Nassau Guardian Stories

Abaco chief councilor calls for EIA release

December 02, 2013

North Abaco's chief councilor has called for the public release of an environmental impact assessment demonstrating the projected impact of a dredging and development project being carried out by a foreign developer in the Treasure Cay area.
His comments come as an environmentalist group is raising the alarm over the project, which they call "yet another irresponsible construction project" in the Family Islands.
Following a recent tour of the Treasure Sands Club in Abaco, directors from Save The Bays expressed concern and dismay over dredging off a world-famous beach.
Treasure Cay is known for its pristine three miles of uninterrupted sand. Save The Bays said Bahamians are expressing "deep pain" over the alleged lack of transparency and dialogue by developers, a sentiment being echoed by local officials.
Tim Blakely, vice president for the Treasure Sands Club, has maintained that the company received approval from the central government for the project and that it will bring much needed economic development to the island.
"We just want to know what the impact will be," said Gary Smith, chief councilor for the North Abaco District. "We want to see an environmental impact assessment performed by an independent, reputable company. We want to see the environmental management plan written by Keith Bishop, principal engineer at Islands by Design, and we would like to see the extent of the plans that Treasure Sands has for this area."
The development currently features a high-end club, pool, bar and restaurant experience, although plans are afoot to build a boutique hotel on the beach and docking facilities.
Smith urged both the developer and government to engage the public and follow the rules of public consultation before starting construction in a delicate ecosystem.
Joseph Darville, Bimini waterkeeper and a director for Save The Bays, said the dredging may cause "irreparable damage" to the habitat of bonefish, tarpon, snappers, turtles, lobsters and a host of other marine species. Development could "drive away" wildlife, he said, and the area is bordered by fragile mangroves.
Save The Bays' protest in Abaco is the third major campaign against unregulated development for the growing environmental movement in recent months.
In Bimini, Malaysia-based conglomerate, the Genting Group, is moving ahead with a 1,000-foot pier to accommodate cruise ships from Florida in an effort to fuel a new mega project and Save The Bays has continued to agitate to make Clifton Park a protected marine area.
Similar to the issues that have arisen in Bimini, the Treasure Sands Club did not release an environmental impact assessment or an environmental management plan to the public and local residents were not consulted prior to the start of construction, Save the Bays asserts.
Fred Smith, QC, a top attorney and another director for Save The Bays, noted "that activities in Treasure Cay are indicative of what is happening throughout the country."
Smith, who is also a partner at Callenders & Co, has pushed government for the promised Freedom of Information Act, which he feels would offer more transparency and accountability.
"More than 5,000 people have signed a Save The Bays petition urging passage of a Freedom of Information Act and an Environmental Protection Act," he said and he called on central government to stop "ignoring the laws and casting aside the pleas of local officials".

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Local attorney: Bahamas must keep pace with global trends

December 02, 2013

With international business and cross-border transactions increasing dramatically, a partner in a local law firm said it is critical for Bahamians practicing law to keep pace with legal precedence, trends and changes in other jurisdictions.
Fresh from attending the International Lawyers Network (ILN) 2013 conference in Miami, Halsbury Chambers partner, Nerissa Greene, said issues of taxation, employment, energy and natural resources - once thought to be local - have such global repercussions today that attorneys who practice in The Bahamas need to keep abreast of evolving trends.
"It is no longer a luxury to remain abreast of changing judicial precedent, practices and procedures in other parts of the world, it is essential," said Greene, who specializes in real estate, conveyancing, family law, and civil and corporate law. "As responsible legal advisors and consultants, we must be 110 percent current with the ever-evolving face of law."
Although much of the conference focused on energy production and dissemination, including issues related to natural gas and fracking that don't pertain to The Bahamas, the value of seeing how fast law was being created in new fields could not be underestimated, Greene said.
"I think there is a misconception among the general public that law is static, that it's what is written in those leather-bound books that dominate law libraries. The reality is that while principles largely remain constant, nuances in the law change with great frequency and the procedural matters, evidentiary requirements, standards are always under scrutiny and can flip with a single case that sets new precedent," said the attorney who first rose to prominence by highlighting the benefits of pre-nuptial agreements.
Greene said attending the ILN 2013 conference also allowed her to network with attorneys from Asia, the U.S., Canada, Latin America and Europe. Membership in the ILN is limited and by invitation only. Halsbury Chambers is the official Bahamas member of the association of 91 high-quality, full-service law firms with over 5,000 lawyers world-wide. The ILN provides clients with easily accessible legal services in 67 countries on six continents.
"As attorneys, particularly in civil matters, we represent clients who may have interests in multiple jurisdictions so whether those clients are individuals or large enterprises, we need to be prepared to advise them appropriately because they may be comparing doing business in The Bahamas with doing business elsewhere," said Greene, "and that counsel can range from employment to taxation matters."
Greene's participation in the international conference was the second by a Halsbury Chambers attorney in recent weeks.
Earlier in November, estate planning specialist Mikia Cooper, a Halsbury Chambers associate, attended the 1st Annual Private Wealth Latin America and the Caribbean Forum in Miami, helping to boost the profile of The Bahamas. Minister of Financial Services Ryan Pinder was among the speakers at that conference, touting this country's competence in handling the most complex of wealth, asset management and investment matters.

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Teachers move near to strike
Teachers move near to strike

December 02, 2013

The Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT) will not relent in its protest against the government and will hold a general meeting for teachers in New Providence today to poll them on whether they support taking a strike vote...

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Cop stabbed in the head
Cop stabbed in the head

December 02, 2013

An off-duty police officer was stabbed in the head with a knife and a screwdriver by two men on Elizabeth Avenue early yesterday morning, one of four stabbing incidents police reported over the weekend...

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Police question suspects in disappearance of Andros couple
Police question suspects in disappearance of Andros couple

December 02, 2013

Police are questioning several men in connection with the "suspicious" disappearance of an Andros couple, Assistant Commissioner Anthony Ferguson said yesterday...

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Laing questions KPMG involvement in BEC deal

December 02, 2013

Former Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing has questioned why the Christie administration has hired KPMG Bahamas to advise on the reform of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC), when the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) criticized the firm for its involvement in the privatization of the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC).
KMPG is one of the government's advisors for the breakup of BEC and will make recommendations to the government this month about the preferred bidders that propose to take over the corporation's management and power generation.
The company also advised the Ingraham administration before it sold BTC to Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC).
While in opposition, the PLP opposed the deal and at one time questioned if KMPG was in a conflict because it was one of the financial and regulatory advisors to the BTC privatization committee and an external auditor of CWC.
"It would be odd that they would decide to use KPMG when you consider the harsh criticism they seem to levy against their participation in the BTC privatization, even to the extent of invoking conflict of interest [claims]," Laing said.
"I would think that one would be concerned to use any entity that you alleged may have been caught up in a conflict of interest to do any work for you. Because anybody who is caught up in a conflict of interest that you deemed credible can't at the same time be trusted by you to do work that doesn't involve a conflict of interest."
The Nassau Guardian contacted Laing for comment after a PLP MP, who did not want to be named, expressed displeasure that the government had engaged KMPG for advice on the BEC deal.
The former administration sold 51 percent of BTC to CWC in 2011. Since assuming office, the Christie administration has been in negotiations to regain the majority of shares of the company.
The government's lead negotiator, businessman Franklyn Wilson, has said previously that the sale was a "horrendously bad deal".
"To use an advisor on a deal you described as atrociously bad would speak volumes about whether or not you really believed what you said you believed when you made the claim against us," Laing said. "You don't turn around and use advisors on a bad deal to do a new deal for you. That's odd, but that's the world we live in now."
Yesterday, Wilson said he never criticized KPMG's involvement in BTC's privatization, but has only found flaws in the Ingraham administration's decisions over the sale.
"KPMG didn't make any executive decisions, the executive decisions in BTC were made by the government of the day and it's the executive decisions that were criticized, not the advice," Wilson said.
"I never criticized KPMG. I criticized to me what I called horrendously bad decisions and they were made by the Cabinet of The Bahamas.
"They didn't make the decisions just as I assume in this instance they would not make the decisions as it relates to BEC."
Negotiations over the two percent stake in BTC appeared to be in limbo in October after CWC announced that its CEO Tony Rice resigned.
His successor, Phil Bentley will assume his position on January 1, 2014.
Yesterday, Wilson said he could not give an update on the BTC talks.

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Government cancels contract for court reporting unit

December 02, 2013

The government has terminated the contract of Ludell Theophilus, who worked as a consultant in the Court Reporting Unit since 1999.
Last month, Theophilus reportedly received notice to vacate the Bay Street premises by December 31, nine months before her contract was set to expire on September 30, 2014. Government canceled the contract due to alleged breaches.
The move now raises questions about the future employment of the 22 court reporters who work for Theophilus' company, LET Consultancy, when the contract expires. The remaining 18 reporters work for the public service.
Bahamas Public Services Union (BPSU) President John Pinder told The Nassau Guardian yesterday that he is working to ensure that the private court reporters transition to the public service before the end of the year so there are no disruptions in the court.
Pinder said that reporters provide an essential service. He said more workers are needed for the new courts set to come on stream next year.
Privately contracted workers carried out industrial action in September over unpaid wages and the uncertainty of their careers.
The pay issues were resolved but the workers voiced concern about their future when Theophilus' contract comes to an end.
Theophilus, the first Bahamian to qualify as a court reporter, managed the public services reporters and her staff until this year.
That arrangement ended in January 2013 when Enith Darling was appointed as acting director of Court Reporting Services. Royanne Morrison and Judith Clare were appointed acting deputy directors.
However, they have not been paid for their services. Pinder said Attorney General Allyson Maynard-Gibson has assured him those pay issues will soon be rectified.

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Some St. John's students reimbursed

December 02, 2013

The Anglican Central Education Authority (ACEA) has reimbursed members of the St. John's College 2013 graduating class who did not participate in ditch day or participate in a provocative dance at a school function, The Nassau Guardian has learned.
The decision is in line with a suggestion by Chief Justice Sir Michael Barnett, who said the ACEA was not in breach of contract when it decided to cancel the school's graduation and prom as punishment for the students' behavior.
Sir Michael said in the ruling, "I cannot leave this judgement without expressing my sympathy for those plaintiffs and their parents who have not participated in any of the misconduct complained of by the defendants.
"No amount of money can really compensate them for the disappointment they undoubtedly endured by not culminating their high school career with the traditional graduation exercises."
Sir Michael said there is no evidence to prove the ACEA was unreasonable.
"In the present case, the defendant would only be in breach if that decision was capricious, arbitrary and unreasonable," he said.
"That is to say, the defendant would only be in breach if no operator of the school acting reasonable could have made the decision that it made to exclude all students from participating in graduation ceremonies."
Sir Michael said he is not satisfied that the decision was "capricious, arbitrary, perverse or unreasonable for the defendant to exclude all students from participating in a graduation ceremony".

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Two arrested after teen's murder

December 02, 2013

Police have arrested two men in connection with the shooting death of a teenager who died last Thursday, Assistant Commissioner Anthony Ferguson said yesterday.
The two suspects were taken in for questioning over the death of Sylvester Woodside, 18, who was shot to the head while in Jubilee Gardens.
Ferguson said the men were arrested in the area of Grant's Street, Fox Hill yesterday.
Police found Woodside lying on the side of the street.
"What we know is he was walking, and he was accosted by a lone male who was riding a motorcycle," Superintendent Paul Rolle said at the scene.
"This male got off the motorcycle, produced a handgun and shot the victim."
Rolle said police briefly chased the suspect, but he was able to escape.
The Jubilee Gardens incident pushed the country's murder count to 101 for 2013, according to The Nassau Guardian's records.
Police were called to the scene of Woodside's murder while they were investigating the death of a teenager who was shot after he allegedly tried to rob a business on Minnie Street.
The Guardian understands that the victim was Antoine Thompson, 17.
Rolle said a second robbery suspect was able to escape. He appealed to family or friends of the suspect to turn him in, adding that police are searching for him.
Dozens of onlookers gathered near that scene trying to catch a glimpse of the victim, whose body was on the ground in a pool of blood near the road.
Family members on the scene were inconsolable.
An area resident, who

did not wish to be named, said she spoke with the victim earlier in the day.
"He told me he was going on a mission," she said. "This was the mission right here."

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FNMs are their own worst enemies

December 02, 2013

It wouldn't take a political scientist from Havard University to see that the Free National Movement (FNM) is a deeply fractured party. FNMs are their own worst enemies...

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Ten reasons why VAT is wrong for The Bahamas

December 02, 2013

VAT will eliminate the taxes on business income and shift them 100 percent to the consumer. This violates a basic tenet of fairness: He who earns it should pay...

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The undocumented migrant

December 02, 2013

At the 68th General Assembly of the United Nations, the prime minister spoke of illegal immigration as a matter of the "highest national priority"...

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The VAT series, pt. 2
The VAT series, pt. 2

December 02, 2013

paying down the national debt is beneficial for the economy: It keeps interest rates lower than they otherwise would be and frees savings to finance increases in the capital stock, thereby boosting productivity and real incomes."- Alan Greenspan, former Federal Reserve chairman...

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From kitchen star to Salvation Army chef

November 30, 2013

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) --
Jeff Ansorge once commanded a staff of 17 and made around $80,000 a year as executive chef at a posh downtown Minneapolis restaurant where a 24-ounce dry aged Porterhouse steak goes for $48. But he gave it all up to become the head cook of a Salvation Army soup kitchen, where the meals are free. Now he brings his culinary skills to bear making salmon, ribs and stews for the poor and homeless who come to The Salvation Army Eastside Corps Community Center in St. Paul. For the Thanksgiving meal that's being served Wednesday, Ansorge planned a traditional feast of turkey with stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, cranberry sauce and rolls, served on tables covered with white tablecloths.
"It is not your old-fashioned soup kitchen where you get a bowl of soup and a piece of bread and (are) sent on your way. He makes phenomenal meals that you would pay quite a bit of money to go to a restaurant and have," Salvation Army Capt. John Joyner said of Ansorge, who left The Capital Grille to run the soup kitchen.
The clients agree. "This is outstanding. On a scale of 1 to 10, I give him an 8-and-a-half, yep," Donnie Richardson, 55, a homeless man from St. Paul, said over a meal of chicken thighs, rice and mixed vegetables in the center's white-walled gymnasium. Ansorge, 40, says a spiritual awakening led him to his new job at the soup kitchen in October 2012, making just onethird of his previous salary. "I went through a divorce. I was suffering from major depression for four years. And my priorities were all wrong,"Ansorge recalled while standing near the center's pantry shelves. "I wanted the highpaying job. I wanted the big house. I wanted the cars. I wanted all that. And ultimately, none of that satisfied me."Ansorge started cooking when he was 16 at a mom-andpop restaurant. He went to school in Rhode Island, earning degrees in culinary arts and food service management before joining The Capital Grille, where he spent 12 years.Now Ansorge is lucky to get as many as three volunteers to help him in the soup kitchen. On a recent Thursday, Ansorge -- a trim man with short gray hair -- set up the tables, seasoned, seared and baked the chicken thighs, dished up meals and wiped down the tables afterward. Instead of a traditional white chef's hat and uniform, he wears a dark blue T-shirt with the words "SHIELD CREW" in white with the red Salvation Army insignia, and blue jeans.
Raised Catholic, Ansorge -- a former altar boy -- said he drifted away from his faith in his 20s and 30s. Despite his prominent position at the restaurant, Ansorge said he was spiraling downward.
"My priorities were backwards. I had a big mortgage, I had car payments, I had credit card debts," Ansorge said. "And now I have none of that."He sent about 10 applications to mainly Christian nonprofits, hoping to make a change. He chose The Salvation Army because "it's a nonprofit that works with people that need help."
Joyner said The Salvation Army initially felt Ansorge was overqualified. But none of the other candidates seemed a good fit.
"His credentials are unbelievable. He could easily be making two, three times what he makes working for us. But he told us that he wanted to give back and he really wanted to do this," Joyner said.
Susan Dunlop, chef and coowner of Joan's In The Park restaurant in St. Paul, worked with Ansorge for nearly three years at The Capital Grille. She says she's not surprised by his decision.
"That's his true passion. He wanted to do something where he was giving back to the community," Dunlop said. "It's who he is. He needs to do that to be happy."
Ansorge didn't just bring cooking skills. Joyner said Ansorge's shopping skills save the organization money.
Ansorge said he looks for bargains on food nearing its expiration date that grocery stores don't want to sell but has been frozen and is salvageable. The Salvation Army also has a partnership with the Second Harvest Heartland food bank that allows it to get 40-pound cases of mixed poultry for $5, he said. Before Ansorge came to the soup kitchen, The Salvation Army spent $28,000 on its lunch program at the East Side center. In Ansorge's first year there, he spent $13,000 on the lunch program. The center serves from 80 to 140 people each day at its Monday through Friday noon meal.
Ansorge also tries to bring nutritional value to whatever meal he serves. For some, it may be their only meal of the day.
He's eliminated desserts and cut back on the fat and sugars in meals.
"I don't want to feed them anything that I wouldn't eat,"he said. "I try to feed them something that I would feed to my own family."

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Two charged with separate murders

November 30, 2013

Two men were charged yesterday for two spearate murders that happened earlier this week.
Jermaine Taylor, 23, was charged with one count of murder and three counts of attempted murder.
Taylor was charged with the murder of Leonardo Cash and the attempted murders of Angelo Cash, Christopher Johnson and Wilson Lacroix that happened on November 26 (Tuesday).
Police said the men were shot on Ethel Street, Montell Heights.
According to Superintendent Stephen Dean, three men in a blue Honda exited the vehicle and opened fire on the men, then fled in their vehicle.
Taylor was not required to enter a plea.
Magistrate Andrew Forbes remanded Taylor to Her Majesty's Prisons.
He adjourned the matter to February 3, 2014 when Taylor would be served a voluntary bill of indictment.
Taylor noted that he was unable to contact his lawyer.
Vincent McKinney, 51, was charged with the murder of Raymond Servius, which also happened on November 26.
McKinney was also not required to enter a plea and was remanded to Her Majesty's Prisons.
Police said that victim was beaten to death at Miami Street.
Police said the victim got into a fight with another man at a house in the area around 9 p.m. and the victim was struck with a blunt instrument and killed.
McKinney, who had a wound to an eye, said he was stabbed to the eye during a fight.
Forbes informed him that he would ensure that the injury was properly treated before he left for prison.
McKinney's matter was adjourned to February 3, when he will be served a voluntary bill of indictment.

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VAT draft bill and regulations made public

November 30, 2013

The Ministry of Finance officially released the draft value-added tax (VAT) bill and regulations yesterday.
A copy of both as well as a guide to the bill and regulations were posted on the ministry's website.
"The drafts of the value-added tax bill and regulations are being released to expand the public discussion and consultation process on the fiscal reform initiative," the ministry said on its website.
"The draft VAT bill would be tabled in Parliament after the conclusion of the public consultation process.
"Based on the results of the public discussions and consultations, appropriate amendments to the draft bill would be made."
The Guardian reported on the draft bill and regulations last month. Much of what was contained in the leaked copy remains, save for a few small changes.
Religious services by an institution of religious worship; games of chance, gambling and lotteries within the meaning of the Lotteries and Gaming Act and education services remain as some of the exempt supplies of services.
Chicken, pork, sheep, goat and horse meat, sausages and sandwich meat, among others would remain VAT exempt.
The 10-15 percent tax rate at which VAT is proposed to be implemented remains.
Prime Minister Perry Christie said earlier this week that government may consider a recommendation from financial advisor James Smith not to have VAT implemented at a rate higher than 10 percent.
The threshold for VAT registrants is $100,000 and hotels have a tax discount of 10 percent on all accommodations, services and food and beverage sales.
The government has said VAT is necessary to bring down the government's massive deficit and get the country's spiraling debt situation under control.
Ministry of Finance officials estimate that VAT can generate about $200 million in annual revenue.
The ministry's website also has a timer, counting down to the VAT implementation date, stating that it is 212 days away.

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BUT 'seriously considering' a strike vote

November 30, 2013

Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT) President Belinda Wilson said yesterday that the teachers are "seriously considering" a strike vote.
"The BUT is not on strike yet and is seriously considering a strike vote," Wilson said.
This after Director of Labour Robert Farquharson warned public school teachers earlier this week that further industrial action would be illegal because trade disputes filed against the government by the BUT have been referred to the Industrial

Tribunal.
But yesterday, Wilson dismissed his warning.
"I want to remind Director Farquharson that both the union and the government must abide by the law, and he should not be spreading the government's propaganda but making sure that they follow his instructions," Wilson said in a statement.
"He needs to warn the government, not the union."
During a press conference on Thursday, Farquharson said under the Industrial Relations Act, once grievances are forwarded to the tribunal, it is illegal to engage or encourage industrial action. He said a letter was sent to the BUT on November 20, explaining that the trade disputes had been sent to the tribunal for arbitration.
He also said that the Ministry of Education has suspended the process of cutting the salaries of teachers who took part in a September 9 demonstration, pending a Supreme Court decision on
the matter.
"These matters are of national importance, but what is important for me is to ensure that the statute laws of The Bahamas are followed," Farquharson said at the press conference at the Department of Labour.
"Once a matter has been referred to the Industrial Tribunal, all industrial action must cease. And any talk about strike action relative to this dispute, if it is done, will be in contravention of the act. That's very important for members of the Bahamas Union of Teachers to be aware [of]."
Wilson said the BUT was not informed that the pay cut was suspended and said she was "surprised to hear the director of labor inform the public via a press conference".
She added that the BUT has petitioned the court for access to school campuses.
The BUT has communicated to the International Labour Organization (ILO) on two matters including union denied access to school campuses and the health and safety concerns at Stephen Dillet and Uriah McPhee Primary Schools.
Those are just some of the concerns that the BUT says it has with the Ministry of Education.
Education Minister Jerome Fitzgerald said on multiple occasions that the BUT will only be allowed on campus during after school hours or in the case of an emergency.
But Wilson insists that the Ministry of Education can not deny the union access during school hours.
As it relates to the health and safety concerns, Fitzgerald said the ministry has spent over $700,000 affecting repairs to both schools.
He said both institutions have been approved by the Department of Environmental Health for occupancy.
He added that at no time did the school environment pose health risks to students.
The BUT filed seven trade disputes against the Ministry of Education between September 2 and 25, Farquharson said. He said three conciliation meetings were held that month to address the issues.
On November 6, the BUT issued a cease order for all teachers who normally participate in afterschool activities as the union began work to rule throughout the country.

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Man shot dead by police in domestic dispute

November 30, 2013

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama - A 33-year-old West End man was shot dead by police following a domestic dispute early yesterday morning.
Shortly after 1:30 a.m, officers were called to a house on Queen's Highway following reports of a man attacking his girlfriend with a knife. Police said that on arrival at the scene, officers found a woman bleeding from the head.
"A male was following the

female with a knife in his hand and was ordered by the officer to drop the knife," said police. "He refused and charged towards the officer with the knife putting the officer in fear for his life. As a result, the officer withdrew his service revolver, discharging it, hitting the male in the upper shoulder."
The man and woman were taken to Rand Memorial Hospital. The man died from his wound.
Up to press time last night, the woman involved in the incident - 32-year-old Felicity Rolle - was being treated at hospital for multiple injuries to her head, hand, legs, neck and back.
In an exclusive interview with The Freeport News, Rolle, also a resident of West End, said the dispute started "suddenly" after she and her boyfriend returned home after stopping at a bar.
"Both of us were drinking," she said. "We came home and all of a sudden, he just start cursing and carrying on with me."
Just hours before, the pair visited their three-month-old son who is in the Rand's Pediatric Ward. However, when they got home, Rolle said he accused her of cheating and denied that their two sons were his.
Rolle said the argument escalated and he began to physically assault her.
"My little boy got out, and I held him because he was crying, and he continued to hit me with our little boy in my hand," she claimed.
"When he took the baby from me and gone cross by his cousin, I run in the back by his brother."
It was there she said she phoned police for assistance.
Before they could arrive, Rolle said he came to his brother's home, located just at the rear of his house, and continued arguing with her.
According to Rolle, the man became even more violent, punching, biting and scratching her.
"He grabbed the iron out of the closet and hit me in my head," she said.
"I said, 'If you don't want me around you, why you want to kill me?'... I said, 'Why you doing this to me and I'm supposed to be your children's mother?' But he just kept on hitting me."
Recalling the events of yesterday morning, Rolle said she was sure she would die. She said she prayed that God would bring her out of the altercation for the sake of her children.
Luckily, Rolle added, police arrived at the residence soon after her boyfriend retrieved a knife and attempted to stab her with it.
The officer ordered him to drop the weapon several times, but he refused, Rolle recalled.
"He went after [the officer] and [the officer] drew his weapon and shot him," Rolle said.
Shortly after, emergency medical services and Central Detective Unit officers were called to the scene of the altercation and shooting, according to police.
Both Rolle and her boyfriend were taken to the Rand for medical attention. Police said the boyfriend died in hospital around 3:30 a.m.
At the time of her interview with The Freeport News, Rolle was unaware of her boyfriend's death.
During that time, she expressed the hope that he would survive his injury because she wants her children to know their father. Rolle added that she did not hold a grudge against him, but hoped he would eventually change his life.
"I hope God could change him because that's what he needs," she said.
Rolle revealed that they were involved in a similar dispute two weeks ago, during which time, she said, he hit her in the head with a bottle.
"He's a nice person, but when he drinks, he's a totally different person," she said.
Rolle has since been notified of his death. She said they had been dating for three years, but broke up often. However, she returned to him each time, stating that she wanted the relationship to work for their children's sake.
Rolle is the mother of four - one girl and three boys.
The deceased is the father of Rolle's two youngest sons.

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Final resolution on Baha Mar road could happen by year's end

November 30, 2013

Ministry of Works technical experts are reviewing Baha Mar's new proposal for payment for the rerouted West Bay Street, with the government still eyeing an amicable resolution before the end of the year, Deputy Prime Minister Philip Brave Davis said this week.
"I met with Baha Mar [Tuesday]," he told The Nassau Guardian during a recent interview.
"They provided us with all their documentation that we are now going through. I am awaiting my advice from my technical team before we go ahead."
Davis, who is also the minister of works and urban development, said the Christie administration will not make any more payments to Baha Mar to cover its portion of costs for road works associated with the project until negotiations over the final figure the government will pay are concluded.
After months of wrangling, Davis said he hoped the situation would be wrapped up before the end of the year.
Under the heads of agreement between the resort and the government, the cost of the road's construction was meant to be shared.
The government is obligated to pay $47.8 million to Baha Mar if the cost of reconfiguration of West Bay Street exceeded $70 million, Davis previously explained.
He said if the figure is less than $70 million, the government would only be obligated to pay 50 percent.
Government technical experts have reportedly assessed the value of the roads at around $58 million. However, Baha Mar officials said road works total over $100 million.
A source close to the matter previously told The Nassau Guardian that the Christie administration has reportedly paid the developers of Baha Mar more than $30 million over the past year.
Davis said that the previous payments were made in two tranches.
In September, Robert Sands, Baha Mar's senior vice president of administration and external affairs, told The Guardian the Christie administration has paid more than 50 percent of the $48.3 million it says is owed.

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Road repairs may cost less than thought

November 30, 2013

The government may have to dish out less money than expected to complete the corrective work identified for the New Providence Road Improvement Program (NPRIP), Deputy Prime Minister Philip Brave Davis said recently.
Davis announced in the House of Assembly in May that the government will have to spend as much as $3.8 million to replace leaking underground fittings used in the NPRIP and to repave the affected roads.
But Davis said earlier this week that the final price tag is expected to be much lower and the government may not even be required to pay.
"I think because of the various options that we are examining to correct what we are discovering, it ranges anywhere from $300,000 to $3 million or $4 million, but from what I see going on, it may not pass that lower range of $300,000," he said.
Work began on the defective roads several weeks ago. Contractors have dug scores of trenches along Baillou Hill Road and Market Street.
Davis said that in 2010, the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC) asked the Ministry of Works to replace laterals on existing water mains on several roads: Baillou Hill Road between Wulff Road and Duke Street; Market Street between Wulff Road and Duke Street; and on Baillou Hill Road South between Soldier Road and Carmichael Road.
"We are repairing those now," Davis said. "We are still in what they call a defective period. In this period, we look at what's right and what's wrong and where there are breaches and then that is being corrected.
"So during this defective liability period, we are having these corrections done. We have not yet determined liability but we have agreed to at least get these works started during this period and hopefully at the end of it all, when a determination is made, we will decide who will pay for it."
Davis previously lamented the fact that the government would have to pay more money for the already over-budget project, which he said has caused the public and businesses "hardship and inconvenience" over the past three years.
Explaining how the problems surface, Davis earlier explained that WSC specified and provided Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles (JCCC) with the fittings, which were 90 degree Talbot elbows. JCCC installed 214 laterals using the elbows provided by WSC.
In late 2012, officials noticed that some of the elbows had failed and caused leaks; Davis said that 19 elbows have failed so far.
He said that the Ingraham administration should assume responsibility for the failures since the materials were installed under the former government's watch.
"The manufacturer is standing by their product," Davis said. "A bad decision was made in the first place under their watch to acquire the 214 Talbot elbows to be used as laterals below the surface."
Davis said the manufacturer has submitted a report to the government which said that the elbows may not be suitable for the use that WSC recommended.

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