Education

Baha Mar's third Leadership Development Institute class welcomes individuals with intellectual and developmental disorders

July 30, 2014

Baha Mar is providing true inclusion for all Bahamians, with more opportunities than ever before for individuals with intellectual and developmental disorders (IDD). On Monday, the Leadership Development Institute (LDI), a non-profit training organization supported by Baha Mar began its third session.
LDI creates opportunities for Bahamians from all backgrounds to be trained and to potentially join the Baha Mar team. In this recent session, LDI broke new ground by not only doubling of the class size but also by taking the unprecedented step to include people with IDD in the program.
More than 200 new LDI students and their parents gathered in the Rainforest Theater at the Crystal Palace Training Hotel for the LDI orientation session. However, for the six individuals with IDD and their parents, the meeting represented so much more.
Through a revolutionary program, Baha Mar has partnered with Best Buddies International, founded by Anthony Kennedy Shriver in 1989, to allow individuals with IDD to join Baha Mar's transformative Leadership Development Institute. Over the years, Best Buddies International has partnered with organizations throughout the United States and in 50 countries around the world, assisting with training and creating integrated social and employment opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities including autism and Down syndrome. The partnership with Baha Mar marks the first Best Buddies International venture in the region.
Best Buddies candidates were identified with the assistance of local IDD advocates, including Dr. Michelle Major, director of the Seahorse Institute, a non-profit organization that provides treatment for people with autism and other developmental delays, and Mario Carey, president of R.E.A.C.H. Bahamas, an autism advocacy and support group.
Baha Mar's Chief Marketing Officer Denise Godreau, was humbled by the opportunity to be a part of the revolutionary program that is transforming not only the resort experience in The Bahamas, but the way that people with IDD are perceived.
Godreau, who is also the mother of a child with IDD, said there is no better way to transform The Bahamas, Baha Mar's employees and the guest experience than by creating programs like LDI that can tap into the unrealized potential in members of our community.
"For me personally, it's a great day. I have a daughter with IDD, and I'm incredibly excited that we are able to have this opportunity in The Bahamas," she said, wiping away tears. "The Best Buddies program at Baha Mar is going to change everyone for the better. Baha Mar and LDI are already changing lives through providing a chance for Bahamians to create a better future, but having candidates with IDD at LDI, and eventually at Baha Mar, will make us all more grateful, humble and joyful."
The Best Buddies program affords individuals with IDD the same chances to succeed as other young people enrolled in LDI. Through LDI, Baha Mar is helping to increase the integration of people living with IDD in our community by providing them with the tools and opportunities that they need to succeed in the workplace and the chance to secure a job at the luxury $3.5 billion resort.
The integration of Best Buddies with LDI has received strong support from parents of young adults with IDD and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) within the community who have lauded LDI as a transformative program.
Raymond Gaitor is the father of 20-year-old Jonathan, a graduate of Anatol Rodgers High School with IDD. Gaitor describes Best Buddies and LDI as a godsend.
"As a member of R.E.A.C.H., this is one of the things we have been hoping for over the years. It is similar to a sheltered workshop where companies introduce the kids to a work environment, getting them comfortable with responsibilities," Gaitor explained.
Carey said that parents with children who have IDD now have hope.
"Typically, in The Bahamas, kids with IDD graduate from school at 19 years old, and they go home. They don't have the chance to be a part of society. That puts a lot of stress on families," he explained. "If we can get them into the workforce, the domino effect is huge. We're so happy to have this program in The Bahamas."
Each IDD student has been paired with a student 'buddy' in LDI for the duration of the 16-week class session. During those sessions, LDI students will learn functional and technical skills, service skills, leadership training and life skills, part of LDI's overall vision to create opportunities for all Bahamians, including those with unrealized potential.
According to LDI Executive Director Jeffrey Lloyd, all students will be treated fairly and encouraged to take advantage of all opportunities, to exceed expectations, to help each other and to thrive as part of a community.
"These students are making history because they are enrolled in the largest LDI class to-date. Not only because enrollment has doubled, but also because LDI is welcoming individuals who are intellectually and developmentally challenged," Lloyd said.
Participant Danor McKinney was thrilled to be a part of the new LDI class and get his feet wet in the field of hospitality.
"I'm excited about it because it leaves a lot of opportunities for young folks of our age and it opens up a lot of doors," McKinney explained.
The third session of LDI began on July 21 and will run until early November. To learn more about LDI and how to apply, visit LDI Baha Mar on Facebook or e-mail LDI@bahamar.com.

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Keeping focused

July 30, 2014

Just over the halfway mark into the fourth annual FOCUS Summer SLAM, the program's doors were opened to allow donors, students, family members and education officials to see students enrolled in the program in action during an All School Rally at The College of The Bahamas.
An initiative of the Lyford Cay Foundation, FOCUS is a tuition-free, school enrichment program that sets primary school students on an eight-year path to college and career success. Lessons take place during the school year and for 30 days in the summer.
This year, FOCUS is serving 152 students in grades five through eight who have been working together in small groups to complete projects that demonstrate this summer's information theme.
Students entering grades five and six with the new academic year were tasked with creating websites that communicate feasible waste management solutions for New Providence. Students entering grades seven and eight were charged with using geographic information systems (GIS) technology to map an efficient bus route system for FOCUS students.
Jasmine Roker, a sixth grade student at T.G. Glover Primary School, who has been in FOCUS for two years, said the program has helped her.
"FOCUS has helped me in school. The things I didn't know, FOCUS picked me up and helped me with them. And FOCUS teachers teach me different things," she said. "The best part about being in FOCUS is that I get to meet new people and also I get a boost to learning."
Students are recruited in fourth grade from public primary schools in New Providence's northwestern district (East Street through to Bain and Grants Town and up to Gambier Village). FOCUS' mission is that through additional educational support and enrichment activities, the students would be the first in their families to attend tertiary learning institutions.
Olivia Johnson, the mother of Amile Johnson, a fifth grade FOCUS student, has seen first-hand the program's accomplishments.
"For me, the best part is his mind is constantly going. He's constantly thinking; he's learning more, and I'm learning because he's talking about all the biomedical waste and all that. So whatever he's learning here, he's bringing it home and it's challenging him, because he's says to me, 'Oh, mommy I never knew about this,'" said Johnson.
All FOCUS programs take place at The College of The Bahamas' Oakes Field campus.

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COB chooses Rodney Smith as president
COB chooses Rodney Smith as president

July 28, 2014

THE College Council of the College of the Bahamas (COB) has recommended that Dr Rodney Smith be chosen as COB's new president, according to a statement by Council president Alfred Sears...

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Social promotion or an earned right

July 23, 2014

The first day of school is always a sight to behold -- children with their perfectly coiffed hair, uniforms starched to perfection and spit-shined shoes. But do people ever stop to wonder how many of these children have moved on to the next grade level because they have earned the right and are not advancing through social promotion -- a practice that has always been a part of the school system and is still prevalent today, according to educators.
Social promotion is the practice of promoting students along from grade to grade with their peers, even if the students have not satisfied academic requirements or met performance standards at key grades. It is called social promotion because it is often carried out in the perceived interest of a student's social and psychological wellbeing. At the same time, it has been shown that the practice of having students repeat a grade often has negative educational consequences, hence the social promotion.
The issue of social promotion came to light after The Nassau Guardian viewed the report card of a nine-year-old, fourth grade student whose summer grade point average (GPA) was listed as 2.04 -- and had one A grade, two B grades, four C grades, 1 D grade and eight E grades, and wondered how the grades added up.
The Nassau Guardian polled a number of educators who were given the student's letter grades to calculate a GPA based on the Ministry of Education's grading system, which they said was standard across the board. Two of the educators calculated a GPA of 1.1875 (which they said was rounded up to 1.19); another two educators said their calculations were 1.19 -- a stark difference from the 2.04 on the report.
All of the educators canvassed expressed shock at the 2.04 GPA given, considering the letter grades, but spoke with The Nassau Guardian on condition of anonymity.
In the teacher's comments section, the teacher wrote that the student had struggled through the academic year largely in part to the child's lack of focus during lessons; the student, the teacher said, was too easily distracted. The teacher urged the parents to encourage the child to work harder in fifth grade, but there was no mention of possibly the child having to repeat.
The educators who spoke with The Nassau Guardian weren't surprised. They said social promotion has always been a part of the school system and is prevalent today. They said social promotion is seen as necessary due to an issue with space and being able to allow children to move on so that other students can move up, but it also creates a problem if the child is unable to gain the skills he or she needs to achieve higher level.
On the flip side, the educators said that keeping a child back can scar the student for life and, in some cases, the child that is held back ends up being the bully in class due to being older and bigger than peers.
A senior in the tourism sector (who preferred to remain anonymous) said she remembers having to repeat eighth grade at a top private school due to her grade point average being below that required to be promoted to ninth grade. She said her mother gave her the option of repeating the grade in the private school or entering the government school sector. The woman said she preferred to not repeat because she would have been embarrassed. She was enrolled in a government school, where she proceeded to achieve honor roll status every year until she graduated.
Most of the educators who spoke with The Nassau Guardian said a child with eight E grades on a report card needs special and immediate intervention.
"A red flag should have gone up for quite some time," said one educator. "The grades tell me that it's not a new problem, but an old problem, and I would probably want to provide that child with some form of intervention in the resource room, pull out programs, call in special services...whatever," said the educator.
Another educator said the "E" grades meant nothing.
"That child is performing at the lowest level possible, based on the grading systems out of 5 -- A, B, C, D and E."
The student, who was not taught at any of the schools of the educators that The Nassau Guardian spoke with, said there needed to be a secondary check of the grades and the GPA given.
"By looking at these grades and looking at the GPA, something is definitely wrong and so it would have been checked. I know most schools are computerized in using the reporting system, and so most times you will get an error, so you will have to go back and repost, and re-average to come up with the correct GPA," said one educator.
As to whether she thought the child was being socially promoted, the educator was noncommittal.
"Again, it all depends. We have students in our system who do not function like the mainstream students -- we have students who are autistic, so many of our teachers are not quite able to deal with them, and so we look for a resource person or other persons who can teach these students, based on their learning level."
The educator also said that the grades reflected could have been because the child was not being taught based on his or her learning style, and that the student was only getting the umbrella-type teaching.
According to the educator, the child's parents needed to be called in for a discussion with them over the ramifications surrounding the child's grades and learning; the parents should also be encouraged to work with the child at home. At school, she said, an intervention strategy needed to be plotted for the child -- even if it meant bringing the child in on a Saturday morning.
The educator would have asked for the child to be retested, to see where the student was academically, taking his or her level from there and moving on.
"There are adults who can't take exams and they hyperventilate in exams," said the educator. "I know our ministry was speaking about oral exams for kids who can't take a written exam, to give them an oral exam to help them along, but that has not materialized. We're still into the paper and pen."
As to whether the child should be promoted or repeated, the educator said if the child had been repeated previously he or she should not repeat again.
On the report card, the child's teacher commented satisfactorily on all traits except one -- the child was given a "U" grade which stands for unsatisfactory in work habits, which the educator said spoke volumes concerning the student's lack of focus.
"Their study habits are not there. Their classroom work habit is limited. It seems this child was very easily distracted," said the educator.
Another educator was astounded that the child had eight E grades in reading subjects -- comprehension and literature; language arts subjects -- written composition and grammar and usage; mathematics subjects -- concepts of numbers, computation and application and religious education.
Ministry of Education core subjects include mathematics, language arts, social science, religious studies and physical education.
The educator expressed curiosity over whether the child's teacher had made contact with the parents and told the parents that their child was at risk for failure.
"What parent would want to receive a report card with eight 'E' grades? A lot of variables would come into play," said another educator.
One thing the educator was absolutely certain of was that, based on the letter grades, the 2.04 GPA was totally incorrect.
"I don't care what system they are using -- a 2.04 as GPA is not correct. It just could not add up, not with eight E grades. I'm not sure what system the teacher is using as well -- maybe it erred. When you use some form of electronic system, it gives room for error," said the educator.
The educator was uncertain whether the child was being socially promoted.
"I'm not sure that the teacher wants to promote someone with those grades. I would want to see some form of intervention."
The unsatisfactory grade given to the student under traits also spoke volumes about the educator.
Not a fan of repeating students, the educator believes students should move along with their peers, but added services should be provided for the student to assist him or her in the upcoming grade. The educator said collaboration was needed between the parents and the teacher. The educator also called for the child to be tested.
"My first concern is always for the student, and we have to do right by them. A lot of students come with issues and they may have some challenges in terms of academics, but I believe all children are educable, as long as they can learn. I think we do our very best as educators to ensure that they receive some kind of formal education, and in doing so, if you find the child is still failing, then you need to go out of school and provide the child with the services that are available."
If the child had been in the school at which the Guardian Lifestyles source taught, according to the educator, the child would have been referred to a guidance counselor in the first instance, who would then have referred the child to special services, if it was necessary. Special services would have tried to find some form of intervention for the child in the school environment. In the event of such an intervention not working, the educator said the child would probably be placed in a self-contained program like Stapledon School or the incoming special needs program that will be opened in September at the Our Lady's Catholic Primary School site.
The educator also had advice for fellow colleagues to be very careful in working out students' grades. The educator said when something is put in black and white that it's very difficult to take back.
"Teachers have to be efficient, proficient and transparent in their grades. I would double-check all of my work to ensure that the GPA is correct before I hand it out to parents."
The Nassau Guardian reached out to Ministry of Education, Science and Technology officials who declined to comment.

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Lyford Cay Foundation grants 15,000 to REACH summer camp

July 23, 2014

Lyford Cay Foundation awarded a $15,000 grant to the non-profit organization REACH (Resources and Education for Autism and Related Challenges) to help facilitate the organization's 14th annual summer camp for students with autism spectrum disorders. Funding from the foundation allowed the group to accept more than 90 students, the largest number of participants in the camp's history. In line with the foundation's mission, the camp is free to all participants and offers an inclusive environment that allows students to stay engaged and continue learning throughout the summer.
The four-week program was held at T.G. Glover Primary School. Classes were facilitated by special education teachers, assistants and aides. Camp Co-coordinator Teri-Gaye Vassell said that no child was turned away and the group accepted siblings and students without autistic spectrum disorders in order to help special students develop social behavioral skills.
This year's theme, 'All Things Bright and Beautiful', had students learning about creation, nature and wildlife through crafts, music and caring for animals and plants.
"REACH's mandate embodies the foundation's mission to serve those most in need in the community," said Maureen French, Lyford Cay Foundation's managing director. "Our donors and board of directors are amazed by REACH's commitment to integrate children with autism spectrum disorders into society. We are proud to partner with REACH and inspired by their work."

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Chantal Adderley named to Maine Maritime Academy Dean's List for spring 2014

July 23, 2014

CASTINE, Maine - Chantal Adderley of New Providence was recently named to the Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) dean's list for outstanding academic achievement in the second semester of the 2013-2014 academic year. She is studying marine transportation operations. Students named to the dean's list earn a grade point average of 3.3 or above.
Maine Maritime Academy is a co-educational, public college on the coast of Maine offering 18 degree programs in engineering, management, science and transportation. MMA students benefit from hands-on instruction, international sea time aboard the Training Ship State of Maine and Schooner Bowdoin, cadet shipping aboard commercial vessels and cooperative education assignments.

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RBC sends primary school student to summer camp

July 23, 2014

Valencia R. Richardson, a fifth grade student at Uriah McPhee Primary School, was the recipient of the RBC Innovative Science Summer Camp Scholarship.
Valencia was selected as the recipient by her school as a result of her stellar school record, including regular school attendance, academics and positive school spirit.
"My two weeks at Innovative Science Summer Camp was an exciting learning experience," said Richardson. "We learned how things around us work and about nature. The rocket blasting was great. Science camp was fun because it was hands-on. I thank RBC for the opportunity."
RBC Royal Bank sponsored the camp financially in the form of the scholarship that was awarded to Valencia as well as a contribution toward the camp's general expenses.
"We are proud to sponsor the Innovative Science Summer Camp," said Jan Knowles, RBC manager, public relations and corporate communications. "RBC firmly believes every child needs and deserves our complete commitment so they can be healthy in mind, body and spirit."
The mission of Innovative Science Summer Camp is to make science and learning about science a fun experience for children. Participants at the camp conducted experiments to test their hypotheses to scientific questions that they had always wanted to know the answers to. They learned how to recycle and what items are able to be recycled in The Bahamas. Campers also grew crystals and made designer candles, ice cream and goo. The camp culminated with a parents' day, during which parents were invited to see what the students learned during the camp. During parents' day, each child made a presentation explaining how he or she formed a project hypothesis and the research he or she undertook to test the hypothesis.
"Science education and the important role it plays in the development of children usually takes a back seat to reading and math," said Sheena Davis, president of Innovative Science. "Although these subjects are crucial, the role science plays in the educational development of children needs to be acknowledged. Everything we do on a daily basis involves science -- from breathing to growing our food. Science education fuels the natural curiosity that children have and provides them not only with a potential future career, but valuable critical thinking skills that they will use throughout all of life."
Davis said in a global economy where innovation provides a competitive edge, science education is important to the advancement of children.
She thanked RBC for its sponsorship of the camp and the scholarship that provided an opportunity for a child to grow and develop through science.
Innovative Science is run all year and provides after-school programs, in-class workshops, science-themed birthday parties, corporate fun days and environmental awareness exhibitions.
"Our summer camp and after-school program students have primarily come from the private school system, but this year, through the support of our scholarship donors, including RBC, we were able to host three students from the public school system," said Davis.

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The end is the beginning

July 23, 2014

I bumped into someone some days ago who was obviously, to use the popular vernacular, down in the dumps, she was quite miserable and appeared to be about ready to burst into tears. I enquired if anything was wrong, as she just didn't appear to be her old, upbeat self. She informed me as she looked at me with a rather forlorn look on her face and very doleful eyes which appeared to be red and slightly swollen obviously from a whole lot of crying, that her personal relationship had come to a rather abrupt ending as her partner, whom she had planned on getting married to in a short time, had in fact got engaged to someone else which he informed her about the night before. So his relationship to her had indeed come to a very abrupt end.
She had been in a relationship with this man for years and really did feel that it would last and stand the test of time. We went for coffee and I did my very best to console and comfort this distraught young lady in her hour of need. Over the next few weeks, I spoke with this young lady quite often on the phone. as she would call me to share her feelings with me.
The main message which I did my very best to get firmly planted in her consciousness is the fact, that just because her relationship had come to an end, it was certainly not the end of her life. There would be other relationships in the future. After all, this beautiful young lady was only in her 40s and had indeed a whole lot going for her. I impressed on her that the end is the beginning.
You see, I remember well when someone left me in a similar situation many years ago and I was absolutely broken-hearted. At that time, an extremely spiritual friend said to me "Paul, she has just released you for your higher good." Yes indeed, we all need to get the concept into our collective heads, that every ending is in fact a brand new beginning.
So you just finished working for an organization that you had worked for, for a long time. However, at the same time you've started working for another company and your future really does look very promising as you begin to explore a totally new field. Yes indeed, it doesn't matter what phase of your life has come to an end, for the end is the beginning of another exciting phase of your life!
o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Four Hundred Students beging Training at Baha Mar, 225 of which are new students
Four Hundred Students beging Training at Baha Mar, 225 of which are new students

July 22, 2014

Leadership Development Institute Doubles Class Size...

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Sandals Foundation visits Urban Renewal for Mandela Day
Sandals Foundation visits Urban Renewal for Mandela Day

July 22, 2014

The children of Urban Renewal’s summer programme learned more about Nelson Mandela yesterday than they ever had. Some heard his name for the first time...

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Toastmasters Club 1600 installs 50th President

July 19, 2014

Police Commissioner urges men's club to create positive change...

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All-Bahamas Merit Scholar finishes first year at university with honors

July 16, 2014

Shannon Butler, who was arguably one of the brightest minds to graduate high school in 2013, has completed his one-year university foundation program in the British pre-med system and is now eager to commence his medical school studies in September.
"I'm really excited to start medical school so that I can finally begin what I love," said Shannon, the 2013 All-Bahamas Merit Scholar, who aspires to become a cardiothoracic surgeon.
Shannon, who is at home for summer break, finished his first year at St. Andrew's University in Scotland with grades that he said were satisfactory. Shannon took organic and biological chemistry, human biology, introduction to medicine, statistics, academic English and medical ethics in his second semester and finished the year with a lot of distinctions in individual classes, and the program in its entirety with honors. In the British system, everything is graded on a 20-point scale -- grades of 17 and above are classified as distinction, grades from 14-16.9 are upper second-class honors, 11 to 13 lower second and anything below an 11 a failure.
In September he will enter the six-year medical program that he says is perfect for people who know that they only want to study medicine.
"It avoids all of the extraneous requirements of other systems where you have to get a bachelor's degree and do lots of hours of research and community service, and you always try to have the top grade point average (GPA) and all of that stuff," said Shannon.
Even though the study habits he had adopted held up through his first year at university, he's anticipating that things will now have to change for him as he enters the rigorous program.
"With medical school you don't really have much coursework and many assessments -- it's really all about studying. I was actually reading the student handbook a few days ago and for my first year, in both semesters, I only have two assessments -- a mid-term that is 25 percent and my final exams which are 75 percent -- so basically this upcoming year it's going to be studying every single day."
After his first semester at university he had described the experience and adjustment as tough. He was homesick. His second semester was a different experience. He returned to the campus adjusted and with a solid group of friends. He experienced less homesickness and felt more at home in Scotland that he said resulted in an experience that was more enjoyable for him.
"I knew the ropes so things got a bit easier for me. I started out not liking the place that much, but now I'm actually excited to return to Scotland," said Shannon.
He's not only eager to return to his studies, but to the town he's grown to love which he said has a "charm" that he did not realize it had when he first went there.
"I always wanted to be in a big city, but now I basically realize that I like the small town. I get to see a lot of people -- almost everyone that I know...professors, students, all around the town and it [town] has a lot of history and a lot of beauty to it with the pier and the beach, and even the wilderness and farms outside of it."
During his first year he extended his education beyond the classroom. He made the first of what he expects to be many sojourns over the next six years into Europe by visiting The Netherlands. In the period between the end of his exams and his first-year graduation, he and his friends visited Amsterdam. They took the train to the countryside to look at small towns and to view the famous Dutch windmills.
At home, Shannon is relaxing in preparation for his return to Scotland. After his first week at home, he lent his services to his former high school teacher for two weeks for a chemistry course work preparation class. Shannon helped the tenth grade students with course work, writing lab reports and conducting experiments.
For the remainder of the summer break he plans to relax to prepare himself for the upcoming medical program.
"I just want to hopefully relax and leave the work experience, the research and the internships all for next summer and all the summers after that," he said.
"Actually, the school does not encourage trying to prepare yourself for medical school, because it says all that studying will come in time, and actually as soon as you arrive. I spoke with a teacher of mine who actively encourages taking breaks when breaks are given."
Shannon said his reading this summer will be for his enjoyment. He is currently engrossed in a fantasy book.
Shannon amassed a total of $146,000 in scholarships to help fund his education -- the All-Bahamas Merit Scholar, a four-year $140,000 scholarship. He was also named the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity's 2013 valedictorian and awarded a $6,000 scholarship.
He's also known for his focus. The former Queen's College student in high school distinguished himself with an impressive academic record, having achieved 10 Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) awards with nine A grades and one B grade. The results earned him the award for the best BGCSE results in the country; the best results from an independent school student and the highest award in mathematics.
Shannon's advice to graduates who are preparing to transition into university life is to ensure that they attend a school that they really like, and to ensure that they pick a course of study that they like.
"Just make sure that you're in a healthy environment and be prepared to buckle down and do your work, pull all-nighters and study as much as necessary to get the grades that you need. But also try to genuinely enjoy yourself and have a great time," said the former Q.C. head boy and valedictorian.

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Young men top Temple Christian School's 2014 graduating class

July 16, 2014

Temple Christian School's 2014 graduating class was reminded that to succeed, they would need to have a sense of personal direction.
"In order to have the results you desire in the future, you must commit yourselves to embracing the necessary attributes and skills that will keep you engaged like the magnetized needle in a compass that automatically swings to magnetic north," said Marcellus Taylor, the Ministry of Education's deputy director with responsibility for planning and development.
His words to the graduating student body came as the top awards given out during the ceremony were snagged by three young men -- Daniel Jagessar, Terrance Arnold and Cameron Johnson.
Jagessar, the head boy was named class Valedictorian and received the Principal's Award. He took home top awards for mathematics, English Language, physics, biology, chemistry, religious studies and Spanish and the second place prize for Graphical Communication. He also received the Most Outstanding Student Award for mathematics, the BTC General Manager's Award and a four-year scholarship from BEC to attend The College of The Bahamas because of his participation in the Technical Cadet Corps Programme.
Arnold, the deputy head boy captured the Salutatorian Award. He received first place prizes for graphical communication and physical education and second place prizes for mathematics and physics. He was also given the Spirit Award for his participation in soccer and track and field. Johnson graduated in third place. He obtained first place prizes in Literature and Art and Design and the second place prize for English Language. He received honorable mention from Savannah College of Art and Design for his comic book entered in the college's art competition.
Taylor told the graduates that employers are looking for candidates who stand out from the crowd and who are qualified for the job.
"Your compass for the future should point you in the direction of acquiring the college degree, and or training, that you will need to secure the career that you desire," he said. He also reminded the members of the graduating class that employers want to hire people who possess good work ethics and that punctuality, high attendance and good moral character are among the top criteria that capture the attention of employers.
Taylor further told the graduates that employers were interested in team players who exhibit flexibility and adaptability. He told the students to allow their compass for the future to point them in the direction to evolve into lifelong learners. He encouraged the graduates to commit to a future of following a compass that will guide them to ultimate satisfaction, which involves positive accomplishments.

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Student internship programs take off at Baha Mar

July 16, 2014

Bahamian college students have the opportunity to soar this summer as the eight-week Summer Dream Team Associate program, one of three coveted student internship programs at Baha Mar, got underway. The internship programs are geared towards students at various stages in their education.
The Junior Jet-Setter program for high school students started on July 7. The Jet-Setter program for recent college graduates will start on July 21. These internships provide the opportunity for students to explore careers in hospitality while experiencing the Baha Mar environment in diverse areas such as environmental planning and sustainability, creative arts, marketing and finance.
"These outstanding students are the future of the Bahamian hospitality industry. These internships at Baha Mar demonstrate the diversity of the industry and show the students that if they have the right attitude and an aptitude for service, they can have a career in hospitality regardless of their area of study," said Baha Mar Chief Operating Officer Paul V. Pusateri. "Together we can transform [The] Bahamas and create a better future for our country".
The summer programs will lay the foundation for Baha Mar's better-than-best service culture among potential employees. The Junior Jet-Setter program will run for two to three weeks at a time, teaching the high school students how to prepare for successful careers. The Jet-Setter and Summer Dream Team associate interns will teach more specific workplace skills.
The college students and recent graduates will learn skills such as time management, professionalism, and critical thinking in addition to function-specific skills such as guest services that will prepare them for future job opportunities with Baha Mar.
One of the most unique aspects of the internships will be the chance to learn service standards and global perspectives from representatives of the exclusive resort brands at Baha Mar -- Grand Hyatt, Rosewood, SLS and the centerpiece of the resort, the Baha Mar Casino & Hotel.
Candidates are hand-selected for each of the programs based on their performance in school, participation in extra-curricular activities and in-person interviews with Baha Mar Academy representatives.
The Junior Jet-Setter program selected only the top candidates from 350 applicants for the first session that started last week and competition for the college level programs was also healthy, as the internships could lead to potential job opportunities at Baha Mar.
High school students and recent college graduates will still have the chance to participate in upcoming Junior Jet-Setter and Jet-Setter programs that will begin in the coming weeks.
Applications for the Baha Mar Jet-Setter and Junior Jet-Setter programs are available at www.bahamar.com/careers/opportunities under the "Current Job Openings" tab.
o To learn more about internship programs and career opportunities at Baha Mar please follow Baha Mar Careers on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, or email careers@bahamar.com.

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Fear motivation or desire motivation

July 16, 2014

There are unfortunately a whole lot of people who are using fear motivation on both young people and indeed adults, without really fully understanding its destructive, negative impact on others. Let's face it, as I stated before on many occasions in these articles, we initially learn the behaviors we exhibit as children by observing those around us. So if they did things wrong, well then, it logically follows that we will continue to do it wrong until such time as we become aware that by and large fear motivation is indeed counterproductive.
I myself was indeed programmed in my youth with a whole lot of fear motivation by my parents, and in particular by my mother who always used it -- you better do this or else this will happen! I'm quite sure that everyone is indeed quite familiar with what I'm alluding to here today. So, having learnt all about fear motivation at a young age from my parents, I obviously continued to use it on everyone until thank God I became associated with Dr. Denis Waitley who was the author of many bestsellers dealing with human behavior, including "The Psychology of Winning'" "The Winner's Edge" and "Being Your Best" to name a few.
From my association with Dr. Waitley I facilitated his "Psychology of Winning" seminar around the globe for major corporations, I learnt firsthand so to speak about the absolute importance of using desire motivation in order to get good results from people both young and old. Dr. Waitley states quite clearly, that we should only use fear motivation when there's a possibility of danger. However, on all other occasions we should always use desire motivation if we wish to get excellent results from people.
In his bestseller "The Psychology of Winning" Dr. Waitley states the following: "We are always moving toward our current dominant thought". This is absolutely true. So, when we use fear motivation by saying to a child for example, you better not fail your exams, or if a manager or supervisor tells one of their employees not to mess up a certain task or else, well then that person is actually programming the child or adult to do exactly what they don't want them to do by placing the thought of failure in their mind, which they will then move toward.
So, always, always use desire motivation on people young and old if you want to really motivate them and thus get excellent results from their actions. Use phrases like "I know you'll do a great job," or "I have absolute faith in you to succeed" ... etc. This type of desire motivation is very effective. Try it and see for yourself. I guarantee you'll be glad you did!
o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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Student Internship Programs Take Off at Baha Mar:
Student Internship Programs Take Off at Baha Mar:

July 15, 2014

Best and Brightest Young Bahamians to Learn Teamwork and Service Culture at the Luxury Resort...

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Nottage hits back at Wilson over COB president search

July 15, 2014

THE head of the committee charged with finding the new president of the College of the Bahamas yesterday hit back at Franklyn Wilson, the college's Council Chairman and a major benefactor, over his comments as to who should be appointed...

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Monroe College to host Bahamian Leaders for Exploratory Agricultural Education Partnership
Monroe College to host Bahamian Leaders for Exploratory Agricultural Education Partnership

July 11, 2014

Monroe College, a national leader in urban and international education, today announced that it will host Godfrey Eneas...

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It's What They Have in Common-Nation's Top Performing Bank Sponsors Top Performing Junior Achievers
It's What They Have in Common-Nation's Top Performing Bank Sponsors Top Performing Junior Achievers

July 11, 2014

More than 25,000 young people have passed through the training grounds of Junior Achievement since the late 1970s...

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Baha Mar Partners with Best Buddies to offer Revolutionary Program:
Baha Mar Partners with Best Buddies to offer Revolutionary Program:

July 09, 2014

Teachers and Volunteers Trained at Leadership Development Institute to Work with Special Needs Students...

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