Nassau Guardian Stories

Agreement signed for management of national stadium

May 22, 2015

Over the past several years, The Bahamas has hosted some of the largest sporting and entertainment events in the region, and in an effort to further establish the country as a world class sports and entertainment brand, The Bahamas government has teamed up with Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG), one of the top marketing firms in the world, to help manage and market the recently renovated Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium.
At a press conference held at the Office of the Prime Minister yesterday, both Prime Minister Perry Christie and AEG representative Charles Steadman were on hand for the signing of the contract, which allows the firm to market the stadium as a sports and entertainment venue to the rest of the world. Also on hand for the signing was Don Perry from the law firm of Joel Katz out of Atlanta, Georgia; Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Dr. Daniel Johnson and Minister of State for Finance Michael Halkitis.
In terms of the benefits of the partnership, Johnson said this is exactly what The Bahamas needs to take the next step in becoming one of the top venues in the region. He said that AEG brings the perfect blend of marketing, funding and training to the equation.
"Just like we did with the IAAF, the best in the world at athletics, we're now going to partner with the best company in the world, in terms of management of stadiums, content and consistency," he said. "This is consistent with the prime minister's vision of having local Bahamian teams sit beside some of the best in the world and see how we perform. We are at last going to enter into the world of global sponsorship, which we know will drive the consistency of our brand, but also assist in maintaining the product we have now."
AEG facilities, is a stand-alone division of AEG that owns, operates and consults with more than 100 of the industry's preeminent venues worldwide. Steadman said that he is eager for the chance to be involved with The Bahamas, and expects the partnership to strengthen.
"On behalf of the 27,000 worldwide employees of AEG, it is a tremendous honor and privilege to represent them all here today," he said. "We have a global brand and a global reach that we hope to combine with the already world class destination that is The Bahamas, and the opportunity to create and expand on the great content that has already taken place here. Whether it's cultural, live music, or sports, our job is to work on behalf and execute the vision of the prime minister and the ministers that have chosen us.
"It has been a very long process. We began discussions about this in The Bahamas almost two years ago, but as they say, all great things are worth waiting for."
Prime Minister Christie added that he was more than ecstatic to welcome AEG to the country and that he is anxious to see the impact that it will have on the country's global appeal.
"When we had the CARICOM Prime Ministers' conference here in The Bahamas, we had commissioned the former prime minister of Jamaica, P.J. Patterson, to engage in a study and to report to other Caribbean prime ministers at the conference on the impact of culture and sports as an industry," he said. "In his paper, he demonstrated to us, that cultural industries amount to a multi-billion dollar enterprise world wide. When you look at the athletes and music of Jamaica, you can see where a Caribbean country has maximized a return on creating athletic, sporting and cultural excellence.
"In The Bahamas, we began our journey by expanding Junkanoo into Junkanoo Carnival, and we found it was received in an extraordinary way by the Bahamian people and others who came in for it. The Ministry of Tourism articulated a vision for sports tourism, and so AEG tells me it is important for the sports authority, musicians' union, aspiring musicians and sporting personalities to know we are establishing a platform, on which they can build."
AEG, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Anschutz Company, owns, controls or is affiliated with a collection of companies including premier facilities such as the STAPLES Center, Sprint Center, Citizen's Bank Arena and Oracle Arena.

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Leno Corporate Services partners with Barracuda Swim Club

May 22, 2015

The Leno/Barracuda Invitational Swim Meet is scheduled for this Friday, May 22 and Saturday, May 23 at the Betty Kelly-Kenning Aquatic Center.
Leno Corporate Services Limited has again partnered with the Barracuda Swim Club to host the 3rd Annual Leno Corporate/Barracuda Invitational Swim Meet. Leno Corporate Services is a Bahamian owned and operated investment company which offers a broad range of financial services.
"We at Leno are thrilled to continue to invest in swimming, and the youth of The Bahamas, as they strive for success" said Tricetta Small, portfolio manager at Leno Corporate Services.
Dion Gibson, president of Barracuda Swim Club thanked Leno for supporting the club and the sport of swimming and noted that the club values this successful partnership.
"This meet gives the swimmers a chance to achieve qualifying or personal best times for the upcoming 2015 RBC Bahamas Nationals Swimming Championships slated for the end of June" said Gibson.
The Barracuda Swim Club is a non-profit, parent-run organization dedicated to building the youth of our nation through swimming.
Leno/Barracuda Invitational Swim Meet began at 6 p.m. Friday and continues today at 9 a.m. at the Betty Kelly-Kenning Center. The public is invited to come out, support and experience the excitement of a swim meet.

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CAFL elections fast approaching

May 22, 2015

The Commonwealth American Football League (CAFL) will be holding elections in Freeport on Saturday, May 23 and in New Providence on Wednesday, May 27 and on Saturday, May 30, 2015.
The venues are as follows: in Freeport, voting will be held at the YMCA, located on East Settler's Way from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m.
In New Providence, voting will be held at The Crab House, located on Collins Ave and Seventh Terrace, Centerville on May 27 from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m., and again in New Providence at The Crab House on May 30 from 9:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.
The offices being contested are president and treasurer.
The nominees for president are Antonio Maycock and Melvin Ferguson.
The nominees for treasurer are Carl Campbell and Rick Barry. The offices of vice-president, secretary and public relations officer have already been filled respectively by Leander Davis, Deborah Saunders and Shane Albury.
All eligible voting members are asked to bring a valid driver's license or valid passport for identification.

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Jonquel Jones, the goodwill sports ambassador, part 1

May 22, 2015

Jonquel Jones has an engaging smile, the youthful look of a 15-year-old, but the demeanor of a mature goodwill sports ambassador for The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
She is also tall, standing 6-5, actually 21 years old and happens to be an outstanding basketball player, well on the way to a status no other Bahamian female player as ever achieved. A junior at George Washington University, Jones is nipping at the heels of Waltiea Rolle, the Bahamian professional female basketball player with the top rating thus far.
Rolle has played in Europe and the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). She is presently still pursuing her professional career in the United States. Jones is set however to move ahead of Rolle, and set the standard for female basketball in The Bahamas.
Along with chief mentor Coach Gladstone "Moon" McPhee, Jones paid me a visit recently. I remarked on her slim physique that belies her toughness on the basketball court.
"Yes, I'm slim but I'm pushing the weights and getting stronger. I'm feeling it," said a very much at ease Jones.
Questioned about the physicality of the sport she loves dearly, Jones smiled with the clear indication that on court, for her, it's business as usual.
"Yes opposing players like to bang, especially those with more size than I have, but it's never a problem for me. I just do what I have to do. I spend a lot of time working out and I'm always ready when the game is being played. I can handle those battles under the basket," she said confidently.
This year, Jonquel was very successful.
Indeed, although she scored a leading 21 points, and her George Washington University Colonials bowed out in the first round of the Spokane Region National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Women's Championships, Jones could look back on the 2014-2015 season with great personal pride.
She had one of those seasons that distinguish the great players from the just good ones. Her statistics were quite noteworthy. Jones started 30 games and had a points average of 15.7; she played an average of 26.8 minutes per game; registered a field goal shooting percentage of 47.8; shot 66.4 from the free throw line; and averaged 12.5 rebounds a game. It's an excellent stat line, but her performance in reality dwarfed her game numbers. She anchored the colonials on offense and defense.
As a result, she was the Atlantic 10 Conference Player and Defensive Player of the Year. The double awards truly indicated her strong presence on court this past season for George Washington. Jones was also an All-Star selection in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC); the Wisconsin Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) Honorable Mention All-American; Associated Press (AP) Honorable Mention All-American; and of course the Colonials MVP.
With that resume, why didn't the junior go into the draft?
"I didn't opt for the draft because my education is a priority. Coach (Moon) always told me that I must make sure and get my education. I'm comfortable with the decision. I have goals for next year. I want to have a quality season again but most of all, I want the team to advance in the NCAA Tournament," said Jones.
The Freeport native surely seems headed for more milestones. Meanwhile she is enhancing the image of her country. Her Bahamian status is always emphasized. Jones' bubbly nature, top court talent and academic application make her one of the prize students of George Washington.
A Bahamian has made good. It's a feather in the national cap. She is a goodwill sports ambassador.
Go Jonquel!

Part two in this series will be published on Tuesday, May 26.

o To respond to this column, kindly contact Fred Sturrup at Sturrup1504@gmail.com.

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NAGB celebrates Central Bank of The Bahamas

May 22, 2015

The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas NAGB has seen the ending of another prominent show - The Seventh National Exhibition, Antillean: an Ecology. A success by most measures, the exhibition provoked discussions about race, class, economy, privilege and gender from students at the primary level to senior generations. It transcended cultural and societal barriers to get people thinking about the intangible, but longstanding, barriers hindering the country's unity and progression.
Now the NAGB looks forward to opening its upcoming temporary exhibition, Celebrating 40 Years of The Central Bank: A Pillar of Arts Commitment.
Celebrating 40 Years of The Central Bank: A Pillar of Arts Commitment will highlight the role Central Bank of The Bahamas has played in developing the country's visual arts community since its founding. Organizers intend the show to commemorate Central Bank's commitment to serving as a reservoir of wealth in both financial and cultural spheres. The exhibition will showcase over 80 works by 72 artists featured in Central Bank's extensive art collection. Curated by NAGB Director Amanda Coulson, the show opens on June 2.

History
Central Bank of The Bahamas was established in 1974, and under the governance of T. Baswell Donaldson, it began investing in artwork to adorn its headquarters downtown.
By the bank's 10th anniversary in 1984, it already held a reasonable collection, with works by the early pioneers of Bahamian art, like Eddie Minnis, R. Brent Malone and Max Taylor. The bank's governor during those years, Sir William Allen, is remembered as a prominent supporter of the visual arts in The Bahamas. Under his leadership, Villa Doyle was purchased as the grounds for the future National Art Gallery of The Bahamas. He noted, during his term in office, that though many Bahamians were acquiring symbols of wealth during the economic boom, art was not included in the schema of markers of success the way that cars and clothing were; many Bahamian artists were still struggling.
With hopes of offering a continuous display of artwork to the public, the bank repurposed its reception area on Market Street and Trinity Place into a gallery space.
Establishing two annual competitions for high school students and artists under 26, respectively, Central Bank hoped to encourage young Bahamians to pursue art while adding to its collection simultaneously. Contest winners would receive cash prizes and have their work join the Central Bank collection.
The contests and gallery brought attention to art creation and collection and made a public statement about the importance of visual art in community.In 1984, noted artist Antonius Roberts was announced as the first Central Bank curator - a position he held for 10 years. It was his job to oversee the competition and exhibition space. Through his and his successors' work, the names and work of hundreds, if not thousands, of developing Bahamian artists came to public attention. Roberts has since returned to serve as the bank's curator.

Legacy
Today, the Central Bank high school and open category competitions continue to inspire the development of groundbreaking artists.
The talents of Jace McKinney, whose remarkable "Where is He Going, Where Has He Been" piece won the 2012 Central Bank Open Category Competition and now stands in the NAGB's permanent exhibition; it continues to wow gallery visitors on a regular basis.
Another young Bahamian who has benefited from the bank's commitment to fine art collection and promotion is Central Bank Assistant Curator Jodi Minnis. A young artist herself, Minnis works alongside Roberts as the Central Bank curatorial assistant. She is also known for her work with the NAGB as the gallery's assistant.
Jackson Petit is a third example of an artist linked to both the NAGB and Central Bank. The painter has worked in the NAGB's curatorial and digital media departments for 10 years. He jumpstarted his creative career early on with his "Nature Intertwined" piece, which won the bank's high school competition in 2001. In 2011, he won the bank's open competition with his "Beautiful Monsters" work. Both pieces will be featured in the upcoming exhibition at the NAGB.
Lavar Munroe, whose pieces are currently on display at the renowned Venice Biennale, also got his foot in the door with "My Love, My Passion, My Art" - a youthful experimentation that won him the 2003 open competition. He won again in 2009 with "You Must Be Wondering The Type of Creature I Am". These works will also be on display in Celebrating 40 Years of The Central Bank.
Roshanne Minnis Eyma and sister Nicole Minnis, who both recently exhibited at the NAGB in The Minnis-Eyma family exhibition, Creation's Grace, are among the many names of noteworthy Central Bank artists.
"The art show at the Central Bank of the Bahamas really helped to launch my career in art. I started competing at age 14, and it encouraged me to start producing professional work while still in high school. It gave me the validation and exposure I needed at the time to become a serious artist. I am forever grateful," said Minnis-Eyma.

The exhibition
At Celebrating 40 Years of The Central Bank: A Pillar of Arts Commitment, visitors will art representing the bank's history and its outstanding service to Bahamian art. Guests can look forward to experiencing works celebrating everyday Bahamian living. The bank's extensive collection of early development works including etches, photographs and drawings by now well-known artists in their early beginnings will also play a starring role in the show, and the exhibition's figure section will emphasize recognizable figures, like national pastimes in R. Brent Malone's "Junkanoo Cowbeller" and heritage in Erin Treco's "African Woman".
Celebrating 40 Years of The Central Bank: A Pillar of Arts Commitment opens at 6 p.m. on June 2 at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas. Also that night, the inaugural exhibition of the Double Dutch project, 50/50, starring works by Blue Curry and Bermudian artist James Cooper will open at the NAGB. For more information on the NAGB's upcoming exhibitions, contact the gallery at 328-5800 or visit its website at nagb.org.bs

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John Cox's works and Dawn Davies collection star at the D'Aguilar Art Foundation

May 22, 2015

The D'Aguilar Art Foundation is pleased to announce its upcoming exhibition, Balance/Reflection, featuring works by John Cox that have found a home in the expansive Dawn Davies collection.
For John Cox, balance is not so much a goal as a constant exercise in conscious creativity. Engaging the lifecycle of balance -- struggle, transcendence and acceptance -- he often manifests in his artwork a sense of a spiritual journey. His sculptural chairs and tables; emblematic objects; and images of struggle, love or desire offer reflections of our own cycles.
Designed to integrate into a home-life, John Cox's work has found the perfect home at Callaloo, Dawn Davies' home. Davies has collected artwork since 1969, and although her collection exceeds her wall and floor space now, she lives with an abundance of artwork, John's included. Davies knows the works intimately, having now lived with them longer than the artist themselves. She designs pedestals and plinths, marries works together in surprising ways and places them in spaces that have personal meaning, which, in turn, gives the work new layers and values.
The D'Aguilar Art Foundation is delighted to present a selection of John Cox's work spanning from his days as a student at Rhode Island School of Design to the present. These are pieces that Davies has curated into her life, offering the public a look at the union of these two committed practices: the making of art and the nurturing of art.
Balance/Reflection will be on display at the D'Aguilar Art Foundation from May 26 to August 13. The D'Aguilar Art Foundation is located on Virginia Street and is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, or by prior arrangement.

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NAGB announces new on-going commitment to linking the region's artists

May 22, 2015

With its eyes set on uniting the members of the region's visual art scene for the advancement of the Caribbean as a whole, The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas (NAGB) will be launching the inaugural Double Dutch project to do just that. The Double Dutch project is an ongoing commitment to exhibit the works of two artists - one from The Bahamas and the other from another nation in the region - in a two-person show at the NAGB. Each iteration of Double Dutch will be exhibited for two months with two projects occurring annually during summer.
The goal of Double Dutch is to bring local and regional artists -- who may be divided by distance or language but share common histories -- together by encouraging

them to work with a group of ideas that hone in on personal, political and social trends specific to the West Indies. The project presents a challenge with a set of conditions through which a provocative body of work is produced through collaboration and exchange. This, Double Dutch organizers say, is crucial to the development of a contemporary Caribbean identity.
The project's name is a play on the classic jump-rope game of the same title. Double Dutch is played with two separate ropes turning in opposite directions by two rope turners. There may be one or more jumpers. To be successful at the game, the jumpers and turners must find synchronization, consider actions, balance and each other's momentum.
Similarly Double Dutch artists will be working in pairs. Together they will form the 'rope turners'. In this instance, Bahamian-born, London-based artist Blue Curry, and Bermudian artist James Cooper have agreed to unite for the first iteration of Double Dutch. The artists are familiar with each other's work - they collaborated at Liquid Courage Gallery in 2014 as part of the 10-year planning process for Transforming Spaces. Under the exhibition, Title the Flood, Cooper and Curry borrowed and expanded the idea of Le Corbusier's Museum of Unlimited Growth.
Continuing the trajectory, the two will now present an interrelated body of work at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas in a show titled 50/50. A double entendre, the exhibition's title refers to two counterparts on equal footing as well as the 50 works Curry and Cooper will each present at the show.
Cooper's series of digital images explores his relationship to photography and its inherent evolution and flexibility. His 50/50 contribution, titled "REDTREE", attempts to find a balance between the representational qualities of photography and abstraction.
Blue Curry's untitled intervention will further scrutinize the use of industrially-produced objects designed for mass consumption. By repurposing hair combs, the artist creates a typology of a new object on display and shown in repetition, as if forming a collection of a new cultural artifact. This critical approach fetishizing commercial objects is now a central component of the artist's practice.
Together, the artists seek to tap into an open space investigating two themes: "story", which targets regional concepts such as trade and diaspora, and "color", which encompasses colloquial classifications of race such as 'tar', 'mango-skinned', 'salt', 'red' and 'pure'.
The inaugural Double Dutch exhibition, 50/50 will open at the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas on June 2 and will be on display until July 27.

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'FNM leadership will not change'

May 22, 2015

The current leadership team of the Free National Movement (FNM) will lead the party into the 2017 general election, FNM Chairman Michael Pintard declared yesterday...

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Christian Council president says NHI tax a bad idea

May 22, 2015

Just over five months following the introduction of value-added tax (VAT), Bahamas Christian Council (BCC) President Dr. Ranford Patterson said VAT is "killing Bahamians" and suggested that the implementation of any tax associated with National Health Insurance (NHI) would be the final nail in the coffin...

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Lightbourn calls on AG to make Gray report public

May 22, 2015

Montagu MP Richard Lightbourn is calling for the attorney general to make public the police file turned in after their investigation into allegations MICAL MP V. Alfred Gray interfered in a judicial matter in his constituency on March 19...

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Carnival payments 'still being processed'

May 22, 2015

The Bahamas National Festival Commission (BNFC) is still processing outstanding payments for people who worked during Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival...

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BEC staff told no 'large purchases' ahead of new management deal

May 22, 2015

Weeks after he expressed concern that there may be job losses at the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) as a result of the management deal, Bahamas Electrical Workers Union (BEWU) President Paul Maynard said yesterday BEC management sought to ease those fears but advised workers against "making any large purchases" ahead of the transition phase...

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Govt commissions study on mold in police stations

May 22, 2015

Minister of State for National Security Keith Bell said yesterday the Ministry of Health is conducting a review of the police stations that were alleged to have mold...

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Sentencing delayed for man convicted of abetment to murder

May 22, 2015

The sentencing hearing for a man convicted of abetting the murder of the teenage son of convicted drug traffickers Dwight and Keva Major has been adjourned to June 11...

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Two arraigned for endangering life of police

May 22, 2015

Two men police say were arrested following a confrontation with police over the weekend were arraigned yesterday on five counts of firearm possession with intent to endanger life and possession of an assault rifle...

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Junkanoo: suggestions for the future

May 22, 2015

Dear Editor,
After being involved in Junkanoo for many years, after watching the recent Junkanoo Carnival and after hearing criticisms by some in the Junkanoo community, I wish to offer a few unsolicited suggestions. Before I do, a few comments:
The criticism of carnival by Junkanooers and some entertainers centered basically around the claim that the government was expending over $9 million on a foreign concept - carnival - when that money could be better spent on Junkanoo or on local artists. My view is that most Bahamian musicians have an exalted perception of the quality of their handicraft, and in so doing, fail to acknowledge that there is room for improvement.
Carnival and its accompanying celebrations cater to a specific clientele. It is not for everyone nor is it for all genres of music.
Junkanoo has been staged in the Bahamas for generations and has never attracted the attention of the business community nor tourists as did the first carnival. A matter of marketing and promotion you may say, and you would be half accurate.
I am of the view that the government owes Junkanoo a shot in the arm with an infusion of resources geared toward promotion and marketing somewhere on the scale spent on the carnival. The Junkanoo community, after having the benefit of greater marketing and promotional support, then owes Bahamians and the business community more in-depth thought and creativity in their presentations.
They owe it to the Bahamian public, their sponsors, the arts and to themselves to produce a far better product than what they have done over the past few years.
One of the aspects of the recent carnival which was appealing to Bahamians was the feature of crowd participation. The Road Fever or whatever it was called, was incredible for a first time event. It allowed hundreds of Bahamians to be involved who would not have normally participated in Junkanoo.
It is a dimension Junkanoo could and should embrace. Even the concert events allowed the public to jump up and dance to band music rather than being stuck on bleachers.
Now, for some suggestions for Junkanoo:
First, I say create a Junkanoo season inclusive of four major events all held between Boxing Day and New Years Day. These should include:
o Junior Junkanoo, which should be moved back to Bay Street as I believe it is more suitable logistically there for younger children than the national stadium. The senior schools should be separated from the main Junior Junkanoo parade as most of those young people rush for one of the senior Junkanoo groups.
o A parade featuring only B category groups inclusive of the Music Makers and Prodigal Sons, both of whom are much closer to the B groups than the other four A category groups in terms of numbers and quality of their presentations; with the addition of the two former A groups to the B category and perhaps Genesis, a newly formed group, the B category would be dynamic, competitive and quite able to stand on its own.
o A competitive parade featuring the four A groups. The individuals and the fun groups could be accommodated in either the A or B parade.
o A non-competitive rush-out featuring all the groups in t-shirts and members of the public who want to rush with their favorite group using an alternative road route that does not include Bay Street. Members of the public will have to purchase a group t-shirt to parade with a group.
I do not have a preference for the order or scheduling for these four events but the B category could perhaps start the festival off on Boxing Day while the A group parade could serve as a grand finale to the Junkanoo season, the evening of New Years Day. The Junior Junkanoo Parade will have to be held in the afternoon or evening hours one day in the season.
Separating the parades according to categories of groups would eliminate the need for the groups to produce two sets of costumes and should enhance significantly the quality of costumes while reducing the duration of both parades.
Through improving the quality of costumes and by shortening the duration of the parades, we should experience more appealing and exciting parades. I envisage the rush-out to be a fun event parading through the streets of New Providence and concluding with a concert featuring top bands in the evening hours.
The management of the parades and all aspects of the judging should be removed from the responsibility of the Junkanoo Corporation of New Providence (JCNP) as I see inherent conflicts in this present arrangement.
Bahamians are sick and tired of the complaints and protests by Junkanoo groups after each and every parade. We have to appoint or select judges and learn to respect their decisions.
As Bahamians we have to accept and trust people's judgements which may be different from ours. The fact that you worked hard and long does not entitle you to win.
Every group feels as if it worked hard and long in the shacks.
The Junkanoo season ought to end with the awards banquetevent the first weekend after New Years day. The event should take the format of the various awards ceremonies held in the U.S. at the beginning of the year.
The results of the parades should be withheld until this event and not rushed the evening of the parade as is done presently.
I hold that the judging of the parades could be made significantly easier by having one common theme chosen by the National Junkanoo Committee. This way the judges will be able to compare apples with apples.
I truly believe that all penalties ought to be eliminated except for a group starting late as this disrupts the flow of the parade and results in long delays between the groups. Penalties applied or not applied seem to be the primary causes for much of the tumult in judging.
Most of these suggestions are not new and have been discussed over the years in the Junkanoo community. But that is exactly the problem with Junkanoo! The leaders are too comfortable in what they now produce and will not admit that the parades they put on bore Bahamians and need a major overhaul.

- Maurice Tynes

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Gender equality in limbo

May 22, 2015

Back in December of last year, Prime Minister Perry Christie said he hopes the long-awaited referendum on gender equality would be held no later than June 30, 2015...

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Haiti, Francois Hollande and the issue of reparations

May 22, 2015

It might seem arrogant to reveal but the issue of reparations for Haiti did not start with Dr Jean Bertrand Aristide; it started with me...

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Students graduate from YEA environmental program

May 22, 2015

Friends and family members filled the halls of Wallace Groves Auditorium of Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Primary School to cheer on just under 30 students as they walked across the stage as certified leaders and environmentalists graduating from the Youth Environment Ambassador (YEA) program, spearheaded by fast-growing environmental group, Save The Bays (STB)...

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Another Bahamian signs with a D-I school

May 21, 2015

Anthony Pratt is the latest to join the growing list of Bahamian basketball players on National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I rosters...

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