Education

Senior Officers Leadership Seminar, under the theme, "Effective Leadership"

March 24, 2015

The Royal Bahamas Police Force under the leadership of Emrick Seymour, Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police for Grand Bahama and the Northern Bahamas District held a seminar for Senior Officers, under the theme, “Effective Leadership,” March 20, at the Gerald Bartlett Police Headquarters...

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Oakes Field Primary School Renamed

March 24, 2015

In a bid to formally recognize Bahamians who dedicated their lives to education, post Independence, the government has continued with a school renaming exercise, which commenced a few years ago...

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Educators Receive Advanced Placement AP Training
Educators Receive Advanced Placement (AP) Training

March 24, 2015

The Ministry of Education, in conjunction with The College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Program hosted some 40 educators and administrators from public and private schools throughout The Bahamas to an AP workshop for guidance counsellors today at Aquinas College...

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Students and faculty members from Iowa State University

March 24, 2015

Students and faculty members from Iowa State University paid a courtesy call...

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Hundreds of Students Flock to hear from Terrorist Survivor

March 24, 2015

More than 430 students from schools across the island recently got a lesson in learning to forgive from a man who spent more than half his life learning it himself following the brutal terrorist attack that left most of his teammates...

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Bahamas National Spelling Bee competitors pay courtesy call on minister of education

March 20, 2015

The competitors of the 18th Annual Bahamas National Spelling Bee Final Competition paid a courtesy call on Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome K. Fitzgerald and Director of Education Lionel Sands at the Ministry of Education Conference Centre yesterday...

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Bahamas National Spelling Bee Competitors pay courtesy call on Minister of Education

March 19, 2015

“The Bees are Coming!”

The competitors of the 18th Annual Bahamas National Spelling Bee Final Competition paid a courtesy call on the Minister of Education, Science and Technology, The Honorable Jerome K. Fitzgerald and the Director of Education, Mr. Lionel Sands today, at the Ministry of Education Conference Centre...

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Bahamian Innovator's Next Phenom product advances to finals in international competition

March 19, 2015

(Panama City, Panama) A young entrepreneur from The Bahamas was selected from over 2,730 international entrants as one the 32 finalists in this year’s Talent and Innovation Competition of the Americas. Marques Williams, who conceptualized Next Phenom, an online stage for amateur athletes will be headed to Panama City, Panama April 7 – 9, 2015 to present his product in the Economic Innovation category of the competition...

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"Chess not Checkers" Young Women Told at S.T.R.A.W Conference

March 19, 2015

Assistant Director of Education in the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Pauline Adderley encouraged the young women to approach their lives with the seriousness of the chess player, rather than with the lesser focus required for the game of checkers...

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Albury Sayle Primary Students Receive Water Safety Tips

March 19, 2015

Over 500 students of Albury Sayle Primary School are the beneficiaries of pencils, water safety coloring and activity books, and posters compliments of Andy and Nancy Knowles of Let’s Swim Bahamas...

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Minister of Education, Science and Technology, the Hon. Jerome Fritzgerald Officially Opens Preschool Units at Primary Schools in North and South Abaco
Minister of Education, Science and Technology, the Hon. Jerome Fritzgerald Officially Opens Preschool Units at Primary Schools in North and South Abaco

March 19, 2015

On Thursday, 12th March 2015, the Minister and a team of Education Officials visited the James A. Pinder Primary School in Sandy Point to officially commission the Preschool unit...

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PM Urges Young People to Plant Trees to Preserve the Environment

March 19, 2015

According to research conducted by the United Nations, deforestation is progressing at a rate of 13 million hectares (or 32 million acres) of forest being destroyed annually...

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Kindergarten 4 and 5 students of Funshine Academy Pre-School

March 19, 2015

Kindergarten 4 and 5 students of Funshine Academy Pre-School paid a courtesy call...

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T.G. Glover is first public school team to win Bahamas Lego Challenge

March 18, 2015

In its second appearance at The Bahamas Lego Challenge (BLC), T.G. Glover is the first public school to capture the Champion's Award in the three-year history of the program. They also took home the Project Award for their website as well as the Robot Performance Award.
Perez Major, Pauline Sweeting, Ishmael Pratt, Welneisha Armbrister and Jasmine Roker comprised the T.G. Glover squad which was coached by Avinel Rutherford and Kristy Bullard.
H.O. Nash School took home the Technical Award; the Core Values Award was given to Abaco Central Primary; the Team Spirit Award went to C.H. Reeves.
It was a win T.G. Glover coach Avinel Rutherford said made her feel good.
"This is our second year in the competition. Last year we did not do well, but the children were enthused and energetic about it, and we actually used what we learned last year and built on that this year. And this was the year for to shine, because the children worked so hard. They gave up their Saturdays, worked mid-term breaks, on the weekends, and were at school until 5-6 p.m. most days, so it made me feel good that they realized that if they worked hard at something they could achieve excellence," she said.
The theme for this year's competition was "Body Forward". The team comprised of fifth and

sixth grade students had to conduct research on body parts, and select one part of the body to research. The TG. Glover students chose the skin and a problem that affects the skin -- ringworm, something they know about and that a lot of children in school get.
T.G. Glover's team members who are a part of the FOCUS group, learned last summer at FOCUS how to create a website, they utilized what they learned last summer to create a website as their project for the BLC. They researched ringworm, how to identify ringworm and how to cure ringworm. They found videos and YouTube clips and put them on their website which they shared with the entire school.
This group of students was a special group of students. They are a part of the FOCUS group, and they are fifth and sixth grade students. Last summer the students learned how to create a website, so one part of the competition was they had to create a project and they created a website, conducted research on ringworm, how to identify ringworm, how to cure ringworm. They found video and YouTube clips and put them on their website and we shared with their peers at school.
The second part of the challenge saw them having to build and program a robot to perform different tasks, including having the robot get the doctor from where he was stationed, and bring him to the base, and use a syringe.
Unfortunately, unlike other winners in the past, the T.G. Glover team will not represent The Bahamas at the FIRST (for inspiration and recognition of science and technology) Lego League (FLL) as it is under new ownership, and as The Bahamas is not a partner, the BLC winner could not compete. The Bahamas played under Florida for the past two years. BLC director Laurena Finlayson said she is working towards BLC becoming a partner for the next season that opens at the end of May. Once BLC becomes a partner Bahamian teams will be representing The Bahamas and won't have to play under Florida.
FLL introduces younger students to real-world engineering challenges by building LEGO-based robots to complete tasks on a thematic playing surface. FLL teams, guided by their imaginations and adult coaches, discover exciting career possibilities, and through the process, learn to make positive contributions to society.
The mission of FLL is to provide opportunities for students to engage in fun-filled experiential learning that will result in the development of a love for science and technology. Through the challenge, it is hoped that students will develop their creativity and learn to value diversity in all of its dimensions, while building lifelong skills like team building, leadership and embracing change.
"Besides introducing them to science, technology and math, it helps with their literacy skills, because they have to write the programs for the robot. They have to do the research. The coaches are their to guide them, but the students have to do all of the work themselves -- the research for the project, for the theme for that year," said Finlayson. "They have to put together a presentation for the judges, whether it be drama, Power point, art, however they feel fit, so along with literacy and math skills, we have found coaches in the past that have said they've seen a difference in their students. It also helps with some students who may have behavioral challenges, because the students and their parents have to sign a student contract saying they will follow the guidelines of FIRST Lego League, being on their best behavior at all times. If they break the contract they can be asked to leave the team or the day of the tournament at any given time."
FIRST Lego League in The Bahamas is for fourth through eighth grade-aged students. There is also a Junior FIRST Lego League for students who are kindergarten aged through third grade, Robotics for those in ninth through twelfth grades.
Teams consist of a minimum of five, maximum of 10 children. Participating teams do not have to be a team from a school, it can be a team from a community, a family, church, whomever.

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St. Thomas More School's Performance Art Department donates proceeds of 'Colors of Love Concert' to The Cancer Society of The Bahamas

March 18, 2015

St. Thomas More School sixth grade student Te'ja Munnings's breast cancer awareness initiative continues to spread as $771 -- proceeds from the school's Performance Art Department's recent Ribbons For Life: Colors of Love Concert was donated to The Cancer Society of The Bahamas.
Te'ja herself presented an additional $150 to The Cancer Society, the proceeds from her Ribbons For Life ribbons and cookie sales.
The St. Thomas More Performance Art Department under the direction of Adelia Davis and Nikki Carter staged the performance. The donation came from proceeds from the door admission.
Te'ja, 11 was pleased that she had brought the awareness to her school.
She is one of the youth who thinks about more than herself and how many presents she can get for special occasions.
For the last six months, Te'ja has been making and selling ribbons to raise funds to help find a cure and to assist The Cancer Society of The Bahamas and people suffering from cancer. Through her Ribbons For Life, Te'ja's mission is to bring awareness to children and young adults of the different cancers that affect people and to give back.
The St. Thomas More student learned how to make her ribbons with the help of a cousin, Erika Hamilton, with whom she had previously made bows. Hamilton helped Te'ja come up with the design for her cancer ribbon.
Te'ja's ribbons comprised of 11 of the 26 colors that are representative of cancers -- gold (childhood cancer), orange (Leukemia), lime green (Lymphoma), yellow (Sarcoma/bone cancer), purple (Pancreatic/Leomyosarcoma), periwinkle (esophageal cancer), teal (ovarian cancer), pink (breast cancer), navy (colon cancer), light blue (prostate cancer), and white (lung cancer), sell for $5 per ribbon.
The recent three-figure donation came on the heels of a previous three-figure donation Te'ja had made to the Cancer Society as recently as January.
The Cancer Society of The Bahamas is using the image of Te'ja's cancer ribbon on their flyers for their upcoming 14th Annual Ball to be held under the theme "Colors of Hope" on Saturday, May 23. They have also extended an invitation to the youngster who is eager to attend. Te'ja is also a nominee for the Primary School Student of the Year award, a ceremony that will be held on the same day as the ball. Her mother, Maranada Lightbourne, says she does not know how it will get done, but has promised her daughter that she will do her best to get her to both events. Te'ja has even gotten Hamilton to make her a dress in the color scheme of her ribbon to wear to the ball.

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Roberts and Johnson win U.S. Embassy Black History Month essay contest

March 18, 2015

Doris Johnson School's Tamia Roberts, and Kingsway Academy School's Alexia Johnson are the winners of the ninth United States Embassy Black History Month National High School Essay Contest, honoring the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who worked hard to highlight the importance of equality and human rights for all regardless of race, gender, religion, ethnicity, citizenship and socio-economic status.
The 12th grade students' winning entries were penned around the question: "What does equality and human rights mean to you? What can you do to promote equality and human rights in your community and throughout The Bahamas?"
Roberts whose essay was titled "Equality for All" focused on the need for gender equality. She wrote: "We cannot keep women and girls on the back burner of society. Women are not second-class citizens and must be treated equally. We must realize that by making it better for women, we are making it better for the entire society and the world."
Johnson wrote an essay titled "Rekindling the Dream" which focused on inequalities that remain in today's society and her hopes for a brighter future.
"Equality and human rights mean living in a world where there would be no more stories of Mike Browns and Trayvon Martins, and where children within the minority groups are not shot and killed because they look menacing. I ideate a society where I am treated the same as the modern day average white male; where my skin color and gender do not choose my path. I envision a world in which the events which are presently unraveling in North Korea are eradicated.
"Most of all, I see equality as a world where everybody is treated the same regardless of their race, sexual preference and gender; a world where every life matters. Equality, in my opinion, needs to become the forefront for not only world governments, but also for the everyday human."
Acting Deputy Chief of Mission Neda Brown made special visits to Doris Johnson High School and Kingsway Academy to present the two winners with the top prize of Microsoft Surface tablets.
Ethan Knowles, an 11th grade student at Queen's College finished second in this year's contest. Third place winners include LaTess Bartlett, an 11th grade student at Mary Star of the Sea School in Grand Bahama, and Pavel Bailey, a 12th grade student at Forest Heights Academy in Abaco. Runners-up were presented with new Apple iPads.
All of the top winners and their respective schools received a DVD documentary on the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as well as educational and Black History Month reading materials.

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Studying in Canada: Scholars blaze innovative career trails

March 18, 2015

With the support of The Canadian Lyford Cay Foundation, scholars Christopher Fernander and Nicola Smith are furthering their education and pioneering opportunities for Bahamians. Both scholars have chosen to pursue their education in Canada, a country widely known for its affordable living, diverse population, safe environment, low tuition fees and high standards in education.
"Through the Foundation, there are many opportunities for Bahamians to study abroad in Canada and come back to use their newly developed skills here in The Bahamas." said Maureen French, managing director of the Lyford Cay Foundations.
"We applaud Nicola and Christopher for blazing trails in innovative fields that are not often pursued."
Christopher Fernander is the recipient of a Technical Scholarship which he is using to study commercial diving at Holland College in Prince Edward Island, Canada. After being introduced to scuba diving in 10th grade, Fernander was hooked. He quickly advanced to higher levels of certification locally and began researching how he could transform his passion into a viable career.
Fernander is due to graduate with a certificate this year and will go on to attend Seneca College for a week-long dive medical technician course to further enhance his training, before returning home to New Providence to finish his tenure with the Royal Bahamas Defence Force while saving to start his own commercial dive company.
"Canada is very progressive and one thing I learnt is that the trades are just as important as your lawyers and doctors," said Fernander when asked how he felt about Bahamians pursuing scholarships to study in Canada. "The decision to study in Canada was well thought out and I have no regrets venturing this far away from home."
Graduate scholar Nicola Smith is equally enthusiastic about the support she's received from the Foundation. Smith is pursuing her Ph.D. in Marine Biology at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada.
Smith's inquisitive nature, outstanding academics accomplishments and appreciation for nature made marine biology a perfect career fit.
Smith is certain that she wants to return to The Bahamas upon graduation in 2017 and contribute to nation-building by helping to foster a culture of science where citizens make informed, evidence-based decisions about the environment. She believes that she will be able to use the knowledge and skills that she has acquired to teach at the tertiary level or act as an environmental consultant in the private or public sector.
Smith completed her Bachelor of Science in Toronto, her Masters of Science in Vancouver, and is now completing her Ph.D. just outside of Vancouver. Her extensive experience in Canada has given her insight into what the opportunity to study abroad could be like for other Bahamians.
"Studying in Canada has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. I feel most alive and fulfilled when I am in a safe, nurturing and intellectually challenging environment," said Smith.
"I can sum up what the scholarship means to me in one word -- opportunity," said the Canadian Lyford Cay Scholar. "Many people have dreams, perseverance, discipline and a strong work ethic. Unfortunately however, without access to the right opportunities, many people fail to accomplish their dreams."
The Canadian Lyford Cay Foundation awards are valued up to $15,000 per academic year with two special undergraduate awards valued up to $25,000 per academic year.
To learn more about scholarship opportunities with the Lyford Cay Foundations, visit www.lyfordcayfoundation.org. Online applications for Fall 2015 enrolment are due by April 15
About The Lyford Cay Foundation:
Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc. and The Canadian Lyford Cay Foundation are private philanthropic organizations established in 1969 and 1977, respectively. The Foundations' mission is to invest in learning opportunities for children, young adults, families and communities, all made possible by the generosity of donors. Through a variety of programs the Foundations assist children in school as they prepare for college, students leaving school with scholarships to attend college in The Bahamas and abroad, and non-profits providing learning opportunities. To date more than $45 million has been invested in the lives of Bahamians.

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We're all on a journey

March 18, 2015

Today's title is quite simple, and yet it most definitely contains a very important lesson in truth, we're all on a journey -- yes we are as we travel the road of life. So D. Paul, if we're on a journey as you put it during this lifetime, what is the actual destination that we're all supposed to be travelling to? Good question, which I will endeavor to answer to the satisfaction of all of my most valued readers.
I believe that like any long time journey, which we all hope our life is, there are many intermediary targets along the route, and then there is the final destination that we ultimately must get to. So we could quite rightly say that our intermediary destinations are a series of visits to success city as we attain our goals and objectives, one by one. However, having achieved our goals and thus finally reached success city, after a brief stop for rest and relaxation, we set out again as we journey onwards to the next success city on our route toward the ultimate destination.
So D. Paul you've really got me thinking now about what is the final destination? Well my friend the final destination that we all should be striving to reach is, a state of perfection. When we finally reach a state of perfection, then and only then are we ready to depart this existence on planet earth to live with our Creator forever. Now in all honesty, to finally reach this state of perfection, I believe that it will take several lifetimes, thus I personally believe in reincarnation.
Yes indeed, striving each and every day for perfection is the ultimate goal, the final target that we should all be striving to achieve as we journey along the road of life. So, the very important question which you need to ask yourself here today is this. Am I learning my lessons in living as I journey along the road of life, or do I keep on making the same mistakes over and over again? One thing is for sure -- you will never be able to eventually reach the target -- perfection, unless you keep on learning, keep on growing in knowledge and wisdom.
Think about it!

o Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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NEMA holds Water Rescue Training Course in Bimini

March 17, 2015

In continuing its mission to establishing disaster resilient communities throughout the islands...

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At S.T.R.A.W. Conference Young Women Asked to Make Wise Choices and Set Realistic Goals

March 17, 2015

Minister of Financial Services the Hon. Hope Strachan told female students from throughout New Providence as well as the islands of Andros and San Salvador...

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