Education

Tennessee couple creates scholarship for Bahamian students

January 28, 2015

A Franklin, Tennessee, couple who founded a network of substance-abuse treatment clinics has funded a special, targeted scholarship that will allow students from a high school in The Bahamas to attend Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU).
Michael and Tina Cartwright, who have a second home in The Bahamas, wanted to help students from L.N. Coakley High School in Great Exuma develop expertise through higher education that in turn would help benefit others on the island of Exuma.
The Cartwrights, who both attended MTSU, established a $600,000 scholarship fund that will cover tuition, housing and other expenses for four L.N. Coakley students to live and take classes on MTSU's Murfreesboro campus. The scholarship will renew after the first group of four honorees graduate from MTSU.
Michael Cartwright, chairman and co-founder of American Addiction Centers, made the scholarship announcement with MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, a native of The Bahamas.
"Tina and I understand the value of higher education," said Cartwright. "We approached President McPhee to establish a pathway that could recognize and reward future leaders who could return to Exuma as leaders and will help spur economic development on the island."
Jerome Fitzgerald, Bahamian minister of education, science and technology, said he was "humbled" by the Cartwrights' donation. "I applaud your initiative and fully endorse this endeavor that will greatly benefit the students of Exuma, the island of Exuma and, by extension, our country," he said.
McPhee said the Cartwrights wanted to make a targeted gift with an institution they trusted would help mold students into leaders for Exuma.
"Michael and Tina wanted to invest in MTSU, a known entity to them, to help people that they knew could benefit from mentoring, guidance and direction for this archipelago," said McPhee. "Our university will help prepare and educate the students selected for this honor to become leaders and influencers on the island. The Cartwrights hope that the recipients of their award will return to their home communities and contribute to the economic, social and cultural growth of Great Exuma."
McPhee said students must complete two experiential learning or community service projects in Great Exuma as a requirement of the award.
"Tina and I wanted to give something back to the people we've come to know, love and respect during our time in The Bahamas," said Cartwright. "MTSU offers a unique experience to transform the lives of those selected for this program."
Cartwright, a noted behavioral health entrepreneur, oversees a company that operates six inpatient substance abuse treatment centers across the United States. The company traded publicly on the New York Stock Exchange late last year as AAC Holdings Inc., based in Brentwood, Tennessee.
"We are proud of the Cartwrights and appreciate the confidence they have placed in MTSU to effect change in a community that they value," said McPhee. "Their gift is a significant financial contribution that over time will transform the lives of the recipients and the community of Exuma."
McPhee has made targeted international enrollment a strategic priority for the university. MTSU's international student enrollment has doubled from 396 to 789 in five years, and it had 335 students studying abroad last summer.

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Lyford Cay Foundation Scholarship application open

January 28, 2015

The Lyford Cay Foundations' online application for scholarships to study at post-secondary institutions abroad is now open. All applications must be completed and submitted through the Foundation's website www.lyfordcay foundation.org. The deadline for all applications and corresponding documentation is April 15, 2015.
Lyford Cay Foundations offer scholarships to Bahamian citizens to complete Bachelor's and Master's degrees as well as technical and vocational training programs. Prospective applicants must provide an acceptance letter from the institution of their choosing located in the U.S., Canada, U.K., Europe or Caribbean.
The criteria considered includes financial need and capacity, academic merit, accreditation of institution, availability of field of study in The Bahamas, career goal and personal qualifications.
Special named awards are available for study in business, theology, fine arts, economics, engineering, law (graduate level), architecture and special education. To date more than 1,400 scholarships have been awarded to bright Bahamian scholars.
Scholarship awards range in value up to $15,000 per year and are renewable annually given a minimum grade point average is maintained. Special awards valued up to $25,000 are available for first generation college students studying in Canada.
All scholarship decisions are made by an independent committee that includes previous scholarship recipients. Decisions are usually communicated in late June or early July.
All interested persons are invited to an application help session at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture on Thompson Blvd. on Thursday, February 12 and Thursday, March 19. For additional information about the Foundations' educational awards, and to apply, visit www.lyfordcayfoundation.org or call 242-362-4910.

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The battle of the mind

January 28, 2015

At the time of writing this particular article there are an awful lot of battles going on around this great big world of ours, and more's the pity. However, much nearer to home so to speak there's a daily battle going on whose outcome is extremely important to the very future of your life. And D. Paul where exactly is that battle which you're referring to going on as I thank God I live in a relatively peaceful atmosphere in the country of my birth, no one is at war with anyone where I reside. Well my friend, the war that I'm referring to here today is much closer than you may think, for it's going on each and every day within you, it's the battle of the mind.
One of those battles that take place day after day within all of our minds is the battle between what we see as logical thoughts and conclusions, and totally illogical thoughts and conclusions. In other words we consider a particular problem we're endeavoring to solve pertaining to our work. Now, the very first solution that comes to our mind is a totally logical one. However, then as we think it through and ponder our options, a solution springs into our mind which may indeed appear to be completely illogical to others, and yet it really is quite a brilliant idea, which if it works will indeed solve the problem in a most brilliant yet perhaps controversial way.
So the battle begins the battle of the mind. Do you go for the most logical and perhaps safe solution, or do you opt to go with, what will appear to others to be a completely illogical, perhaps kind of crazy solution? My friend, these kinds of battles go on within all of our minds daily and thus have to be dealt with.
So in spite of being brought up in an extremely negative atmosphere when you were young, you've been to some illuminating, enlightening seminars and read many great books about positive thinking, thus you're doing your very best to stop being negative and instead become much more positive. So the battle rages all day long as you determine to defeat all of your negative thoughts and allow positivity to ultimately win this most important battle. Don't forget your daily prayer and meditation sessions, as these practices will assist you tremendously as you participate in the battle of the mind, always making absolutely sure that the good guys win.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Happy pets are healthy pets

January 26, 2015

This was the overarching message Dr. Bridgette Johnson, President of the Bahamas Veterinary Association, delivered to years four, five, and six students at St. Andrews School on January 21...

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Top Achievers Award for BJC and BGCSE Top Achievers Awarded for BJC and BGCSE Examination Results

January 26, 2015

The Ministry of Education, Science and Technology recognized the accomplishments of students excelling in the Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC) and Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE)...

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Eleuthera Students Join Protection of the Kirtland Warbler Initiative
Eleuthera Students Join Protection of the Kirtland Warbler Initiative

January 26, 2015

Students throughout South Eleuthera were in for a wild treat last week, as Bahamas National Trust (BNT) Education Officer, Scott Johnson traveled across the island to teach them about the Kirtland’s Warbler...

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Basket Ball Champion "Dr. J" visits COB

January 23, 2015

Ex-NBA Champion, All-Star and one of the greatest players in NBA history, Julius "Dr. J" Erving made a stop at The College of The Bahamas' Harry B. Moore Library...

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Bahamas Launches 19CCEM as Host of Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers
Bahamas Launches 19CCEM as Host of Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers

January 22, 2015

19CCEM Website Launched http://www.bahamas.gov.bs/19ccem...

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The Super! Program that continues to Inspire Super Kids

January 21, 2015

Students from grades 4 to 6 at Gerald Cash Primary eagerly participated in Super Me! activities (Photo by Aletha Cooper)...

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COB President makes courtesy call on the Governonr General

January 21, 2015

Dr. Rodney Smith, President of the College of The Bahamas, along with members of the faculty called upon Her Excellency Dame Marguerite Pindling...

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Learning new lessons

January 21, 2015

All-Bahamas Merit Scholar Shannon Butler is finally in the trenches and loving it.
The second year university student who is in his first year of medicine at St. Andrew's University in Scotland returns to university on Friday to commence the second semester of his first year of medicine, and looking forward to it.
"My lectures are really interesting ... dissection practicals are great ... labs are great," said Shannon, 19. "We have a pretty decent schedule, with a lot of free time to study and consolidate what we're learning in lectures, and we have course work which I love."
The 2013 All-Bahamas Merit Scholarship winner, a graduate of Queen's College (QC), who wants to specialize in cardiothoracic surgery said one semester into the six-year medical program has taught him a lot -- not just about medicine, but about medical school, and how different it is from regular university.
"My workload was probably the equivalent of seven or eight college classes," he said of last semester, which saw him engaged in a little of everything medically from anatomy, to physiology, pathology, hematology, molecular medicine, pharmacology, medical ethics, public health and so much more.
The end result of that first intense medical semester is that Shannon has about 1,000 pages of personal notes from just one semester.
"But it's taught me that it's not just like regular college, and it's not good enough to study every day, which is what I was doing. I had to study as effectively as possible every single day just to keep up with all of the material that I had to cover," he said.
Although Shannon sat end-of-term examinations before the Christmas break, he won't know his results until he returns to university as the papers are marked after they return. But he still feels good about what his results will be.
"I am confident in what I've done," he said. "I did well on my mid-terms ... I got a 90 percent on that which put me in the top 10 percent of the 170 people in my year group, so that went well," said the lone Bahamian in the program.
And he's looking forward to delving into the intensity of the medical program when he returns. He also used time during the break to study and make notes on lectures he didn't get a chance to make last semester. He also read up on the subjects that they are going to cover when he returns. A strong focus for the upcoming semester he said would be the musculoskeletal system including all of the upper and lower limbs.
The year he graduated high school, Shannon amassed $146,000 in scholarships to help fund his education -- the All Bahamas Merit Scholar, a four-year $140,000 scholarship. He was also named the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity's 2013 valedictorian and awarded a $6,000 scholarship.
He also distinguished himself with an impressive academic record having achieved 10 Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) awards with nine A grades and one B grade. The results earned him the award for the best BGCSE results in the country; the best results from an independent school student and the highest award in mathematics.
The son of Peter and Wendy Butler and big brother to Reese, 15, a 10th grade student at QC, Shannon has always said he hopes to be the best role model he can be and show Reese how to be disciplined when it comes to schoolwork and to have fun when it's time.
With Shannon away from home for most of the year, he still takes his sibling responsibilities seriously and talks to Reese about what he's going through. But Shannon admits that he doesn't know if his brother really listens or not.
"I just try to basically tell him what's going to happen in the future, not really advise him, but just to prepare him so he's not shocked by it all. I try to tell him that he has to give his best, buckle down, even though it will be hard definitely, but that it will pass and he will get through it, and the grades at the end of the day will be worth it."
While Shannon says his brother is doing well and getting good grades, he said Reese's personality is different from his and more carefree.
"When I was his age I think I was a bit more focused on my academics than he is right now, but I would not change his personality for the world," he said.
As his Christmas break comes to an end, Shannon, who will always have the title All Bahamas Merit Scholar, the country's premier educational award attached to his name, said he sometimes forgets that he picked up the title.
The All-Bahamas Merit Scholarship is granted by the Lyford Cay Foundation Inc., and awarded to the single most outstanding applicant coming out of high school annually.
"Honestly, sometimes I actually forget, but I think that might be for the best because the pressure can get to you to be honest. To know that so many people are not even counting on you to succeed -- but expecting you to succeed and expecting nothing less. But at the end of the day I just try to do my best and try to be an example for people coming behind me," he said.

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BTVI students fulfill graduation requirements

January 21, 2015

The skills learned at the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI) are now being applied in the workplace by 67 students on four-week internships for the spring semester.
Interns will work for 40 hours a week each, amounting to 160 hours -- a requirement for graduation, and are experiencing work life at various organizations -- Culmer's Plumbing and Platinum Welding, the Ministry of Education, the Bahamas Electricity Corporation and the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC).
The Student Affairs Department held a seminar prior to the commencement of internships, with Student Affairs Coordinator Racquel Bethel giving them advice they would need to be successful in the workplace. She told students that the experience was not only about skills but work ethics as well.
"Add value to the institution you're going to," Bethel advised the students. "Have the right attitude. Don't go in there with the mind to show off. Every organization has a corporate culture. Go to learn. You're not to go there to be the boss and take over," she cautioned.
Office assistant student, Mitzi Sanches, 18, said she expected to gain work experience from her internship and to complete all tasks assigned to her, even the challenging ones.
"I want to gain knowledge every day if possible while networking."
Keisa Knowles, who is studying towards an Associate's of Applied Science degree in Information Technology Management, said BTVI has prepared her well to enter the workplace.
"This internship is a chance to exercise everything I've learned such as disassembling and assembling laptops and desktops," she said. "Initially, I saw BTVI as just a place to gain knowledge, but it's not just an institution. I've gained a family," said the 25-year-old.
Dean of Construction Trades Alexander Darville encouraged the interns to apply safety rules while on the job.
"Regardless of your discipline, closed shoes are important -- whether you are at the office or on the construction site. If you are sitting on a chair that is rocky, you need to respectfully say something because it could injure your back. What you would have learned here, express it," said Darville.
Beyond the necessary paper work, Darville further suggested to students to keep a personal diary of their internship, documenting experiences and evaluating their performance and growth at the culmination of the four weeks.

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Mission: Educate Bahamas Foundation raises 193K

January 21, 2015

Eight local businesses and organizations contributed a combined $193,000 to the "Mission: Educate Bahamas Foundation" in a newly formed private/public sector partnership geared towards improving education in public primary schools.
The funding was provided by Furniture Plus Co. Ltd., Kelly's House and Home, Fidelity Merchant Bank, Royal Bank Of Canada, Caribbean Bottling Co., Credit Suisse, The Cable Cares Foundation, and Len-Glo Bus Service of Andros will facilitate the immediate expansion of the breakthrough, melodic learning program "TuneIn To Reading (TiR) Program" throughout Government Primary Schools throughout the country.
Several additional primary schools are now able to receive the necessary laptop computers, headsets, instructional teacher training, and TiR software needed to facilitate the program and bring them on stream, according to Minister of Education, Science and Technology Jerome Fitzgerald. He also said that in the coming weeks several Members Of Parliament including himself, will invest an additional $160,000 from their respective constituency allowance into the TiR expansion.
"Research shows how effectively children learn with emerging tools for the classroom that enhance the teaching and learning process through the use of interactive technology. This is particularly so for primary schools, where students' future success depends heavily on their experiences in the early grades," said Fitzgerald. "Consequently, there is a demand for more innovative programs such as TuneIn To Reading that will captivate young students' interests and allow them to improve their reading skills in an interactive and enjoyable way."
TiR uses music-based computer lessons to help students improve in the areas of literacy, reading fluency, comprehension and word-sight recognition. The US-based program is designed to reach struggling readers where they are, allowing children of varying reading levels to learn side-by-side in a classroom setting without the social stigma of being placed in lower-level classes.
TiR was launched in New Providence, four years ago by brothers Christopher and Terry Tsavoussis, proprietors of Wendy's Bahamas and Marco's Pizza. It debuted at Columbus Primary School.
Over the years Wendy's has spent in excess of $351,000 to get the program up and running in 14 local public primary schools. On average, students using the program demonstrate reading gains of 1.4 to two years, after only nine weeks of use, comprising of three 30-minute sessions each week. In addition to the strides made in reading, teachers and administrators have praised the program for restoring excitement, enthusiasm and a renewed sense of confidence among their students.
"Mission: Educate Bahamas" is purposed to increase literacy and improve our students' learning abilities through technology-based tools that enhance and deepen their learning experience," said Tsavoussis. "I am extremely grateful for the support of our corporate and private sponsors, and can report that together our private/public sector partnership will continue to move literacy and education to new and exciting frontiers in this country."
The "Mission: Educate Bahamas Foundation" is committed to providing local schools and educators with technology-based tools to boost literacy and improve student education, engagement and empowerment. For more info, or to donate visit: www.missioneducatebahamas.com.

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Mental vitamins

January 21, 2015

There's no doubt about it, a whole lot of people have become a lot more health conscious than they used to be and are thus concentrating on ways in which they can be more fit. So they eat right, exercise regularly and take a whole lot of supplements, vitamins, minerals, etc. to augment their perhaps deficient diet. Yes indeed, health stores are springing up all over the place as people concentrate on improving their health, thus these health conscious people are taking a whole lot of vitamins daily. If you were to visit my home you'd note that I take a whole lot of vitamins, and indeed have been for years.
But my friend, when we speak about health, we need to realize that it must encompass, not just our physical body but also our mental state and spiritual understanding. Yes indeed, whenever we discuss the subject of health, we must of necessity include body, mind and spirit for they're all a part of total health. So that brings me to the title of today's article, "Mental vitamins."
So what are the "mental vitamins" which we need to partake of to supplement our mental health? Well the first "natural vitamin," so to speak, which we need in very large doses, is "Vitamin L" for love. That's right -- to maintain a healthy mind it most definitely needs large helpings of "Vitamin L" of love. Firstly, we must love ourselves unconditionally so that we have a good self-image, which in turn is absolutely vital to good mental health, which in turn will contribute to excellent overall health of body, mind and spirit.
Yes my friend, as James Allen said in his book "As A Man Thinketh", "The body is the servant of the mind. It obeys the mind." Yes it does. So we need to keep it full of positive thoughts. To do this, we must take a daily dose of "Vitamin I" for inspiration. I sincerely hope that I give you an adequate dose of "Vitamin I inspiration" through these daily articles. So do make sure that you get a whole lot of inspiration each and every day, as it is vital for good mental health.
Finally, you need "Vitamin M Meditation". That's right, as I state over and over, you need to spend some time each day in the silence, replenishing your whole being with spiritual substance which will believe me, keep you healthy and strong, across the board.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Oakes Field Primary School teachers show appreciation to their students

January 21, 2015

Teacher Appreciation Days are intended to be special days for the appreciation of teachers and may include celebrations to honor them for their contributions, but in a twist on the norm, the teachers at Oakes Field Primary School decided to show appreciation to the student populace with their recent Students Appreciation Week celebration. Their rationale for the week dedicated to their students was to reinforce the importance of students' understanding that they are unique and appreciated; to celebrate their students and give back to them for all that they continuously do for the school; and heighten the awareness of the beauty of childhood and expose the students to old school games such as ring play, jacks, flying kites and hopscotch.
During the week, the teachers showed appreciation to their students in the class through poem, song and storytelling. Teachers also gave their students a piece of healthy fruit and a sweet treat. During an assembly put on by the teachers each student was also presented with a medal keepsake inscribed with the words "you are unique."
In a fun twist to the week, teachers also got to dress in school uniforms and hosted their students to class parties on the day. And on the final day of the week teachers brought back the "good ole days" to students, engaging them in outdoor games and play in the yard through games that the teachers themselves once played as a child. As a bonus, during Students Appreciation Week, students received no homework.

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19th Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers

January 20, 2015

The website (http://www.bahamaas.gov.bs/19ccem) for the 19th Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers (19CCEM) was officially launched during a press briefing at the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MOEST), Friday, January 16...

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Super Unique Celebration at Oakes Field Primary School

January 19, 2015

Teachers at Oakes Field Primary School showed appreciation for their students in a thrilling week of “You are Unique” activity and fun, January 13-16...

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Educate Bahamas Foundation raises $193k from local business to boost Literacy in Primary Schools

January 19, 2015

Eight local businesses, and organizations generously contributed a combined 193K to the Mission: Educate Bahamas Foundation in a newly formed private/public sector partnership geared toward improving education in our public primary schools...

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Graduation of New Aviation Security Officer and Passenger Screeners

January 19, 2015

The Airport Authority held Graduation Ceremonies for Twenty-four new Aviation Security Officers and Aviation Passenger Screeners, January 15th, 2015 in The New Providence Community Center on Blake Road...

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Students Excel at 12th Primary Mathematics Student's Workshop

January 17, 2015

For the twelfth year, in order to support the commitment of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology to raise the level of numeracy skills, the Primary Curriculum Section of the Department of Education...

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