Education

A tour for now, a job for tomorrow
A tour for now, a job for tomorrow

March 05, 2015

THE first 50 Bahamian seafarer candidates seeking jobs onboard the Grand Celebration are on their way to becoming trained and qualified...

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Te'ja's mission

March 04, 2015

No matter the noise in the market, there are youth who want to make a difference in the community, and are doing just that. Case in point, Te'ja Munnings, 11, isn't just thinking about how many presents she can get for special occasions -- she's a young lady who is thinking about people who are battling deadly diseases and who are hoping that they will wake up everyday and have life.
For the last five months, the sixth grade St. Thomas More School student has been making and selling ribbons to raise funds to help find a cure and to assist the Cancer Society of The Bahamas and people suffering from cancer. Through her Ribbons For Life, Te'ja's mission is to bring awareness to children and young adults of the different cancers that affect people and to give back.
The St. Thomas More student learned how to make her ribbons with the help of a cousin, Erika Hamilton, with whom she had previously made bows. Hamilton helped Te'ja come up with the design for her cancer ribbon. Te'ja decided to make bows on an order basis, in favor of making the cancer ribbons to raise awareness of cancer after it hit close to home. Her friend's mother Blanche Cuffy was diagnosed with breast cancer.
"She [Cuffy] had to take off all two of her breasts, and one day I just woke up thinking that we're here wishing and hoping for Christmas and birthday gifts when they're hoping they can live," said Te'ja.
Te'ja's ribbons comprised of 11 of the 26 colors that are representative of cancers -- gold (childhood cancer), orange (Leukemia), lime green (Lymphoma), yellow (Sarcoma/bone cancer), purple (Pancreatic/Leomyosarcoma), periwinkle (esophageal cancer), teal (ovarian cancer), pink (breast cancer), navy (colon cancer), light blue (prostate cancer), and white (lung cancer), sell for $5 per ribbon.
Since January, Te'ja has donated $700 to the Cancer Society and cancer patient Zion Knowles. In some instances it was money the Cancer Society did not even know that the primary school student had donated. Her mother, Maranda Lightbourne, would drop off the money, or the money Te'ja raised from the sale of her ribbons would be donated through another cause like Paint the Lanes Pink in which she participated for two years.
"I just said to her [Te'ja] in January that she should let them [Cancer Society] know that it was her," said Lightbourne. "She didn't want to because she said she wasn't doing it for recognition. I took her [to the Cancer Society] to meet them and they told her it was a good thing. They told her they knew monies were coming in, but they didn't know from where," she said.
The Cancer Society of The Bahamas is using the image of Te'ja's cancer ribbon on their flyers for their upcoming 14th Annual Ball to be held under the theme "Colors of Hope" on Saturday, May 23. They have also extended an invitation to the youngster. She is eager to attend, but will have a scheduling conflict as it's on the same day as the Primary School Student of the Year awards. Te'ja is a nominee. Her mother says she does not know how it will get done, but has promised her daughter that she will do her best to get her to both events. Te'ja has even gotten Hamilton to make her a dress in the color scheme of her ribbon to wear to the ball.
Te'ja's mother and father, Clyde Munnings, have also lauded their daughter for what she is doing. Initially her mother said she had been shocked when Te'ja came up with the cancer ribbons idea.
"To be honest, I was like Te'ja ... seriously! Who do you even know with cancer? And she was like 'Yes ma'am' and I was like okay, I'm with you. Let me know what I have to do. Her first thing was 'Take me to the fabric store,' and I was like okay."
Lightbourne said she is proud of her daughter and encourages her in all things, but said she finds that sometimes Te'ja encourages her.
Over the course of the last two months, Lightbourne estimates that Te'ja has spent between $500 and $600 on material to make her cancer ribbons. And it was all done with lunch money the youngster had saved since first grade.
The St. Thomas More student said it takes her approximately five minutes to make one ribbon, and she makes time each evening to make quite a few each evening, after an already packed day that includes school, club meetings for Junior Achievement, Brownies, choir practice, swimming and homework.
"In the beginning she would give the entire proceeds back, and she started off buying stuff for the children's home, and then she went into making hair bows. Last year she decided she didn't want to make the hair bows or make it a priority. She does it on an order basis. She wanted to focus on giving back to just the Cancer Society and I was like okay," said Lightbourne.
While Te'ja is becoming known for her philanthropy, she's still a youngster who is in the formative years of her life who knows that getting a good education is important. She's an "A" grade student at St. Thomas More. On a 100 percent scale, she is a 98.
"Even though I play with my friends, I don't let them distract me in class or anything. I pay attention," said the student whose favorite subject is math.
Te'ja who will attend Queen's College (QC) in the fall said she wants to maintain a 4.00 grade point average in high school and maintain positive friendships going forward.
The youngster's philanthropy isn't new to her mother. She said she recognized that her daughter had compassion for others since she was four years old.
"She has a sister who is always with us, and if there is only one pack of cookies or one chip in the house, Te'ja would not eat it. The other day there was just enough milk in the house to make probably one bowl of cereal, Te'ja refused to use it because she was like someone else may want to. She would never eat the last of whatever's in the house, and I'm like wow," said Lightbourne.
She said Te'ja's ability to think about others before herself also came to light in Te'ja's school choice for secondary education. She said her daughter had a heart set on a private school in the east for most of her life, but in the final analysis, decided on QC as it offered other extra classes that she wanted to take and because of its proximity to her mother's job which meant she would not have to rush to pick her up. She told her mother that attending QC would save her time.
Lightbourne also described her daughter as a go-getter, who is a positive person and who always encourages her peers to do well.
As Te'ja prepares for the final few months of her primary years, she will continue to make her cancer ribbons which have become popular at home, but there are two people that she has dreams of being able to present ribbons to -- United States President Barack Obama and Pope Francis.
And the youngster who came up with the name Ribbons for Life without help said the name says it all -- and that it is her hope that she can keep it going for life.

Te'ja Munning's cancer ribbon colors
Gold -- childhood
Orange -- Leukemia
Lime green -- Lymphoma
Yellow -- Bone cancer
Purple -- Pancreatic
Periwinkle -- Stomach
Teal -- Ovarian
Pink -- Breast
Navy -- Colon
Light blue -- Prostate
White -- Lung

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Public school senior students engaged in marine stewardship

March 04, 2015

Public senior school students are being engaged in marine stewardship and learning to care for beaches and coral reefs, in a three-year conservation program by Young Marine Explorers (YME).
During the program students from grades 10 through 12 participate in weekly after-school classes and Saturday ocean classroom field trips. The curriculum is mapped over the Ministry of Education's high school curriculum to reinforce what students are learning in biology, geography, math and language arts.
YME Executive Director Nikita Shiel-Rolle who spoke at the inaugural conference of the Citizen Science Association in San Jose, California, on advancing science through communication, coordination and education, launched the YME's newest program.
She anticipates that students in the YME Conservation Program will perform higher on their BGCSE's, express a value for volunteerism, have a working knowledge of Bahamian laws and regulations, and gain professional skills for the workforce, however not without community and corporate support.
"The system has been tested. It works. The activities and fieldwork we have outlined for the students are designed to challenge them and increase their critical thinking and analytical skills along with their overall knowledgeability. These traits are necessary to excel in the local curricula," said Shiel-Rolle. "We look forward to engaging kids in volunteerism and cultivating a love for the environment, but we need first to develop partnerships with companies and organizations who are prepared to invest in Bahamian youth."
YME, founded in 2008, is a Bahamian non-profit organization with the vision to inspire and equip a generation of youth with the passion and skills required to create a sustainable future for The Bahamas. The YME program aims to educate and inspire youth to become the leaders needed to address the social, economic and environmental challenges of The Bahamas through initiatives like the YME Conservation Program which offers after-school and Saturday activities on the oceans, biodiversity, and stewardship of Bahamas' natural resources.
In order for the YME program to reach its goal of 10 percent of government senior school students they estimate is the critical minimum to make a measurable impact, Shiel-Rolle said they needed to enroll 4,000 students in the program. Starting in the islands they already operate in, and expanding in stages, she said they can achieve their goal in several years, but that it would require investment from corporate partnerships in the coming months to make the program available for more students.
Shiel-Rolle spoke at Citizen Science, a pre-conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting a global science gathering that brought together scientists, engineers, policymakers, educators and journalists to discuss recent developments in science and technology. At Citizen Science, participants exchange ideas and experiences on how to develop a world where people understand, value and participate in science.

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Celebrating teaching excellence

March 04, 2015

Out of a 45-person candidate list, one person will rise to the top and claim the Department of Education National Teacher of the Year (NTOY) 2015-2017, and walk away with a prize package that includes $7,000, a weekend stay for two at a local resort, an all-expenses paid trip to an international education conference and a plaque.
In selecting the winner, the judging panel takes into account the educator's extracurricular activity (10 percent), professional development (10 percent) contributions to education (15 percent), general student progress (10 percent), personal philosophy (five percent), teaching proficiency (30 percent), interview (10 percent), and video presentation (10 percent).
The NTOY which is being held under the theme "Celebrating Quality Teachers: Recognizing Pathways of Excellence" will be named on March 28 at the Atlantis Theater.
The first runner-up will receive $3,000 and a plaque; the second runner-up will receive $2,000 and a plaque; the third runner-up will receive $1,000 and a plaque; district finalists receive a $1,000 stipend towards attending an international conference.
Events leading up to the finale include a church service on Wednesday, March 25; Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT) reception on Thursday, March 26 and a boat cruise on Friday, March 27.
NTOY was introduced in 1988 by the Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT) to recognize excellent teachers in the public school system throughout The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Ten years after it began, the BUT joined forces with the Ministry of Education for the award. The result was the NTOY award exercise that is organized in school districts and includes primary, all age, secondary and special schools.
The objectives of the NTOY award are to highlight the significant role of teachers in nation building; to honor and reward teachers for their outstanding contributions in the field of education; to encourage and motivate teachers to perform at high standards; to provide teachers with the opportunity to showcase and share their teaching talents and to introduce outstanding teachers to the wider community.

Department of Education National Teacher of the Year (NTOY) 2015-2017 candidates
Abaco
Nadia McDermott, Fox Town Primary (Generalist)
Magdalene Mills, Abaco Central High (Social Studies)

Eleuthera
Sharon Scott, Central, Eleuthera High (Biology/Chemistry)
Lenae Brown, Preston Albury High (Mathematics)
Angirece Major, Harbour Island All Age (History/Geography/Civics)

Exuma and Ragged Island
Keniqua Burrows, L.N. Coakley ( Biology/Chemistry)

Grand Bahama (East)
Deanna North, Freeport Primary (Generalist)
Arnold Martin, Jack Hayward Junior High (Social Studies)
Stephanie Higgs, Jack Hayward High (Physical Education)

Grand Bahama (West)
Danicia Dean-Campbell, Sister Mary Patricia Russell Jr. (Language Arts/Literature)
Levette Smith, Bartlett Hill Primary (Generalist)
Melinda Green, Hugh Campbell Primary (Generalist)
Canovia Missick-Ferguson, St. George's High (Health Science)

MICAL
Dominique Moxey, Crookes Island High (Religious Studies)
Sophie Lightbourne, Inagua All Age (Spanish)

North and Central Andros & The Berry Islands
Marlene Brenwell, R.N. Gomez All Age (Generalist)

New Providence
Northeastern
Dawn Whylly, Centreville Primary School (Generalist)
Shevron Thomas, Doris Johnson Senior High (English Language/Literature)
Trivea Skippings-Culmer, L.W. Young Junior (English Language/Literature)
Denise Francis, Thelma Gibson (Generalist)
Tiffany Burell-Roberts, Uriah McPhee Primary (Generalist)

Northwestern
Tammy Rolle, Albury Sayle Primary School (Generalist)
Paul Adderley, C.C. Sweeting Senior (Hospitality and Tourism Studies)
Tarinda Thompson-Rolle, C.R. Walker Senior (Family Life Health Education)
Theresa Turnquest, H.O. Nash Junior (Religious Studies)
Alicia Davis, Oakes Field Primary (Generalist)
Colette Hanna, Stephen Dillet Primary (Generalist)
Daphne Roberts, T.A. Thompson (Computer Studies)
Jillian Pinder, T.G. Glover Primary (Generalist)

Southeastern
Tamika Bodie, C.V. Bethel Senior (History/Civics)
Audra Tynes, R.M. Bailey Senior (English Language/Literature)
Ramona Wells, C.H. Reeves Junior (Business Studies)
Sherado Gibson, Cleveland Eneas Primary (Generalist)
Nikera Culmer, E.P. Roberts Primary (Generalist)

Southwestern
Bennique Brown, S.C. McPherson Jr. (Reading)
Latoya Williams Brown, Sadie Curtis Primary (Generalist)
Agatha Stuart-Francis, A.F. Adderley (Social Studies)
Raquel Minnis, Adelaide Primary (Generalist)
Lakell Johnson, Anatol Rodgers High (English Language)
Lorna Lightbourne, Carmichael Primary (Generalist)
Lawrenique Bowles, C.W. Sawyer Primary (Generalist)
Xanthe Minnis, Garvin Tynes Primary (Generalist)
Samantha Wilson, Gerald Cash Primary (Generalist)
Yonell Justillien, Government High, (Performing Arts)
Tara Deveaux, Yellow Elder Primary (Generalist)

Past National Teacher
of the Year results
2012-2014 -- Nadia Smith, C.C. Sweeting Senior School
2010-2012 -- Africa Karamo-Miller
2008-2010 -- Marcia Musgrove
2006-2008 -- Tamika Cartwright
2004-2006 -- Yorick Sands
2002-2004 -- Roderick Rolle
2001-2002 -- Stacy Stubbs
2000-2001 -- Joan Knowles
1999-2000 -- Barbara Dorsett
1998-1999 -- Kenneth Romer

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Private pilot flight training course launched at BTVI

March 04, 2015

Beach Aviation's Bahamas Aviation Academy and the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI) have launched a comprehensive Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Private Pilot Flight Training course in The Bahamas.
FAA Private Pilot Theory is the initial 15-week course, scheduled to begin on April 27. Its subject matter will include, but is not limited to air law, astronomy and navigation, physics, meteorology, geography, technical English and mathematics.
Following the theory, students will focus on the flight aspect of the program. While the theory and tests will take place at BTVI, the practical will be held at Beach Aviation in Florida with a required minimum flight time of 40 hours.
For the fall 2015 semester, The Bahamas Aviation Academy proposes to offer the Private Pilot Theory along with the FAA Instrument Pilot Theory. In the spring 2016 semester the two courses would be offered for a second time in addition to the FAA Commercial Pilot and Flight Crew Theory.
Upon satisfactorily completing the course, students will receive an endorsement from an authorized instructor to take the FAA Private Pilot Airplane Knowledge Test. Additionally, they would have achieved a Student Pilot Certificate and be a Flight Cadet with Beach Aviation.
BTVI in its mission to provide opportunities that enable individuals to be globally competitive and economically independent recognized the benefit of partnering with Beach Aviation to train the next generation of private and commercial pilots in The Bahamas. The historic partnership will provide students the opportunity to be trained in a myriad of FAA approved courses while remaining in Nassau.
Beach Aviation partner, Dr. Kenneth Romer, said the academy would prove to be an asset to The Bahamas as it establishes itself as a regional leader by having a full-motion Redbird simulator available to students for logging flight time.
"The partnership between Beach Aviation and BTVI ensures an opportunity for Bahamians and members of the Caribbean community to train for a career in a high demand and high-paying field in The Bahamas. The students will also benefit by learning from professional pilots and current jet captains who share real-world knowledge and experiences with them," said Dr. Romer.
Beach Aviation's four senior captains, who are professional pilots and international jet captains, alone have 75,000 hours of flight and instruction. The company's partners include Bahamians Captain Fredrick McPhee and Dr. Romer along with Captain Charles Brady and Floridian House of Representative and retired judge, Dr. James R. Eddy.
BTVI's Manager and Consultant, Dr. Iva Dahl was pleased that the institution would partner with Beach Aviation to make The Bahamas Aviation Academy a success.
"The agreement certainly allows for locals to pursue a career in the aviation industry with the theoretical phase being done right at home. It's a viable solution for people to discover their path to becoming private and commercial pilots, and BTVI is proud to play a role in making those dreams a reality," said Dr. Dahl.
"The premise is that the students will begin to naturally progress," said Dr. Romer.
Beach Aviation, headquartered in Boca Raton, Florida, was formed in 2010. It has additional locations in West Palm Beach at Palm Beach International Airport; Tampa, Florida at St. Petersburg International Airport and in Montpellier, France.
As part of an extended global campus, the Beach Aviation Bahamas campus seeks to attract students from throughout The Bahamas, the Caribbean, the United States of America, Latin America, France and Italy.

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It's not their fault

March 04, 2015

There are a whole lot of misguided people who appear to spend their whole life blaming their shortcomings and failures on either circumstances beyond their control, or others. That's right, there are a whole slew of people who seem to be unable to accept responsibility for their actions, especially when they fail miserably in some area of their life, for example, when a marriage or personal relationship fails, most will embark on a long litany of their ex-partner's or ex-spouse's faults without ever daring to admit, that perhaps they also contributed in some way to the demise of the relationship.
Or when someone fails in business, they will blame the economy, their bad employees, or the inferior quality of the products that the various manufacturers supplied them with, etc., etc. That's right, when a whole lot of people fail in any aspect of their life, they immediately start to look for a scapegoat, someone or something to blame their failure on. Their constant chant is that "It's not their fault" that they failed.
My friend, let me set you straight once and for all -- if you failed at something, it's your fault. And until you look in the mirror, figuratively speaking, and thus fully accept responsibility for your failure, there's no way for you to correct your failures, stop making mistakes and thus finally learn the lessons to be learned by the failure, eventually moving on to success city. My friend, in a nutshell, if you failed, it's not their fault -- it's yours! So own up to it, change the way in which you operate and thus move on to great success.
Yes my friend, until we learn to admit our mistakes, there really is no way in which to move on with our life, and thus having learnt valuable lessons from our mistakes, finally make it. As I have stated many times before in these articles, making mistakes and thus failing from time to time is all a part of the growth process of life. So stop blaming your failures on others, for as today's title states it simply and succinctly it's not their fault whomever they are. It's yours! So take full responsibility for your life, for the successes and the failures, for it's the only way to finally grow, mature and continue to succeed.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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New School Registration Policy
New School Registration Policy

March 03, 2015

To help with the registration and documentation of students, please be advised that commencing in the academic year 2015/2016, all compulsory school aged students (ages five to 16 years), will be required to possess either...

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Young Marine Explorers Announces Launch of New Conversation Program at Inaugral Program at Inaugral Citizen Science Conference in San Jose California
Young Marine Explorers Announces Launch of New Conversation Program at Inaugral Program at Inaugral Citizen Science Conference in San Jose California

March 03, 2015

Nikita Shiel-Rolle, the Executive Director of Young Marine Explorerís (YME) was an invited speaker at the inaugural conference of the Citizen Science Association in San Jose, California late last month, speaking to over 600 people from 25 countries on advancing science through communication, coordination and education...

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Task Force To Host Free Seminar

March 03, 2015

As filing and payment for quarterly filers approaches, the Value Added Tax (VAT) Private
Sector Education Task Force has decided to host a few VAT Seminar on Filing and Payment of
Returns...

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COB students join Bahamas National Culinary Team
COB students join Bahamas National Culinary Team

March 02, 2015

It was a throw-down the likes of which left mouths watering and palates yearning to be satisfied. Culinary students at The College of The Bahamasí Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute (CHMI)...

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Scotiabank Sponsors High School Track Field Championships
Scotiabank Sponsors High School Track & Field Championships

March 02, 2015

Scotiabank is proud to announce its sponsorship of the National High School Track & Field Championships scheduled for March 4th through 7th at the national stadium. The bank officially confirmed its partnership with the National Sports Authority of The Bahamas as a Co-Title Sponsor...

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Education Minister announces Plans to Improve Education Sector
Education Minister announces Plans to Improve Education Sector

March 02, 2015

Education, Science and Technology Minister the Hon. Jerome Fitzgerald outlined new intervention strategies that the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology...

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Int'l Publication Chronicles Highlights of COB's 40-Year History

March 02, 2015

A respected research publication that chronicles the evolution of the nationís premier tertiary education institution has been released, tracing the historical highlights of The College of The Bahamas...

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Templeton World Charity Foundation Officials Tour Pompey Museum

February 27, 2015

This month, officials from Templeton World Charity Foundation toured the Wade in the Water: the Peter Mowell, the Last Slave Ship in The Bahamas exhibition at the newly restored Pompey Museum...

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Government to Open Public Service College
Government to Open Public Service College

February 26, 2015

The Government is about to establish a Public Service College in a move to further equip Public Servants with the tools to move the country forward...

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The Providence School honors star pupils

February 25, 2015

Honor roll and star students at The Providence School were recognized in a unique way -- they were showcased during the school's student body's production of "Sunrise@Providence," their version of The Counsellors Ltd. show "Bahamas@Sunrise".
Eighteen members of the school's student body from first through fourth grade recorded grade point averages (GPA) higher than 3.00 through the Christmas term. Star students who not only excelled academically, but displayed good character traits were also honored.
"The students are doing very well and I'm proud of them," said The Providence School's Head of School Shacantila Hall-Briggs of the student academic performance at one of the country's newest institutions.
During the "Sunrise@Providence" production that was recorded and played for parents, the students acted as news anchors and reporters and delivered the news about stories that fell under their beat and shot at different locations around the school located on the Tonique Williams-Darling Highway.
The head of school said producing the show helped the students with their
production skills and their ability to deliver in front of a crowd.
"We were trying for the kids to not just memorize everything. We wanted to showcase their incredible reading skills, because we did have some kids that came to us as non-readers and really reading below level. And nothing was watered down for them. We allowed them to write and edit, and they were able to do that. And they had to research their sections, so there was a Mandarin reporter, a Spanish reporter, someone who reported on language, right on down to sports. And we tried to incorporate as much of the subject learning in it so the children could then deliver it," said Hall-Briggs.
From concept through to the final product, the students did it all, including producing commercials and onsite reporting.
"They literally did everything. The students depicted the adult members from Hall-Briggs herself to their teachers. There was no adult present in the whole production. And then we incorporated our honor roll and star students into it," she said.
The concept for the production came to the students after a penmanship class, and their reporter's club wanting to do a term in review and speak to what was to come with the start of the 2015 semester. Hall-Briggs encouraged the students to do the show this year during which the outstanding students could be recognized.
With five weeks to the Easter break, the head of school said she and her staff would be working hard with the student to ensure that all of their students are named to the honor roll.
The Providence School has begun to accept applications for the new school year. They will also hold open houses on Saturday, February 28 and Saturday, March 28 from 10 a.m. to 12-noon. The school can also be called for appointments for registration at 698-6701/2.

The Providence School Honor Roll students through the Christmas term

K5
Denika Rolle -- 4.00

Grade 1
Erin McPhee -- 3.67
Nathan Moxey -- 4.00
Perez Lightbourne -- 3.33
Ryjha Ward -- 3.77
Takiha Rolle -- 3.55
Tamouya Joseph -- 3.11
Jaden Clarke -- 3.22

Grade 2
Jonathan Miller -- 3.78
Kaizer Briggs -- 4.00
Kamari Lockhart -- 3.89

Grade 3
Dymonde Lundy -- 3.30
Nasir Williams -- 3.30

Grade 4
Maquel Connolly -- 3.45
Selia Duncombe -- 3.10
Jaden Duncombe
Dina Poitier -- 3.09
Rycheed Ward -- 3.43

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Four awarded Tara Xavier Hepburn Foundation scholarships

February 25, 2015

Four new students have been awarded the Tara Xavier Foundation Scholarship for the 2014-2017 school years bringing the number of scholarship recipients up to 26 since the inception of the scholarship program in 2007.
Receiving scholarships were former T.A. Thompson Junior School student Ralph Sealy, former C.H. Reeves Junior School student Shania Lewis, former H.O. Nash Junior School student Nastacia Turnquest and Monique Chandler of the TARA Project and St. John's College.
The four new recipients will all matriculate at St. John's College where they will join -- twelfth grade students Edwin Greenslade, Amanda Fowler and Jewel Sturrup; eleventh grade students Quentinn Moreice Forbes and Eleanore Simmons.
TARA Scholars enrolled at St. Anne's School include eleventh grade students Jeffon Stubbs and Delmonica Brown.
The Tara Xavier Hepburn Foundation scholarship which is for three years, tenth through twelfth grades, covers full tuition and the cost of books for recipients at the cost of approximately $5,000 per year per student.
The scholarship is open to graduates of government junior schools and students of St. John's College and St. Anne's School who have successfully completed grade nine, and tenable at St. John's College and St. Anne's School.
In order to be considered for a scholarship, applicants must be nominated by their school, attain at least a 3.00 grade point average, have demonstrated leadership ability and/or community involvement; be of good moral character and successfully pass a minimum of five BJC subjects which must include English and Mathematics with a grade of "C" or better. Applicants also may be required to attend an interview.
The Tara Xavier Hepburn Foundation was launched on December 29, 2006 to celebrate the life of Hepburn, an exceptional young Bahamian who died at the age of 30 while studying law, after having completed a psychology degree. Out of pain and grief and trying to cope with the loss, Hepburn's family decided to keep Tara's memory alive through scholarship for students in high school.
The Foundation is funded largely through donation.

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Clean sports takes center stage

February 25, 2015

A new, national art and essay competition demonstrated students' deep appreciation and understanding of the concept of clean sports.
Approximately 59 entries from 13 schools vied for a top spot in the Bahamas Anti-Doping Commission (BADC) inaugural contest with top spots won by Queen's College student Ari Brathwaite (essay senior); St. Anne's School student Bernique Pople (essay junior) and St. Francis de Sales' Brad Cooper (essay elementary).
With one photo entry entered into the competition, Lyford Cay International School's Caterina Leam was assured of the win in the elementary division.
In the art division of the competition, the top awards were carted off by St. George's High School student Thaddia Simms (art senior); St. John's College's Amy Burrows (art junior) and Queens College's Caldon Whyms (art elementary).
The award ceremony was held at the National Art Gallery Friday evening.
In the essay competition, New Providence dominated with 19 entries. Another eight essays came from Grand Bahama and one from Abaco.
Grand Bahama monopolized the art contest with 27 entries, completely overshadowing the three entries that came from New Providence.
There was only one entry in the photography category.
First, second and third place winners were declared at the elementary (five to 10-years old), junior (11 to 13) and senior (14 to 18) levels.
"We wanted to stimulate them to exercise their creative process in interpreting the concept of clean sports," said Roscow Davies, the BADC's member responsible for education and training.
Established in 2009, by an act of Parliament, the BADC works to prevent cheating and doping in all sports in The Bahamas.
"In a world where many athletes take performance enhancing substances to gain an unfair advantage over others ... we want young people to understand this whole sense of competing fairly," said Davies.
He called the collective response from the schools in New Providence and Grand Bahama "encouraging."
For BADC Chairman, Dr. Jerome Lightbourne, education equals prevention. Education, he said, should start at a very young age.
"We live in a world where people try to do whatever they can to come first," said Dr. Lightbourne.
"We as parents and coaches put a sense of added performance in our children and athletes by enticing them to take extra vitamins and supplements. That's actually the beginning because it instills in these children and these athletes' minds at a very young age that they need to take something else to win."
Fortunately, athletes from The Bahamas have never tested positive on an international level, although there have been some positive doping results locally.
Speaking to the caliber of work submitted, BADC member and Olympian, Pauline Davis-Thompson said "the future looks very bright."
"We have some very talented young people in this country," she said. "Continue to hone your craft."
The BADC intends to host a second awards ceremony in Grand Bahama to honor the winners hailing from the nation's second city.

Winners' circle
Essay Elementary
1st place Brad Cooper Jr. (St. Francis de Sales)
2nd place Michael Massey (Lyford Cay International School)
3rd place Sierra Blair (Kingsway Academy)

Essay Junior
1st place Bernique Pople (St. Anne's School)
2nd place Angel Knowles (Temple Christian High School)
3rd place Kristaleah Hall (Sunland Baptist Academy)

Essay Senior
1st place Ari Brathwaite (Queen's College)
2nd place Lauryn Daxon (Queen's College)
3rd place Latario Smith (Temple Christian High School)

Photo Elementary
1st place Caterina Leam
(Lyford Cay International School)

Art Elementary
1st place Caldon Whyms (Queen's College),
2nd place Leander Newton (Sunland Baptist Academy)

Art Junior
1st place Amy Burrows (St. John's College)
2nd place Jaynell Rahming (St. John's College)
3rd Alyssa Turnquest (Mary Star Catholic Academy)

Art Senior
1st place Thaddia Simms (St. George's High School)
2nd place Aaron Minnis (St. George's High School)
3rd place Joshua Burrows (St. George's High School)
Honorable Mention: Franklyn Deveaux (St. George's High School)

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The joy of helping others

February 25, 2015

There's no doubt about it, there is absolute truth contained in the title of today's article "The joy of helping others" -- it's very real. Yes it is. Let me give you a couple of examples from my own life. Many years ago, I was introduced to W. Clement Stone at a seminar in Chicago and got a couple of his books, which I read enthusiastically from cover to cover. He concentrated a lot of effort at that time in assisting inmates at penal institutions in the United States (U.S.) to be rehabilitated so that they could return to society and once again become productive members of the community. This awakened a burning desire within me to do likewise in The Bahamas.
So when I returned to Nassau from Chicago, I immediately contacted the local penal institution administrator and offered to facilitate motivational seminars for inmates who were about to be released from prison in the next three to six months. Each Saturday I would go to the prison and conduct seminars from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. The seminars were very effective, and many years later I got a letter from one of these former inmates who is now a very successful businessman in the U.S. stating that it was what I had taught him in prison which contributed greatly to the successful businessman he had become. Believe me, this letter, which I treasure greatly brought tears to my eyes.
Here's another example: A few years ago someone attended an open seminar I facilitated in Nassau who was blind. I noticed something special in him and mentored him for quite some time. I later leaned that he was blind as the result of being shot during a failed attempt to rob a bank. Today, this person has become a really great motivational speaker who is mentoring troubled youth to endeavor to make sure that they don't get involved in crime like he did many years ago.
His first book "The Fight of My Life is Wrapped up in My Father Book 1" has just been published and is available through Amazon.com. In the introduction to the book, he mentions the fact that he's grateful to me for my mentoring. His name is Drexel Deal. I highly recommend his book, particularly for troubled youth.
Yes my friend, there's no doubt about it, the joy of helping others is very real. Believe me for I receive this joy every day of my life as I inspire and motivate people through this article and through The Reilly Institute website which can be accessed at www.dpaulreilly.com.
Now my friend, I want you to experience the joy of helping others. So today's the day for you to think deeply about how exactly you can assist others, the less fortunate in your community in some constructive way. Believe me, you most definitely will not regret it, and neither will the people whom you help.

o Think about it!
Visit my website at: www.dpaulreilly.com.
Listen to "Time to Think" the radio program on STAR 106.5 FM at 8:55 a.m. & 6:20 p.m.

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ZAMAR Fuels New Opportunities For Country with Certification

February 23, 2015

Move set to boost confidence in local expertise as International Clients demand more...

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