi Omega President Alana Ingraham told the students that women could be the first and the finest, adding that wherever their paths take them, they should continue to flourish.
"Women are equally capable, equally talented and equally worthy to lead, and, in a modern Bahamas, we need you more than ever," said Ingraham.
Honours Day Committee Co-chairs Neutalya McDonald and D'Asante Beneby focused on this year's leadership aspect, helping the students to identify and foster the leaders within themselves, so that they could use their academic achievements to be leaders in other areas.
AKA sorority members live by the motto, "service to all mankind". One of the leadership highlights for the weekend allowed honorees to participate in a community service beach cleanup and tour at the Bahamas Clifton Heritage National Park.
Leading up to the Honours Day ceremony, Ingraham, McDonald and Beneby met with Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald told the attendees that it was essential that organizations like AKA exist to inspire young ladies and future leaders in The Bahamas. He told them he was delighted that the organization continued to financially assist qualified females in pursuit of a college education and said he urged high schools and high school staff, specifically guidance counselors, to ensure that qualified students apply for the various scholarships available through programs like Honours Day. The scholarship and activities are funded solely through donations and chapter fundraisers. To support or to request more information on the AKA Honours Day Program, email etapsiomega.honoursday@gmail.com.

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The storm before the calm

April 16, 2014

Anyone who has experienced a bad storm, like a hurricane for example knows, that although the storm can be quite terrifying as it reaches its peak, as the winds howl and rage uprooting trees, tearing roofs off buildings and generally causing havoc; once the storm has passed the calm always returns. When calm returns, it's difficult to imagine, that just a short while ago havoc was evident everywhere as calmness and sunny, bright skies are visible everywhere. My friend, surely that is a very good analogy for certain periods which we all inevitably experience in our lives from time to time.
That's right, we all go through stormy periods in both our personal and professional lives when the winds of change are blowing real hard thus causing havoc, even destruction in many areas. However, the real point which I want to get over to everyone here today is this. No matter how bad things may appear to be in your life right now, no matter how fierce the storms which are raging appear to be, nothing is more certain than the fact, that eventually the calm will indeed return as a degree of normalcy comes back into your life and affairs. This my friend, is guaranteed. Yes it is!
But D. Paul, how do you know this for sure, many who are going through very difficult stormy times may understandably query? Because my friend, that's the way the universe operates and nothing ever lasts forever. So, if you're going through a storm right now, take heart for this is just the storm before the calm. Yes it is for better times, calmer times are already on their way. I guarantee it!
As I have relayed to you my valued readers in the past, the universe and everything in it, including your life, operates in cycles. So there's the up cycles and the down cycles, the highs and the lows, the storms and the calmer times, this is the way the universe always has, does and will continue to operate, in cycles.
So my friend, in conclusion, although you may right now be in a stormy cycle with the winds of change raging everywhere, I want you to take heart for calmer times are already on their way. It's inevitable, it's the way life works. So, get positive again as you put your sunny, smiling face on, figuratively speaking, as you prepare once again for the sunshine of success which will shine brightly on your life and affairs.
o Think about it!

Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com. Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Scotiabank salutes Outstanding Primary School Students

April 15, 2014

Scotiabank recently demonstrated its continued commitment to the development of Bahamian youth by, once again, becoming a patron sponsor of The Bahamas Primary School Student of the Year Foundation...

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Baha Mar Lauches Casino Dealer Training Program
Baha Mar Lauches Casino Dealer Training Program

April 15, 2014

Free Program To Teach Skills Needed For Largest Casino In The Caribbean...

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Summer camp partnership to highlight the environment
Summer camp partnership to highlight the environment

April 14, 2014

Save The Bays teams up with local library to inspire the next generation of conservationists...

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8 Year-old Bahamian Among Seven National Dream Kids Scholarship Winners in USA

April 14, 2014

Bravo's Real Housewives of Atlanta star Cynthia Bailey and daughter Noelle Robinson along with V-103's Syntonnia hosted the "Kids Dreaming Big" Meet and Greet celebrating the first annual "Kids Dreaming Big" Scholarship recently...

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CB teams up with JA for Money Management Seminar

April 12, 2014

The financial consciousness of over 260 students between grades 7-9 was awakened at the Commonwealth Bank (CB) and Junior Achievement (JA) New Providence hosted the 'Let's Talk about the Future Career & Financial Planning Seminar' held recently...

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Toastmasters Club 1600 celebrates 45 years
Toastmasters Club 1600 celebrates 45 years

April 11, 2014

Celebration and reflection marked the 45th anniversary of Club 1600, the first branch of Toastmasters to be established in The Bahamas...

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Book fair puts a smile on children's faces

April 10, 2014

PRE-SCHOOL week continued yesterday as 1,200 toddlers from around New Providence assembled at the Willard Patton Pre-School for a book and literacy fair...

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Sunland Baptist Academy student pens top essay

April 09, 2014

Sunland Baptist Academy's Saida Karamo says the fight for women's equality is not over, and there is a lot more that needs to be done by men in supporting women's rights and equality. Karamo says once men stop buying into the idea that women are only sex symbols or baby incubators and start giving women true value, that women will feel and become more empowered.
Karamo's views were put forward in her essay, which came out on top in the "Join Me on the Bridge" art competition. Held in Grand Bahama, the annual contest gives female students in grades nine to 13 the chance to use their artistic and writing talents to celebrate International Women's Day.
"Before women had the right to vote, or own property, the right to compete in the workforce, or the right to make decisions regarding their sexual health, men had to support the idea of empowering women by affording them equal rights," said Karamo in her essay. "Although we have much further to go, especially in non-Westernized societies, men play a pivotal role in supporting women's rights and equality. In countries where a woman's worth is less than that of a domesticated animal, it is unfathomable to imagine that women could be subjected to such a low status in any society."
Karamo got the opportunity to read her essay during the opening ceremony, held at the Garden of the Groves.
Bishop Michael Eldon School's Candice Woon received honorable mention for her essay contribution in which she said that people have the potential to open their eyes and see past the old and sometimes narrow views of their ancestors.
"Men may aid in helping women achieve their rights by using their authority to promote change as well as by promoting equality in the workplace by supporting equal salaries," she said. "The children of today are to be the workforce of tomorrow, and by teaching them against gender discrimination then we are freeing them from the traditions that have bound us. With the support of our male counterparts we may join together to reach our goals. And may go forward, upward, onward, together."
St. George's High School's Thaddia Simms walked away as winner of the art competition, with Grea Prescod from Grand Bahama Catholic High School receiving honorable mention. Their works were displayed during the event.
International Women's Day is a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women, past, present and future. "Join Me on the Bridge" in Grand Bahama is now in its fifth year.
"Join Me on the Bridge" organizer, Lynette McInnes said, in an effort to encourage young men to explore and reflect on women's rights and equality and be more involved in women's issues, that an essay and art competition for young men will be added.
Saida Karamo's winning essay
Before women had the right to vote, or own property, the right to compete in the workforce, or the right to make decisions regarding their sexual health, men had to support the idea of empowering women by affording them "equal" rights. Although we have much further to go especially in non-Westernized societies, men play a pivotal role in supporting women's rights and equality. In countries where a woman's worth is less than that of a domesticated animal, it is unfathomable to imagine that women could be subjected to such a low status in any society. However, men can be agents of change by creating laws to support and enforce the fair treatment of women, changing societal views on women by promoting women in a positive light and speaking out against cultural norms and religions that support the unfair treatment of women.
A man can support women's rights by creating laws to protect women and to penalize those who ill-treat, abuse and deny women fair treatment. These laws would ensure that women have access to quality education and equal rights in terms of custody of children, property and advancing their career. More education and freedom would mean that women could have access to better jobs and have a more vocal and dominant role in society.
A man can help change negative views on women by creating laws to protect them, portraying women in a positive light in society. Once men stop buying into the idea that women are only sex symbols or baby incubators and start giving women true value women will feel and become more empowered. If men take and treat women more serious and as equals than other men will eventually have to change their negative perceptions and treat women as they should be treated. Women can do a lot alone but with the support of men, a lot more can be achieved and accomplished.
If women are placed in a more positive light, a lot of negativity around the status of women would be removed and eventually eradicated. In many cases, women are demoted to silent figures in the households who take care of the animals, and the children and provide sons for their husbands but if women are more revered in society then they would be placed on a pedestal and achieve a higher status. A lot of this can be changed if men are engaged in discussions about cultural norms that have been passed down where it is considered okay to treat women unfairly. Also, if pastors and religious leaders enforce messages that treating women unfairly, and denying them rights is wrong, then women can achieve equality.
The fight for women's equality is not over and there is a lot more that is needed to do be done. If men respect women and fight for them and protect them, they would be great supporters in ending discrimination and inequality among women.
Candice Woon's honorable mention essay
Throughout history there has always been tension/conflict between sexes as a result of our competitive instinct to be superior being reflected on our physical differences; for what makes men and women so different than just contrasting physical features. However, in our competitive blindness we have stripped ourselves of our own rights, rights that should be shared equally. For example in China the one child law which states that each family may only have one child has led to the murder of several female infants but who's to say that said child could not achieve greatness just as any boy or girl throughout the world may? Now that we can see that we are equal, with the exception of a few physical features, we should strive to change the old rules and traditions put in place by our narrow-sighted ancestors. Thus, I believe that men's role in supporting women's rights is through using their authority to influence change, through their actions and education of the youth.
It can be observed in our daily lives that there are more men in positions of high authority than women. This may have been a result of traditions that continue to affect us today; for example male priests, male popes, male prime ministers, or even male governor-generals. But change is coming. And we must face a simple truth... that we need male support to gain our own rights. It is only logical to appeal to those with authority to change that which holds us down which in some cases is the law. Thus, those men in power hold a responsibility towards us, especially women, to support equality.
Men may also support equal rights through equal pay. As Obama, president of the United States of America, stated in his State of the Union Address women are earning less money than men: "77 cents to a dollar" respectively. By allowing this unfair treatment to continue we are holding ourselves back from seeing past physical differences and prevent ourselves from maturing.
Finally as we all know one of the most efficient ways to create change in society is through the education of the youth. Children are not discriminatory. We must learn to judge others before we begin to discriminate. Thus, fathers may help by not teaching their children to discriminate. For example as Norman Podhoretz stated, in his article "My Negro Problem-And Ours," "I know from observing my own children that they attribute no significance to such differences even when they begin noticing them"; in this quote he is described how children are not born with predetermined judgment so why should we take upon ourselves to change a natural idea that should never have been tampered with in the first place?
We have the potential to open our eyes and see past the old and sometimes narrow views of our ancestors. Men may aid in helping women achieve their rights by using their authority to promote change as well as by promoting equality in the workplace by supporting equal salaries. The children of today are to be the workforce of tomorrow and by teaching them against gender discrimination then we are freeing them from the traditions that have bound us. With the support of our male counterparts we may join together to reach our goals. And may go Forward, Upward, Onward, Together.

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BTVI fashion design students told the world is their market

April 09, 2014

With the technological world of today, fashion design students were told that they do not have to be boxed in and the world is their market. That bit of advice came from president of the Montaque Group and Creator of Islands of the World Fashion Week, Owen Bethel, a panelist at a recent Fashion Forum held at The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI), where he emphasized to the students the importance of thinking globally.
"Don't limit yourselves to The Bahamas. Your competition is also the world. Draw a bridge between what you're learning and where you want to go," said Bethel.
Noting there will be disappointments and rejections along the way, Bethel who is also a member of BTVI's Program Advisory Committee (PAC) added that disappointments and rejections should be viewed as lessons.
Bethel told the aspiring fashion designers the significance of utilizing social media as a marketing tool.
"In this modern day, you have the means to get your product out there. It's the greatest marketing tool to have. You can't be intimidated by it. You have to use it."
The forum's other panelists included fashion designer and former BTVI student, Kevin Evans, along with Executive Director of Junior Achievement, Philip Simon. Under the theme, "Passion for Fashion," they discussed several topics such as pricing, networking and marketing.
Simon told students that market research is important, and emphasized fundamental aspects of business including honesty, reliability and punctuality.
Evans, who owns the Kevin Evans Collection, was one of the top three fashion designers at the Miami RAWards semi-final competition in November 2013. He believes more students can emerge from BTVI's fashion program and experience the success he has.
"They must overcome their fears. I want them to build their confidence. They must break that barrier, even if they start with family members and then friends. They must believe in their work," said the fashion designer who sewed his first garment for his grandfather.
Student Krystle Murphy said she was inspired by the work Evans brought with him to the forum. "I can take my dream further. The information helped to encourage me and will help me to stay driven," she said.
Lanova Lotmore said the exposure caused her to re-think her position about participating in fashion shows. "I didn't want to be in fashion shows, but the forum has pushed me to do so," said the student.
Lotmore went on to credit BTVI's fashion department headed by Shirley Pearson for her quest for perfection. "I am very detail-oriented and I was taught that at BTVI. The inside needs to be just as good as the outside," said the student who first sewed a glasses case for her mom at the age of four.
Taking a refresher course in fashion design at BTVI, Ann Bease, a custom bra maker also said how impressed she was with Evans' work, but also about the business tips the panelists shared.
"Students already have the fashion side, but if you don't have a business sense, you're doomed to fail," said Bease. "It was more than I expected and it related to our program. It was very informative, especially the business side of it."

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McDonald's donates 200 children's books

April 09, 2014

Hundreds of local students are discovering something new and special on their school shelves, thanks to fast food giant, McDonald's. While that something has little to do with Big Macs and Happy Meals, it has a whole lot to do with happiness, in itself.
The new treat is a book entitled "Sammy the Snail", the tale of a troubled snail who holds all his fears, uncertainties and worries inside, until he discovers the wisdom and relief of sharing. Thanks to a partnership made between McDonald's, local schools and Bahamian author, Allie MacPhail, the oversized, brightly illustrated children's book is becoming a popular addition in schools and after school programs.
In addition to academic libraries, McDonald's has extended the McLovin to a lucky 200 primary youngsters, who got a side of "Sammy the Snail" books at a reading of his inspiring adventure, hosted by a local McDonald's restaurant. The reading and book donations were part of a "meet the author" series that began in mid-February; the book was so popular, it was extended to schools that month.
MacPhail is a family and marriage-counseling specialist with nearly 20 years experience; working in collaboration with talented illustrator, Allie Rutland, the two sought to ignite a spark in Bahamian children, through the readings. The first 90 copies were carefully paged through by Sandilands Primary students, enhanced by Rutland's animated acting, with the illustrator's experience in studio films lending itself well to the event. Taking the readings next to KPACE, the after school program at Ridgeland Primary led by Darcy Moss, the like-named duo donated an additional 40 books to eager learners.
The book was born out of MacPhail's desire to teach children the importance of expressing, rather than repressing, emotions. The story she wrote captured the heart of McDonald's president, Earla Bethel. "We were so taken by the moral of the story and its beautiful illustrations that we wanted to create an opportunity to make the book widely available," said Bethel.
The author has expressed her gratitude to McDonald's for making the book available.
"We are thrilled to be getting the message of "Sammy the Snail" into the hands of Bahamian children and their families. He inspires us to move freely, and it is wonderful to help kids grow up with the courage to better face difficult emotions," said MacPhail.
Capping off the author's tour are visits to the Ranfurly Home and Red Cross "Marina Glinton Community Centre," which houses programs for Bain and Grants Town children. For event bookings and additional information, contact turtlebackpublishing@live.com. "Sammy the Snail" is available at Logos, The Linen Shop, Doongalik Studio, Bahama Sol, Bahama Republic and various locations around Nassau.

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St. Thomas More Primary School choir captures Atlantis title
St. Thomas More Primary School choir captures Atlantis title

April 09, 2014

St. Thomas More Primary School's choir stole the show with their rendition of "The Myth of Atlantis" to capture the 2nd annual Books Bringing The Beats song competition for primary and junior school choirs...

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An educator who enjoys the profession
An educator who enjoys the profession

April 09, 2014

Troy Oliver has been an educator for over 30 years, and she's never imagined doing anything else...

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Lyford Cay Intl. School set to launch STEM Initiative
Lyford Cay Intl. School set to launch STEM Initiative

April 09, 2014

When grade six Bahamian students are discussing how to get mobile devices into the hands of school age children across The Bahamas, the impact of a school with a strong information and communications technology (ICT) curriculum becomes apparent...

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Educational Institute honors Anatol Rodgers teacher

April 09, 2014

Janelle Cambridge-Johnson, an instructor of high school hospitality classes at Anatol Rodgers High School was the 2014 recipient of the Lamp of Knowledge Award for Outstanding High School Teacher, presented by the American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute (EI). Cambridge-Johnson received the award during the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AH&LA) Legislative Action Summit in Washington, D.C., during the Stars of the Industry Awards Luncheon on Tuesday, April 1.
Cambridge-Johnson was nominated by her principal, Myrtle McPhee, who described her as "outstandingly passionate" about teaching and hospitality.
Cambridge-Johnson works closely with the Bahamas Hotel Association and local hotels to arrange internships and partnership opportunities. She has brought high-performing teams to EI's International Hospitality and Tourism Management Program (HTMP) Competition. She served as advisor to the Junior Hotelier Program, and has extended her teaching duties to the BahamaHost program through the Ministry of Tourism, in addition to preparing students for programs with the Caribbean Hotel Association and the Tourism Safety and Security Network. Her students have won numerous awards and scholarships under her guidance and encouragement. Cambridge-Johnson is the first high school teacher outside the United States to win the Lamp of Knowledge Award.

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Don't write yourself off

April 09, 2014

There is something which happens to a whole lot of people who are getting on in years which is indeed extremely sad to observe, and it's this. Many people who perhaps did not appear to achieve too much with their life in their early and middle years, start to get into a very negative, almost hopeless frame of mind as they approach their senior years, saying to themselves and others, my life is over, I'll never be able to achieve anything worthwhile with my life any more. To anyone who is perhaps in this frame of mind, whether young, middle aged, or in your senior years, I issue you the command contained in the title of today's article, don't write yourself off.
I don't care how big a failure you may have been in the past, or how old you may be, you can indeed still achieve some outstanding things with your life. All it really takes is the belief that you are a divinely created son or daughter of God, filled full of talents which will enable you to do great things with your life, regardless of your age or any other so-called difficulties you may perceive within yourself.
It is a fact, that so many people have achieved some of their greatest accomplishments in the latter part of their life, people like Dr. Maxwell Maltz who was in his late 60s when he began writing and had his best-selling book "Psycho-Cybernetics" published which sold in excess of 15 million copies, and became the definitive book on self-image psychology. Betty White is still doing fabulous work on stage and TV and she's in her 80s. I myself have never been busier in my whole life and am getting my radio series accepted for airing on new stations around the world week after week.
Of course, today's message is not just for those who are getting on in years. There are, I know, a whole lot of people who perhaps failed miserably at something, perhaps a business or a marriage failed ... so what! Today's a brand new day and yesterday is quite definitely over, so why should anyone allow the failures of the past to affect their present progress in any phase of their life. It just doesn't make any sense at all. No it doesn't!
So my friend, if you failed miserably in the past or if you're in your senior years, please I implore you, don't write yourself off for your spiritual father has some great things in store for you. So get up, get dressed, and simply get back in the race, as God quite definitely ordained you to be a winner. Yes he did.
o Think about it!

Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com. Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Comets shine

April 09, 2014

The students and staff at Queen's College (QC) surpassed all expectations with the staging of their most recent production "Guys and Dolls", a musical following a series of "Runyonland" characters, inviting the audience to witness the twists and turns of their lives.
Patrons joined the cast just as Nathan Detroit (played by Hubert Gibson) appeared to be losing his grip on the "oldest established permanent floating craps game" in New York. In order to save himself and his reputation, Detroit made a bet with Sky Masterson (Tristen Ginter), wagering Masterson's success in wooing a local Salvation Army girl, Sarah Brown (Natalie Lester), and convincing her to accompany him on a date to Havana. Detroit's interest in Masterson's love pursuits did few favors for his own, and the audience watched as his 14-year engagement to Cabaret singer, Miss Adelaide (Lauren Thompson) took a hit due to his futile attempts at keeping her demands for marriage at bay. At the toss of a die, both characters, and those beyond the fourth wall jumped on a roller coaster of love, friendship and morality.
The Comets shone in their most recent production, with the dolls delivering scene-stealing performances. Lauren Thompson gave a phenomenal performance as the south Bronx Hot Box star, Miss Adelaide. In stark contrast, Natalie Lester gave playing Sarah Brown, the straight-laced missionary, her best shot; her efforts were not in vain, the actress had the entire audience in stitches over her rendition of a drunk Sarah Brown cavorting in Havana. Her let-loose dance was the proof everyone needed that one should never judge a book by its cover.
Credit also should be given to Ginter and Gibson, who played the perfect partners in comedy. The wonderful antics of Nicely-Nicely Johnson (Karrington McKenzie) and Benny Southstreet (Joel Sweeting) rounded off the comic experience with McKenzie's version of "Sit Down, You're Rockin' the Boat."
"Guys and Dolls" director, Gregory Deane, successfully brought New York's wonderfully electric atmosphere and Havana's exotic allure to the QC stage, with help from talented set designer, Peter Angole, and music composers Karel Coleby and Benjamin Davis.

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Attorney: unregulated development is a social justice issue
Attorney: unregulated development is a social justice issue

April 02, 2014

Ferreira calls on students to join the fight to preserve the Bahamas for their own grandchildren. The fight to protect the environment from the scourge of unregulated development is ultimately a struggle to defend the rights of each and every Bahamian, a top environmental attorney told C.V. Bethel students...

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Looking for the best and brightest
Looking for the best and brightest

April 02, 2014

The best and brightest graduating high school female students from throughout the country will convene in New Providence this week for the 36th Annual Eta Psi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated's Honour's Day Program, with one young lady walking away with the title of Most Outstanding High School Female Student in The Bahamas...

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